Graduate School of Education


Showing 1-10 of 20 Results

  • William Damon

    William Damon

    Professor of Education and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment of purpse through the lifespan; the formation of purpose during adolescence; educational methods for promoting purpose and the capacity for good work.

  • Linda Darling-Hammond

    Linda Darling-Hammond

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the School of Education, Emerita

    BioLinda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emeritus at Stanford University and founding president of the Learning Policy Institute, created to provide high-quality research for policies that enable equitable and empowering education for each and every child. At Stanford she founded the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education and served as faculty sponsor for the Stanford Teacher Education Program, which she helped to redesign.

    Darling-Hammond is past president of the American Educational Research Association and recipient of its awards for Distinguished Contributions to Research, Lifetime Achievement, Research Review, and Research-to-Policy. She is also a member of the American Association of Arts and Sciences and of the National Academy of Education. From 1994–2001, she was executive director of the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, whose 1996 report What Matters Most: Teaching for America’s Future was named one of the most influential reports affecting U.S. education in that decade. In 2006, Darling-Hammond was named one of the nation’s ten most influential people affecting educational policy. In 2008, she directed President Barack Obama's Education Policy Transition Team. She is currently President of the California State Board of Education.

    Darling-Hammond began her career as a public school teacher and co-founded both a preschool and a public high school. She served as Director of the RAND Corporation’s education program and as an endowed professor at Columbia University, Teachers College before coming to Stanford. She has consulted widely with federal, state and local officials and educators on strategies for improving education policies and practices and is the recipient of 14 honorary degrees in the U.S. and internationally. Among her more than 600 publications are a number of award-winning books, including The Right to Learn, Teaching as the Learning Profession, Preparing Teachers for a Changing World and The Flat World and Education: How America's Commitment will Determine our Future. She received an Ed.D. from Temple University (with highest distinction) and a B.A. from Yale University (magna cum laude).

  • Caroline Daws

    Caroline Daws

    Ph.D. Student in Biology, admitted Autumn 2017
    Ph.D. Minor, Education

    BioCaroline is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE) and a fungal ecologist by training. She was born and raised in Tennessee and completed a B.S. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee and will finish her PhD in Fall 2022 in Ecology and Evolution at Stanford University with a doctoral minor from the Graduate School of Education. Caroline’s dissertation research focused on how symbiotic relationships between plants and fungi can shape the composition and functions of forests and what these interactions can teach us about the ways our forests are changing and how to steward them. Combining field studies in Big Basin State Park, seedling experiments in the greenhouse, and sequencing work in the lab, she studied how these fungal partners can facilitate the coexistence of multiple tree species we see in coast redwood forests in the Bay area, and how changes to microbial communities might have far reaching consequences in forest composition in the long term.

    Caroline was drawn to ecology as a new lens through which to see and understand the world through intentional practices of noticing and naming. In her teaching, Caroline invites students to harness their own lived experiences to investigate, question, and grow the narratives we learn and tell about humans and the natural world. She has taught introductory ecology, scientific methodology and writing on lichen community ecology at Stanford, and most recently she taught field courses in intertidal ecology and fungal ecology at Outer Coast in Sitka, Alaska. When she's not in the lab or in the classroom, Caroline is probably in the kitchen, in the ceramics studio, or outside on foot or on a bike.

  • Thomas Dee

    Thomas Dee

    Barnett Family Professor, Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioThomas S. Dee, Ph.D., is the Barnett Family Professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education (GSE), a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and the Faculty Director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities. His research focuses largely on the use of quantitative methods to inform contemporary issues of public policy and practice. The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) awarded his collaborative research the Raymond Vernon Memorial Award in 2015 and again in 2019. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Educational Research Journal, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Education Finance and Policy.