Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


Showing 61-70 of 192 Results

  • Hyowon Gweon

    Hyowon Gweon

    Associate Professor of Psychology
    On Leave from 10/01/2022 To 12/31/2022

    BioHyowon (Hyo) Gweon (she/her) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology. As a leader of the Social Learning Lab, Hyo is broadly interested in how humans learn from others and help others learn: What makes human social learning so powerful, smart, and distinctive? Taking an interdisciplinary approach that combines developmental, computational, and neuroimaging methods, her research aims to explain the cognitive underpinnings of distinctively human learning, communication, and prosocial behaviors.

    Hyo received her PhD in Cognitive Science (2012) from MIT, where she continued as a post-doc before joining Stanford in 2014. She has been named as a Richard E. Guggenhime Faculty Scholar (2020) and a David Huntington Dean's Faculty Scholar (2019); she is a recipient of the APS Janet Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions (2020), Jacobs Early Career Fellowship (2020), James S. McDonnell Scholar Award for Human Cognition (2018), APA Dissertation Award (2014), and Marr Prize (best student paper, Cognitive Science Society 2010).

  • Nicholas Haber

    Nicholas Haber

    Assistant Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use AI models of of exploratory and social learning in order to better understand early human learning and development, and conversely, I use our understanding of early human learning to make robust AI models that learn in exploratory and social ways. Based on this, I develop AI-powered learning tools for children, geared in particular towards the education of those with developmental issues such as the Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in the mold of my work on the Autism Glass Project. My formal graduate training in pure mathematics involved extending partial differential equation theory in cases involving the propagation of waves through complex media such as the space around a black hole. Since then, I have transitioned to the use of machine learning in developing both learning tools for children with developmental disorders and AI and cognitive models of learning.

  • Francois Haddad

    Francois Haddad

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Francois Haddad, MD is a Clinical Professor of Medicine that specializes in the field of cardio-vascular imaging, pulmonary hypertension, advanced heart failure and transplantation. Dr. Haddad has over 18 years of practice in the field of cardiology. He directs Stanford Cardiovascular Institute Biomarker and Phenotypic Core Laboratory dedicated to translational studies in cardiovascular medicine. The laboratory focuses on (1) identifying early biomarkers of heart failure and aging, (2) bioengineering approaches to cardiovascular disease modeling and (3) novel informatic approach for the detection and risk stratification of disease. He is involved is several precision medicine initiatives in health including the Project Baseline, the Integrated Personalized Omics Profiling Initiative, the Athletic screening program at Stanford and the Strong-D cardiac rehabilitation initiative in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  • Lou Halamek

    Lou Halamek

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. development of hospital operations centers coupled with sophisticated simulation capabilities
    2. re-creation of near misses and adverse events
    3. optimizing human and system performance during resuscitation
    4. optimizing pattern recognition and situational awareness at the bedside
    5. evaluation and optimization of debriefing
    6. patient simulator design

  • Nicos Haralabidis

    Nicos Haralabidis

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bioengineering

    BioMy research interests lie within both sports and clinical biomechanics applications. I rely upon merging conventional biomechanical in vivo measurements together with state-of-the-art musculoskeletal modeling and optimal control simulation approaches. The integrative approach I take enables me to understand how an individual may run faster, jump further, walk following surgery or intervention, and simultaneously estimate internal body dynamics noninvasively. As a Postdoctoral Research Scholar within the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance I aim to explore how stochastic optimal control and reinforcement learning methods can be applied to further our understanding of sporting performance.

  • Brian A. Hargreaves

    Brian A. Hargreaves

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications and augmented reality applications in medicine. These include abdominal, breast and musculoskeletal imaging, which require development of faster, quantitative, and more efficient MRI methods that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. My work includes novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods and reconstruction tools and augmented reality in medicine.

  • H. Craig Heller

    H. Craig Heller

    Lorry I. Lokey/Business Wire Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurobiology of sleep, circadian rhythms, regulation of body temperature, mammalian hibernation, and human exercise physiology. Currently applying background in sleep and circadian neurobiology the understanding and correcting the learning disability of Down Syndrome.

  • Jaimie¬†Henderson, MD

    Jaimie Henderson, MD

    John and Jene Blume - Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor, Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests encompass several areas of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery, including frameless stereotactic approaches for therapy delivery to deep brain nuclei; cortical physiology and its relationship to normal and pathological movement; brain-computer interfaces; and the development of novel neuromodulatory techniques for the treatment of movement disorders, epilepsy, pain, and other neurological diseases.