School of Engineering


Showing 1-20 of 45 Results

  • Itai Ashlagi

    Itai Ashlagi

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioItai Ashlagi is an Associate Professor at the Management Science & Engineering Department.
    He is interested in game theory and the design and analysis of marketplaces. He is especially interested in marketplaces, in which matching is an essential activity. markets, for which he developed mechanisms using tools from operations/cs and economics. His work influenced the practice of Kidney exchange, for which he has become a Franz Edelman Laureate. Ashlagi received his PhD in operations research from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.
    Before coming to Stanford he was an assistant professor of Operations Management at Sloan, MIT and prior to that a postdoctoral researcher at HBS. He is the recipient of the outstanding paper award in the ACM conference of Electronic Commerce 2009. His research is supported by the NSF including an NSF-CAREER award.

  • Nicholas Bambos

    Nicholas Bambos

    Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2021 To 06/30/2022

    BioNick Bambos is R. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University, having a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Management Science & Engineering. He has been the Fortinet Founders Department Chair of the Management Science & Engineering Department (2016 – 20).

    He heads the Computer Systems Performance Engineering Lab (Perf-Lab) at Stanford, comprised of doctoral students and industry visitors engaged in various research projects, and was the Director (1999 – 2005) of the Stanford Networking Research Center (a research project of about $30M). He has published over 300 peer-reviewed research publications and graduated over 40 doctoral students (including two post-doctoral ones), who have moved on to leadership positions in academia, the Silicon Valley industries and technology startups, finance and venture capital, etc.

    His research interests are in architecture and high-performance engineering of computer systems and networks, as well as data analytics with an emphasis on medical and health-care analytics. His research contributions span the areas of networking and the Internet, cloud computing and data centers, multimedia streaming, computer security, digital health, etc. His methodological interests and contributions span the areas of network control, online task scheduling, routing and distributed processing, machine learning and artificial intelligence, etc.

    He received his Ph.D. (1989) in Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences from the University of California at Berkeley. Before joining Stanford in 1996, he served as assistant professor (1989 – 95) and tenured associate professor (1995 – 96) of Electrical Engineering at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA).

    He has received several best research paper awards and has been the Cisco Systems Faculty Development Chair and the David Morgenthaler Faculty Scholar at Stanford. He has won the IBM Faculty Award, as well as the National Young Investigator Award and the Research Initiation Award from the National Science Foundation. He has been a Berkeley U.C. Regents Fellow, an E. C. Anthony Fellow, and a D. & S. Gale Fellow.

    He has served on various editorial boards of research journals, scientific boards of research labs, international technical and scientific committees, and technical review panels for networking and computing technologies. He has also served on corporate technical boards, as consultant and co-founder of technology start-up companies, and as expert witness in high-profile patent litigation and other legal cases involving information technologies.

  • Stephen R. Barley

    Stephen R. Barley

    Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTechnology's role in occupational and organizational change. Science and innovation in industrial settings. Organizational and occupational culture. Corporate power. Social network theory. Macro-organizational behavior.

  • Jose Humberto Blanchet Mancilla

    Jose Humberto Blanchet Mancilla

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioJose Blanchet holds a Ph.D. in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University. Prior to joining MSandE he was a faculty member of Columbia and Harvard University. Jose is a recipient of the 2009 Best Publication Award given by the INFORMS Applied Probability Society and of the 2010 Erlang Prize. He also received a PECASE award given by NSF in 2010. He worked as an analyst in Protego Financial Advisors, a leading investment bank in Mexico. He has research interests in applied probability and Monte Carlo methods. He serves in the editorial board of Advances in Applied Probability, Journal of Applied Probability, Mathematics of Operations Research, QUESTA, Stochastic Models, and Stochastic Systems.

  • Margaret Brandeau

    Margaret Brandeau

    Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Policy (PCOR)
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2021 To 06/30/2022

    BioProfessor Brandeau is the Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and a Professor of Medicine (by Courtesy). Her research focuses on the development of applied mathematical and economic models to support health policy decisions. Her recent work has focused on HIV prevention and treatment programs, programs to control the US opioid epidemic, and policies for minimizing the spread of infectious diseases, including COVID-19. She has served as Principal Investigator or Co-PI on a broad range of funded research projects.

    She is a Fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) and a member of the Omega Rho International Honor Society for Operations Research and Management Science. From INFORMS she has received the President’s Award (recognizing important contributions to the welfare of society), the Pierskalla Prize (in 2001 and 2017, for research excellence in health care management science), the Philip McCord Morse Lectureship Award, and the Award for the Advancement of Women in Operations Research and the Management Sciences. She has also received the Award for Excellence in Application of Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes Research from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, among other awards. Professor Brandeau earned a BS in Mathematics and an MS in Operations Research from MIT, and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems from Stanford.

  • Thomas Byers

    Thomas Byers

    Entrepreneurship Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplied ethics, responsible innovation, and global entrepreneurship education (see http://peak.stanford.edu).

  • Richard Cottle

    Richard Cottle

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioRichard W. (Dick) Cottle was born in Chicago in 1934. He received his elementary and high school education in the neighboring village of Oak Park. Dick enrolled at Harvard College to take up political science and premedical studies in order to become a physician (or possibly a foreign service officer if that didn't work out). As it happened, both of these alternatives were abandoned because he was strongly attracted to mathematics and ultimately received his bachelor's degree in that field. He stayed on at Harvard and received the master's degree in mathematics in 1958. This was the Sputnik era, and Dick was moved by a passion to teach secondary-level mathematics. In the first of a series of fateful decisions, he joined the Mathematics Department at the Middlesex School in Concord, Massachusetts where for two years he taught grades 7-12. Midway through this period he married his wife Suzanne (Sue). At this time he began to think of returning to graduate school for a doctorate in mathematics. He decided to study geometry at the University of California at Berkeley and was admitted there. Just before leaving Middlesex, Dick received a telephone call from the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley offering him the part- time job as a computer programmer for which he had applied. Through this job, he became aware of linear and quadratic programming and the contributions of George Dantzig and Philip Wolfe. Before long, Dick left the Rad Lab to join Dantzig's team at the Operations Research Center at UC Berkeley. Under the tutelage of George Dantzig (and the late Edmund Eisenberg), Dick developed a symmetric duality theory and what was then called the "composite problem". These topics along with a reëxamination of the Fritz John conditions, formed the core of his doctoral dissertation. The composite problem involved a fusion of the primal and dual first-order optimality conditions. It was realized that the resulting inequality system could be studied without reference to the primal-dual structure out of which it was born. The name "complementarity problem" was suggested by Dick and introduced in a joint paper with Habetler and Lemke. After Berkeley, Dick's work took two closely related directions. One was the study of quadratic programming; the other was what we now call "linear complementarity". The interesting role played by classes of matrices in both these areas has always held a special fascination for Dick. In quadratic programming, for instance, with Jacques Ferland he obtained characterizations of quasi- and pseudo-convexity of quadratic functions. Dick (and others) were quick to recognize the importance of matrix classes in linear complementarity theory. It was he who proposed the name "copositive-plus" for a matrix class that arose in Lemke's seminal paper of 1965. The name first appeared in the classic paper of Cottle and Dantzig called "Complementary Pivot Theory of Mathematical Programming". The subjects of quadratic programming and linear complementarity (and the associated matrix theory) remain central to his research interests.

  • Charles (Chuck) Eesley

    Charles (Chuck) Eesley

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the influence of the external environment on entrepreneurship. I investigate the types of environments that encourage the founding of high growth, technology-based firms. I build on previous literature that explains why entrepreneurs are successful and my major contribution is to demonstrate that institutions matter. I show that effective institutional change influences who starts firms, not just how many firms are started.

  • Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D. Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical approaches: Cognition, complexity, learning, and organizational theories

    Methods: Multi-case Theory Building as well as machine learning, simulation, and econometrics

    Recent research: Business model design, strategy as "simple rules" heuristics, strategic interaction in novel markets and ecosystems, strategy in marketplaces, communities v. firm organizational forms

  • Kay Giesecke

    Kay Giesecke

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsKay is a financial technologist and engineer. He develops stochastic financial models, designs statistical methods for analyzing financial data, examines simulation and other numerical algorithms for solving the associated computational problems, and performs empirical analyses. Much of Kay's work is driven by important applications in areas such as credit risk management, investment management, and, most recently, housing finance.

  • Ashish Goel

    Ashish Goel

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioAshish Goel is a Professor of Management Science and Engineering and (by courtesy) Computer Science at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Computer Science from Stanford in 1999, and was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southern California from 1999 to 2002. His research interests lie in the design, analysis, and applications of algorithms.

  • Warren Hausman

    Warren Hausman

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Hausman performs research in operations planning and control, with specific interests in supply chain management. Most of his contributions are based upon quantitative modeling techniques and emphasize relevance and real world applicability.

    He has recently studied how RFID technology can revolutionize the management of supply chains. He has investigated the value of RFID applications in retail environments, in logistics, and in manufacturing and assembly operations. He has also studied how Supply Flexibility in retail supply chains affects a company's financial performance and market capitalization.

    He is an active consultant to industry and is involved in numerous executive education programs both at Stanford and around the world. He was the founding director of a two-day executive program on Integrated Supply Chain Management held semi-annually in Palo Alto, California from 1994 to 2003. His consulting clients represent the following industries: general manufacturing, electronics, computers, consumer products, food & beverage, transportation, healthcare, and high technology. He is also a co-founder of Supply Chain Online, which provides web-based corporate supply chain management training. He serves on the technical advisory boards of several Silicon Valley startups. He has also served as an Expert Witness for litigation involving operations management

    In 1994 he was elected President of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA). He has also served on the Board of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) and on several National Science Foundation Advisory Panels and Committees. He is a Fellow of INFORMS, a Distinguished Fellow of the Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Society, and a Fellow of the Production & Operations Management Society. He has also won several teaching awards, including the Eugene Grant Teaching Award in Stanford's School of Engineering in 1998.

    He earned a BA in Economics from Yale and a PhD from MIT's Sloan School of Management.

  • Pamela Hinds

    Pamela Hinds

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioPamela J. Hinds is Fortinet Founders Chair and Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Co-Director of the Center on Work, Technology, and Organization and on the Director's Council for the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design.. She studies the effect of technology on teams, collaboration, and innovation. Pamela has conducted extensive research on the dynamics of cross-boundary work teams, particularly those spanning national borders. She explores issues of culture, language, identity, conflict, and the role of site visits in promoting knowledge sharing and collaboration. She has published extensively on the relationship between national culture and work practices, particularly exploring how work practices or technologies created in one location are understood and employed at distant sites. Pamela also has a body of research on human-robot interaction in the work environment and the dynamics of human-robot teams. Most recently, Pamela has been looking at the changing nature of work in the face of emerging technologies, including the nature of coordination in open innovation, changes in work and organizing resulting from 3D-printing, and the work of data analysts. Her research has appeared in journals such as Organization Science, Research in Organizational Behavior, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Annals, Academy of Management Discoveries, Human-Computer Interaction, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. Pamela is a Senior Editor of Organization Science. She is also co-editor with Sara Kiesler of the book Distributed Work (MIT Press). Pamela holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Science and Management from Carnegie Mellon University.

  • Ronald Howard

    Ronald Howard

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioRonald A. Howard has been Professor in the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems (now the Department of Management Science and Engineering) in the School of Engineering of Stanford University since 1965. Professor Howard is one of the founders of the decision analysis discipline. His books on probabilistic modeling, decision analysis, dynamic programming, and Markov processes serve as major references for courses and research in these fields.

    Professor Howard directs teaching and research in the Decision Analysis Program of the Department of Management Science and Engineering. He also is the Director of the Decisions and Ethics Center, which examines the efficacy and ethics of social arrangements. Professor Howard defined the profession of decision analysis in 1964 and has since supervised several doctoral theses in decision analysis every year. His experience includes dozens of decision analysis projects that range over virtually all fields of application, from investment planning to research strategy, and from hurricane seeding to nuclear waste isolation. He has been a consultant to several companies and was a founding Director and Chairman of Strategic Decisions Group. He is President of the Decision Education Foundation, which he and colleagues founded to teach decision skills to young people.

    He has written four books, dozens of technical papers, and provided editorial service to seven technical journals. He was founding Editor of the Journal of the Society for Scientific Exploration. He has lectured in decision analysis at universities in several foreign countries, including the former Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China. His national society affiliations have included the Operations Research Society of America; the Operational Research Society (U. K.); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (Fellow); the Institute of Management Science, which he served as President, and INFORMS, The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, (Fellow). Current research interests are improving the quality of decisions, life-and-death decision making, and the creation of a coercion-free society.

    In 1986 he received the Operations Research Society of America's Frank P. Ramsey Medal "for Distinguished Contributions in Decision Analysis. In 1998 he received from INFORMS the first award for the Teaching of Operations Research/Management Science Practice. In 1999, this organization invited him to give the Omega Rho Distinguished Plenary Lecture at the Cincinnati National Meeting. In the same year, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and received the Dean's Award for Academic Excellence.

    Professor Howard earned his Sc.D. in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1958. He was Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Associate Professor of Industrial Management, and Associate Director of the Operations Research Center at MIT when he joined the Stanford faculty as Professor in 1965.

  • Hillard Huntington

    Hillard Huntington

    Executive Director, Energy Modeling Forum
    Affiliate, Management Science and Engineering - Energy Modeling Forum

    BioHuntington is Executive Director of Stanford University's Energy Modeling Forum, where he conducts studies to improve the usefulness of models for understanding energy and environmental problems. In 2005 the Forum received the prestigious Adelman-Frankel Award from the International Association for Energy Economics for its "unique and innovative contribution to the field of energy economics."

    His current research interests are modeling energy security, energy price shocks, energy market impacts of environmental policies, and international natural gas and LNG markets. In 2002 he won the Best Paper Award from the Energy Journal for a paper co-authored with Professor Dermot Gately of New York University.

    He is a Senior Fellow and a past-President of the United States Association for Energy Economics and a member of the National Petroleum Council. He was also Vice-President for Publications for the International Association for Energy Economics and a member of the American Statistical Association's Committee on Energy Data. Previously, he served on a joint USA-Russian National Academy of Sciences Panel on energy conservation research and development.

    Huntington has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the California Energy Commission.

    Prior to coming to Stanford in 1980, he held positions in the corporate and government sectors with Data Resources Inc., the U.S. Federal Energy Administration, and the Public Utilities Authority in Monrovia, Liberia (as a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer).

  • Ramesh Johari

    Ramesh Johari

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioJohari is broadly interested in the design, economic analysis, and operation of online platforms, as well as statistical and machine learning techniques used by these platforms (such as search, recommendation, matching, and pricing algorithms).