School of Engineering


Showing 1-50 of 2,503 Results

  • Daniel Herschlag

    Daniel Herschlag

    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is aimed at understanding the chemical and physical behavior underlying biological macromolecules and systems, as these behaviors define the capabilities and limitations of biology. Toward this end we study folding and catalysis by RNA, as well as catalysis by protein enzymes.

  • Trevor Hastie

    Trevor Hastie

    John A. Overdeck Professor, Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFlexible statistical modelling, datamining, bioinformatics, and statistical computing.

  • Stephen Quake

    Stephen Quake

    Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle molecule biophysics, precision force measurement, micro and nano fabrication with soft materials, integrated microfluidics and large scale biological automation.

  • Brian Hargreaves

    Brian Hargreaves

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications including cardiovascular, abdominal, breast and musculoskeletal imaging. These applications require development of faster and more efficient MRI methods that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. My work includes novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods and reconstruction tools. Please see my research site (above) for most up-to-date information.

  • Ross Shachter

    Ross Shachter

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Shachter's research has focused on the representation, manipulation, and analysis of uncertainty and probabilistic reasoning in decision systems. As part of this work, he developed the DAVID influence diagram processing system for the Macintosh. He has developed models scheduling patients for cancer follow-up, and analyzing vaccination strategies for HIV and Helobacter pylori.

  • Geoffrey Gurtner

    Geoffrey Gurtner

    Johnson & Johnson Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeoffrey Gurtner's Lab is interested in understanding the mecahnism of new blood vessel growth following injury and how pathways of tissue regeneration and fibrosis interact in wound healing.

  • Ron Fedkiw

    Ron Fedkiw

    Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioFedkiw's research is focused on the design of new computational algorithms for a variety of applications including computational fluid dynamics, computer graphics, and biomechanics.

  • Nicholas Melosh

    Nicholas Melosh

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science

    BioMelosh's research is focused on developing methods to detect and control chemical processes on the nanoscale, to create materials that are responsive to their local environment. The research goal incorporates many of the hallmarks of biological adaptability, based on feedback control between cellular receptors and protein expression. Similar artificial networks may be achieved by fabricating arrays of nanoscale devices that can detect and influence their local surroundings through ionic potential, temperature, mechanical motion, capacitance, or electrochemistry. These devices are particularly suited as smart biomaterials, where multiple surface-cell interactions must be monitored and adjusted simultaneously for optimal cell adhesion and growth. Other interests include precise control over self-assembled materials, and potential methods to monitor the diagnostics of complicated chemical systems, such as the effect of drug treatments within patients.

    Research Interests:
    Molecular materials at interfaces
    Directed dynamic self-assembly
    Controlling molecular or biomolecular assembly and behavior
    Influence of local electronic, optical or thermal stimuli

  • Gunnar Carlsson

    Gunnar Carlsson

    Ann and Bill Swindells Professor, Emeritus

    BioDr. Carlsson has been a professor of mathematics at Stanford University since 1991. In the last ten years, he has been involved in adapting topological techniques to data analysis, under NSF funding and as the lead PI on the DARPA “Topological Data Analysis” project from 2005 to 2010. He is the lead organizer of the ATMCS conferences, and serves as an editor of several Mathematics journals

  • David Donoho

    David Donoho

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioDavid Donoho is a mathematician who has made fundamental contributions to theoretical and computational statistics, as well as to signal processing and harmonic analysis. His algorithms have contributed significantly to our understanding of the maximum entropy principle, of the structure of robust procedures, and of sparse data description.

    Research Statement:
    My theoretical research interests have focused on the mathematics of statistical inference and on theoretical questions arising in applying harmonic analysis to various applied problems. My applied research interests have ranged from data visualization to various problems in scientific signal processing, image processing, and inverse problems.

  • Fei-Fei Li

    Fei-Fei Li

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman vision, high-level visual recognition, computational neuroscience

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. My group works on a variety of organisms and model systems ranging from humans and other primates to domesticated plant and animals. Much of our research is at the interface of computational biology, mathematical genetics, and evolutionary genomics.

  • Brad Osgood

    Brad Osgood

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Education

    BioOsgood is a mathematician by training and applies techniques from analysis and geometry to various engineering problems. He is interested in problems in imaging, pattern recognition, and signal processing.

  • Christos Makridis

    Christos Makridis

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2012
    Master of Arts Student in Economics, admitted Autumn 2014
    Ph.D. Minor, Economics

    BioChristos Makridis is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University.

  • Jenny Suckale

    Jenny Suckale

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioBefore joining Stanford in January 2014, I held a position as Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and as a Ziff Environmental Fellow at Harvard. I hold a PhD in Geophysics from MIT and a Master in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School. Prior to joining graduate school, I worked as a scientific consultant for different international organizations aiming to reduce the impact of natural and environmental disasters in vulnerable communities.

    The goal of my research is to advance our basic understanding and predictive capabilities of complex multi-phase flows that are fundamental to Earth science. I pursue this goal by developing original computational methods customized for the problem at hand. The phenomena I explore range from the microscopic to the planetary scale and space a wide variety of geophysics systems such as volcanoes, glaciers, and magma oceans.

    I have taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in scientific, planetary evolution, and natural disasters. Since arriving at Stanford in January 2014, I have co-taught GES 118, Understanding Natural Hazards, Quantifying Risk, Increasing Resilience in Highly Urbanized Regions.

  • Stephen R. Barley

    Stephen R. Barley

    Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTechnology's role in occupational and organizational change. Science and innovation in industrial settings. Organizational and occupational culture. Corporate power. Social network theory. Macro-organizational behavior.

  • Debbie Senesky

    Debbie Senesky

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Senesky's research is centered on the development of micro- and nano-systems for operation within extreme harsh environments. Her laboratory (EXtreme Environment Microsystems Laboratory, XLab) is researching the synthesis of temperature tolerant, chemically resistant, and radiation-hardened wide bandgap semiconductor thin films and nanostructures. These new material sets serve as a platform for the realization of sensor, actuator, and electronic components that can operate and collect data under the most hostile conditions. More specifically, smart and adaptable structures for extreme environments are enabled through the technology developed in her laboratory. Her research efforts support a variety of applications including deep space systems, hypersonic aircrafts, combustion monitoring and subsurface monitoring.

  • Matthias Ihme

    Matthias Ihme

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioLarge-eddy simulation and modeling of turbulent reacting flows, non-premixed flame, aeroacoustics and combustion generated noise, turbulence and fluid dynamics, numerical methods and high-order schemes.

  • Melissa Valentine

    Melissa Valentine

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMelissa Valentine is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Management Science and Engineering Department, and co-director of the Center for Work, Technology, and Organization (WTO). WTO is a world leader in producing field research (i.e., research that uses actual observation of social phenomena) to develop new understanding about the changing nature of work.

    Prof Valentine's research focus is on understanding work groups and teams in organizations, particularly how they are changing in response to new industry trends and new technologies. She conducts in-depth observational studies to develop new understanding about new forms of work groups and teams. Her work makes contributions to understanding classic and longstanding challenges in designing groups and organizations (e.g., the role of hierarchy, how to implement change, team stability vs. flexibility) but also brings in deep knowledge of how the rise of information technology has made possible new and different team and organizational forms. Her research agenda is organized around two main themes: 1) temporary teams and organizations and 2) groups and teams in complex work organizations.

    Prof. Valentine has won awards for both research and teaching. With her collaborators, she won a Best Paper Award at the CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and the Outstanding Paper with Practical Implications award from the Organizational Behavior division of the Academy of Management. In 2013, she won the Organization Science/INFORMS dissertation proposal competition and received her PhD from Harvard University.

  • Hatim A. Rahman

    Hatim A. Rahman

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2013

    BioHatim A. Rahman is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University.

    RESEARCH AREA: Work, Technology, and Organization
    DISSERTATION TITLE: Understanding Social Dynamics in the Digital Economy: An Inductive Analysis of Relationships in an Online Labor Market

    RESEARCH ABSTRACT:
    Hatim Rahman's dissertation explores the nature of work in the emerging digital economy. In contrast to research that emphasizes the importance of algorithmic matching and technical fit, his research theorizes work in online labor markets as collaborative, relational, and imperfectly defined in nature. He integrates a digital ethnography of an online labor market with a computational textual analysis of users’ discussion on community boards to demonstrate the social dynamics by which reputation systems have become inflated, the process market actors take to build relational contracts, and the different ways in which each actor uses features of the market to exert power. His dissertation has implications for the literature on technology affordances, power and resource dependence, external labor markets, relational contracting, market and platform design, and the emerging nature of work in the digital economy.

  • Boris Murmann

    Boris Murmann

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioBoris Murmann is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 2004 after completing his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. From 1994 to 1997, he was with Neutron Microelectronics, Germany, where he developed low-power and smart-power ASICs in automotive CMOS technology. Since 2004, he has worked as a consultant with numerous Silicon Valley companies. Dr. Murmann’s research interests are in mixed-signal integrated circuit design, with special emphasis on sensor interfaces, data converters and custom circuits for machine learning. In 2008, he was a co-recipient of the Best Student Paper Award at the VLSI Circuits Symposium and a recipient of the Best Invited Paper Award at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC). He received the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2009 and the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award in 2012. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, as well as the Data Converter Subcommittee Chair and the Technical Program Chair of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the faculty director of Stanford's System Prototyping Facility (SPF). He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

  • Yoichi Shiga

    Yoichi Shiga

    Ph.D. Student in Civil and Environmental Engineering, admitted Autumn 2011

    BioYoichi Shiga received his bachelor's degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of California, San Diego and master's in Environmental Engineering from the University of Michigan. He is currently a PhD candidate in Environmental Engineering at Stanford University where his research explores complex environmental systems through the use and development of data driven statistical methods.

    His research focuses on improving the current understanding of both the natural and anthropogenic components of the carbon cycle using inverse modeling approaches to provide an atmospheric data constraint on CO2 fluxes.

    Yoichi is also an active member in the Stanford student chapter of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE).

  • Tanja Aitamurto

    Tanja Aitamurto

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Management Science and Engineering

    BioI am a social scientist influenced heavily by engineering sciences. My work examines civic technologies for informing, empowering, and connecting people. The empirical contexts range from virtual, mixed, and augmented reality to large-scale online collaboration systems, such as applications of collective intelligence in open and participatory journalism, deliberation and policy-making, civic crowdfunding, and applications of artificial intelligence for civic use. I develop interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks by drawing on social psychology, democratic theory, computer science, and information systems. My work has been recognized with a number of awards and published in top journals, such as New Media & Society, Design Issues, Information, Communication & Society and International Journal of Communication.

    I am a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford, where I work in the Crowdsourced Democracy Team. I received my PhD in social sciences at the School of Communication, Media and Theatre at the University of Tampere in Finland in 2014. Previously I worked as a postdoctoral Brown Fellow and as Deputy Director of the Brown Institute for Media Innovation at Stanford. During my doctoral studies, I studied as a visiting student researcher at Stanford and at UC Berkeley

    In my dissertation “Collective Intelligence in Open Journalism: Power, Knowledge and Value”, I introduced a theory of open journalism. My dissertation received the Gene Burd Outstanding Dissertation in Journalism Studies Award from the International Communication Association (ICA). Drawing from several empirical cases, I showed how the building blocks of collective intelligence—a large number of participants and cognitive, demographic, and socioeconomic diversity within the crowd—both support and challenge journalistic norms, practices, and values through open journalism.

    My studies often have unique in-the-wild experiments, in which I collaborate with media organizations and local and national governments. I have designed and developed several online platforms and processes for crowdsourced journalism and policymaking and advised local and national governments in participatory policymaking projects. Currently I'm working with the city of Palo Alto on a crowdsourced urban planning strategy process.

    More about my work at www.tanjaaitamurto.com

  • Heather Altman

    Heather Altman

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2015

    BioHeather is interested in team dynamics in global work environments, in particular how teams coordinate and collaborate to promote creativity and innovation. Her current research project investigates the work factors and team dynamics that influence innovation across cultures. Heather holds a B.A. with honors in Psychology from Stanford University.

  • Kristen M. Altenburger

    Kristen M. Altenburger

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2015

    BioI am a third year PhD candidate in the Management Science & Engineering Department at Stanford University and am a member of the Social Algorithms Lab. My research interests include social network analysis, machine learning, and causal inference.

  • Gonzalo Valdes

    Gonzalo Valdes

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Management Science and Engineering

    BioRESEARCH AREA: Organizations, Technology, and Entrepreneurship
    DISSERTATION TITLE: Institutional Effects in the Worldwide Expansion of the Innovation Economy

    RESEARCH ABSTRACT:
    Gonzalo Valdes' doctoral dissertation addresses the question of why some countries’ attempts to imitate first world approaches to innovation succeed, while others are much less successful. Specifically, his research links institutional theory to the socio-technical and socio-economic capabilities of organizations within countries to produce innovation. Additionally, he recently published a paper, together with Prof. Stephen Barley, about the need for continual learning in the information economy (“The learning imperative in postindustrial work.” In Work and occupations). He also published research about the capabilities of the public sector to harness the opportunities of ICT (e.g., “E-government maturity model.” In GIQ).

  • Marco Pavone

    Marco Pavone

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Marco Pavone is an Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, where he also holds courtesy appointments in the Department of Electrical Engineering, in the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, and in the Information Systems Laboratory. He is a Research Affiliate at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. Before joining Stanford, he was a Research Technologist within the Robotics Section at JPL. He received a Ph.D. degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010. Dr. Pavone’s areas of expertise lie in the fields of controls and robotics.

    Dr. Pavone is a recipient of a NASA Early Career Faculty award, a Hellman Faculty Scholar Award, and was named NASA NIAC Fellow in 2011. At JPL, Dr. Pavone worked on the end-to-end optimization of the mission architecture for the Mars sample return mission. He has designed control algorithms for formation flying that have been successfully tested on board the International Space Station.

    Dr. Pavone is the Director of the Autonomous Systems Laboratory (ASL). The goal of ASL is the development of methodologies for the analysis, design, and control of autonomous systems, with a particular emphasis on large-scale robotic networks and autonomous aerospace vehicles. The lab combines expertise from control theory, robotics, optimization, and operations research to develop the theoretical foundations for networked autonomous systems operating in uncertain, rapidly-changing, and potentially adversarial environments. Theoretical insights are then used to devise practical, computationally-efficient, and provably-correct algorithms for field deployment. Applications include robotic transportation networks, sensor networks, agile control of spacecraft during proximity operations, and mobility platforms for extreme planetary environments. Collaborations with NASA centers are a key component of the research portfolio.

  • Oliver Hinder

    Oliver Hinder

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2013

    BioOliver Hinder is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University.

  • Ece Kaynak

    Ece Kaynak

    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2013

    BioEce Kaynak is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University.

    Research Area: Work and occupations

    Ece is interested in the future of work, occupations, and post-bureaucratic modes of organizing. Her dissertation is an ethnography of coding bootcamps in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her previous work examined how organizations influence their political environments, which she studied through an ethnography of government affairs professionals. Ece holds a MSc in Management, Organizations & Governance from the London School of Economics and Political Science; and a BA in Sociology from Bogazici University in Istanbul. Prior to starting her PhD, Ece worked for five years at Pfizer, Deloitte and Avea Telecommunications in Istanbul, Turkey.

  • Ali Mani

    Ali Mani

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioOur research is broadly defined by multiphysics problems in fluid dynamics and transport engineering. Our work contributes to the understanding of these problems primarily through theoretical tools such as techniques of applied mathematics as well as massively-parallel simulations. Numerical simulations enable quantitative visualization of the detailed physical processes which can be difficult to detect experimentally. They also provide quantitative data that guide the development of reduced-order models, which would naturally induce insight for design, optimization and control. Most of our work involves complementary interactions with experimental groups within and outside of Stanford. Specific current research topics include:

    (1) Electro-convection and microscale chaos near electrochemical interfaces

    (2) Particle-laden flows with applications in solar receivers

    (3) Applications of superhydrophobic surfaces for drag reduction of turbulent flows

    (4) Micro-bubble generation by breaking waves

    (5) Electrokinetics of micropores and nanopores