School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 23 Results

  • Bruce Cain

    Bruce Cain

    Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in the School of Humanities & Sciences, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research & Professor at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability

    BioBruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

  • Hector Miguel Callejas

    Hector Miguel Callejas

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsINDIGENOUS CULTURAL IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT

    In 2014, the Legislative Assembly of El Salvador ratified a constitutional reform establishing multicultural state recognition of Indigenous peoples as citizens of the Salvadoran nation. The reform mandated the state development of Indigenous cultural identity, with a focus on Indigenous peoples' worldview, values, and spirituality. This book examines the politics of Indigenous cultural identity development in the capital city of San Salvador and the neighboring municipalities of Izalco and Nahuizalco in the western highlands. State authorities, Indigenous organizations, and other actors produced particular formations of Indigenous identity and culture for various projects related to nation-building, human rights, and tourism. The projects localized national multicultural governance, foregrounded racial difference, and reinforced racialized class inequality within each municipal community.

    Following the 20th century state project of national mestizaje, ordinary Salvadorans trivialized racial difference and racialized class inequality in everyday life. The national Ministry of Culture, municipal governments, and Indigenous leaders hosted public commemorations of Indigenous peoples that translated the state's vision of national multiculturalism for local audiences. Ministry officials and Indigenous activists mobilized Indigenous cultural identity for a national Supreme Court case on Indigenous genocide and municipal ordinances on Indigenous rights. The case and ordinances attempted to broaden the scope of state recognition beyond Indigenous culture to address entrenched patterns of Indigenous dispossession and exclusion, although progress on both stalled. Municipal governments, Indigenous leaders, mayordomos (civic-religious leaders), and handicraft workers reinvented local traditions as Indigenous cultural heritage for tourism development. The emerging tourism economy maintained racialized class divisions between rich and poor residents of Izalco and Nahuizalco.

    Hector conducted multi-sited ethnography from January of 2019 to March of 2020, during the transition period in national politics between the outgoing FMLN and incoming Bukele administrations. He entered the political and social worlds of Indigenous cultural identity development through the Red Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas, "El Jaguar Sonriente," an influential network of Indigenous organizations coordinated by the Ministry of Culture. He accessed the network through the Consejo de Pueblos Originarios Náhuat Pipil de Nahuizalco, a grassroots Indigenous organization.

    ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ACTIVISM

    Hector has opened a new field site on environmental justice activism in the Sacramento Valley of California. This emerging field of public policy addresses the unequal distribution of environmental hazards along the lines of income, ethnicity, and race. He entered this field through his parents' participation as faith-based community leaders in the Sacramento Environmental Justice Coalition, a grassroots organization. Hector and his family have lived and worked in an "Environmental Justice community" as defined by Sacramento County's Office of Planning & Environmental Review.

  • Brandice Canes-Wrone

    Brandice Canes-Wrone

    Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCanes-Wrone, Brandice, Jonathan T. Rothwell, and Christos Makridis. "Partisanship and Policy on an Emerging Issue: Mass and Elite Responses to COVID-19 as the Pandemic Evolved."

    Canes-Wrone, Brandice, Christian Ponce de Leon, and Sebastian Thieme. "Investment, Electoral Cycles, and Institutional Constraints in Developing Democracies."

    Barber, Michael J., Brandice Canes-Wrone, Joshua Clinton, and Gregory Huber. "
    “How Distinct are Campaign Donors’ Preferences? A Comparison of Donors to the Affluent and General US Populations.” (in progress)

    Barber, Michael J., and Brandice Canes-Wrone. "Validity of Self-Reported Donating Behavior." (in progress)

    Canes-Wrone, Brandice, Christian Ponce de Leon, and Sebastian Thieme. "Institutional Constraints of the European Union and Opportunistic Business Cycles." (in progress)

    Canes-Wrone, Brandice, Tom S. Clark, Amy Semet, and Sebastian Thieme. “Campaign Contributions and Judicial Independence in the US State Supreme Courts.” (in progress)

  • Laura L. Carstensen

    Laura L. Carstensen

    Director, Stanford Center on Longevity, Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr. Professor of Public Policy and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Policy

    BioLaura L. Carstensen is Professor of Psychology at Stanford University where she is the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy and founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. Her research on the theoretical and empirical study of motivational, cognitive, and emotional aspects of aging has been funded by the National Institute on Aging without interruption for more than 30 years. Carstensen is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She was a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on an Aging Society and served as a commissioner on the Global Roadmap for Healthy Longevity. Carstensen’s awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Kleemeier Award, The Richard Kalish Award for Innovative Research, and distinguished mentor awards from the Gerontological Society of America and the American Psychological Association. She authored A Long Bright Future: Happiness, Health, and Financial Security in an Age of Increased Longevity. Carstensen received her B.S. from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from West Virginia University. She holds an honorary doctorate from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

  • Emilee Chapman

    Emilee Chapman

    Assistant Professor of Political Science

    BioEmilee is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford. Her current research project examines the distinctive value of voting in contemporary democratic practice, and its significance for electoral reform and the ethics of participation.

  • David Cheriton

    David Cheriton

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioCheriton's research includes the areas of high-performance distributed systems, and high-speed computer communication with a particular interest in protocol design. He leads the Distributed Systems Group in the TRIAD project, focused on understanding and solving problems with the Internet architecture. He has also been teaching and writing about object-oriented programming, building on his experience with OOP in systems building.