School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 23 Results

  • Bruce Cain

    Bruce Cain

    Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioBruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

  • Laura Carstensen

    Laura Carstensen

    Director, Stanford Center on Longevity and the Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr. Professor in Public Policy

    BioLaura L. Carstensen is Professor of Psychology at Stanford University where she is the Fairleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy and founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. For more than twenty-five years her research has been supported by the National Institute on Aging and during that period she was honored with two MERIT awards. Her most current empirical research focuses on ways in which motivational changes influence cognitive processing. Dr. Carstensen is a fellow in the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association and the Gerontological Society of America. She was a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on an Aging Society and served on the National Advisory Council on Aging to National Institute on Aging. Carstensen has won numerous awards, including the Kleemeier Award, The Richard Kalish Award for Innovative Research and the Distinguished Mentorship Award from the Gerontological Society of America, as well as the Master Mentor Award from the American Psychological Association. She was selected as a Guggenheim Fellow in 2003 and in 2016 was inducted into the National Academy of Medicine. In 2011, she authored A Long Bright Future: Happiness, Health, and Financial Security in an Age of Increased Longevity. Carstensen received her B.S. from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from West Virginia University. She holds an honorary doctorate from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

  • Emilee Chapman

    Emilee Chapman

    Assistant Professor of Political Science

    BioEmilee is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford. Her current research project examines the distinctive value of voting in contemporary democratic practice, and its significance for electoral reform and the ethics of participation.

  • David Cheriton

    David Cheriton

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioCheriton's research includes the areas of high-performance distributed systems, and high-speed computer communication with a particular interest in protocol design. He leads the Distributed Systems Group in the TRIAD project, focused on understanding and solving problems with the Internet architecture. He has also been teaching and writing about object-oriented programming, building on his experience with OOP in systems building.

  • Angele Christin

    Angele Christin

    Assistant Professor of Communication and, by courtesy, of Sociology
    On Leave from 10/01/2020 To 06/30/2021

    BioAngèle Christin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication, and, by courtesy, in the Sociology Department at Stanford University. She studies fields and organizations where algorithms and ‘big data’ analytics transform professional values, expertise, and work practices. She received her PhD in Sociology from Princeton University and the EHESS (Paris).

  • Matthew Clair

    Matthew Clair

    Assistant Professor of Sociology and, by courtesy, of Law

    BioMatthew Clair is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and (by courtesy) the Law School. His research interests include law and society, race and ethnicity, cultural sociology, criminal justice, and qualitative methods. https://www.matthewclair.org/