Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-25 of 25 Results

  • Michelle María Early Capistrán

    Michelle María Early Capistrán

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Biology
    Postdoctoral Scholar, Oceans

    BioMichelle María Early Capistrán is a David H. Smith Conservation Fellow at the Crowder Lab. Her transdisciplinary research focuses on working collaboratively with coastal communities to improve conservation practice by integrating Local Ecological Knowledge and marine ecology. She was originally trained as a Cultural Anthropologist and holds an M.S. and PhD in Marine Science and Limnology (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM). For over a decade, she has collaborated with rural fishing communities in the Baja California peninsula to understand long-term changes in the abundance of endangered and culturally important green turtles (Chelonia mydas). She will work with Prof. Crowder, in collaboration with Jeff Seminoff of the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, to develop species distribution model for green turtles under climate change by integrating Local Ecological Knowledge and Citizen/Community Science.

  • Paul Ehrlich

    Paul Ehrlich

    Bing Professor of Population Studies, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of the social sciences in dealing with global change

  • Marco Einaudi

    Marco Einaudi

    Welton Joseph and Maud L'Anphere Crook Professor of Applied Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOre deposits and exploration; geology and geochemistry of hydrothermal mineral deposits

  • Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D. Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical approaches: Cognition, complexity, learning, and organizational theories

    Methods: Multi-case Theory Building as well as machine learning, simulation, and econometrics

    Recent research: Business model design, strategy as "simple rules" heuristics, strategic interaction in novel markets and ecosystems, strategy in marketplaces, communities v. firm organizational forms

  • Sahar El Abbadi

    Sahar El Abbadi

    Physical Science Research Scientist, Energy Science & Engineering

    BioSahar El Abbadi was a post-doctoral researcher in Energy Resources Engineering from Jan 2022 - Aug 2023. Her research focuses on developing circular economies by transforming waste methane into useful products. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is emitted atmosphere by industrial sources (wastewater treatment plants, landfill, fossil fuel extraction) because it is uneconomical to capture, clean and use. However, methane-consuming bacteria can transform this harmful pollutant into protein-rich cells and biodegradable polymers. Sahar's PhD research evaluated the economic potential of using these bacteria to reduce methane emissions while providing a new source of high-quality protein that can be used as a feed for agriculture and aquaculture. Sahar continues to expand on this work in considering the path to industrialization in both the United States and Bangladesh using methane produced at landfills. Sahar completed her Bachelor's degree at UC Berkeley (2012) in Environmental Engineering Science, and her MS (2015) and PhD (2021) in Civil & Environmental Engineering at Stanford.

  • Abbas El Gamal

    Abbas El Gamal

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioAbbas El Gamal is the Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received his B.Sc. Honors degree from Cairo University in 1972, and his M.S. in Statistics and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering both from Stanford University in 1977 and 1978, respectively. From 1978 to 1980, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at USC. From 2003 to 2012, he was the Director of the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. From 2012 to 2017 he was Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His research contributions have been in network information theory, FPGAs, and digital imaging devices and systems. He has authored or coauthored over 230 papers and holds 35 patents in these areas. He is coauthor of the book Network Information Theory (Cambridge Press 2011). He has received several honors and awards for his research contributions, including the 2016 Richard W. Hamming Medal, the 2012 Claude E. Shannon Award, and the 2004 INFOCOM Paper Award. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has co-founded and served on the board of directors and advisory boards of several semiconductor and biotechnology startup companies.

  • Robin Elahi

    Robin Elahi

    Advanced Lecturer

    BioI am an advanced lecturer at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station, where I teach courses in kelp forest ecology, statistics, and scientific computing. In general, I study drivers of spatial and temporal change in marine ecosystems. Ongoing and recent research projects include:
    -examining the consequences of fisheries closures on fisher behavior
    -understanding why some coral reefs fare better than their neighbors
    -biodiversity and body size change, particularly in the context of recent human impacts

  • Emily Ellefson

    Emily Ellefson

    Ph.D. Student in Geological Sciences, admitted Autumn 2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a palynologist, that is, I study fossilized pollen and spores! Previously I have worked on Permian-Triassic and Jurassic-Cretaceous palynology, but here at Stanford I'm excited to be exploring a new time interval and will be working on Silurian-Devonian palynology. My research will focus on how the evolution of terrestrial plants affected the marine redox record through palynology, paleobotany, and geochemistry.

  • William Ellsworth

    William Ellsworth

    Professor (Research) of Geophysics, Emeritus

    BioMy research interests can be broadly defined as the study of active faults, the earthquakes they generate and the physics of the earthquake source. A major objective of my work is to improve our knowledge of earthquake hazards through the application of physics-based understanding of the underlying processes. As Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity, my students, postdocs and I conduct multi-disciplinary studies into the causes and consequences of anthropogenic earthquakes in a wide variety of settings. I have also long been committed to earthquake risk reduction, specifically through the transfer of scientific understanding of the hazard to people, businesses, policymakers and government agencies. Before coming to Stanford in 2015, I was a research geophysicist at the U. S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, California for more than 40 years where I focused on problems of seismicity, seismotectonics, probabilistic earthquake forecasting, and earthquake source processes

  • Anton Ermakov

    Anton Ermakov

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the formation and evolution of the Solar System bodies and the ways we can constrain planetary interiors by geophysical measurements.

  • Stefano Ermon

    Stefano Ermon

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioI am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University, where I am affiliated with the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and a fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment.

    My research is centered on techniques for scalable and accurate inference in graphical models, statistical modeling of data, large-scale combinatorial optimization, and robust decision making under uncertainty, and is motivated by a range of applications, in particular ones in the emerging field of computational sustainability.

  • W Gary Ernst

    W Gary Ernst

    The Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPetrology/geochemistry and plate tectonics of Circumpacific and Alpine mobile belts; ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in Eurasia; geology of the California Coast Ranges, the cental Klamath Mountains, and White-Inyo Range; geobotany and remote sensing of the American Southwest; mineralogy and human health.

  • Amir Eskanlou

    Amir Eskanlou

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth and Planetary Sciences

    BioWith over a decade of research experience, my work is characterized by a dynamic synergy between hands-on experimental investigations and advanced computational analysis. My foundation is primarily in surface and interface chemistry, particle-bubble and particle-reagent interactions, adsorption, and dissolution in the context of critical materials recovery and mineral processing. I have extensive experience with characterization techniques, including SEM/EDS, UV-Vis, XRD, XRF, fluorescence spectroscopy, FTIR, and Zetasizer. On the computational front, I'm proficient in using DFT codes (QE, VASP, JDFTx) for ab initio computations, LAMMPS for large-scale molecular dynamics, and Python and R for ML and data analysis.
    I am interested in developing innovative materials and chemicals for applications in energy systems, energy storage, separation and purification processes, and waste valorization.

  • Rodney Ewing

    Rodney Ewing

    Frank Stanton Professor of Nuclear Security and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioRod Ewing is the Frank Stanton Professor in Nuclear Security in the Center for International Security and Cooperation in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University. He is the Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan, where he was in three Departments: Earth & Environmental Sciences, Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. He is also a Regents' Emeritus Professor at the University of New Mexico.

    Ewing received a B.S. degree in geology from Texas Christian University (1968, summa cum laude) and M.S. (l972) and Ph.D. (l974, with distinction) degrees from Stanford University where he held an NSF Fellowship. His graduate studies focused on an esoteric group of minerals, metamict Nb-Ta-Ti oxides, which are unusual because they have become amorphous due to radiation damage caused by the presence of radioactive elements. Over the past forty years, the early study of these unusual minerals has blossomed into a broadly based research program on radiation effects in complex ceramic materials. This has led to the development of techniques to predict the long-term behavior of materials, such as those used in radioactive waste disposal. He is the author or co-author of over 750 research publications and the editor or co-editor of 18 monographs, proceedings volumes or special issues of journals. He has published widely in mineralogy, geochemistry, materials science, nuclear materials, physics and chemistry in over 100 different ISI journals. He has been granted a patent for the development of a highly durable material for the immobilization of excess weapons plutonium.

    Ewing has received the Hawley Medal of the Mineralogical Association of Canada in 1997 and 2002, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002, the Dana Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America in 2006, the Lomonosov Gold Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 2006, a Honorary Doctorate from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in 2007, Roebling Medal of the Mineralogical Society of America, and is a foreign Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is also a fellow of the Geological Society of America, Mineralogical Society of America, American Geophysical Union, Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemistry, American Ceramic Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Materials Research Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2017.

    He has been president of the Mineralogical Society of America (2002) and the International Union of Materials Research Societies (1997-1998). Ewing has served on the Board of Directors of the Geochemical Society (2012-2015) and the Board of Governors of the Gemological Institute of America (2006-2015). He is a member of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and on the Editorial Board of Applied Physics Reviews . He is a founding Editor of the magazine Elements, which is now supported by 17 earth science societies, and a Founding Executive Editor of Geochemical Perspective Letters. He is a member of the Board of Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine (2017-2020).

    Professor Ewing is co-editor of and a contributing author of Radioactive Waste Forms for the Future (North-Holland Physics, Amsterdam, 1988) and Uncertainty Underground – Yucca Mountain and the Nation’s High-Level Nuclear Waste (MIT Press, 2006). He has served on eleven National Research Council committees for the National Academy of Sciences that have reviewed issues related to nuclear waste and nuclear weapons. He was appointed by President Obama to Chair the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (2012-2017).