Bio-X


Showing 801-850 of 994 Results

  • Mehrdad Shamloo

    Mehrdad Shamloo

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe ultimate goal of the Shamloo laboratory is to rapidly advance our understanding of brain function at the molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral levels, and to elucidate the pathological process underlying malfunction of the nervous system following injury and neurologic disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson’s disease, and autism. We have been focusing on the noradrenergic system and approaches leading to restoration of brain adrenergic signaling in these disorders.

  • Lucy Shapiro

    Lucy Shapiro

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA basic question in developmental biology involves the mechanisms used to generate the three-dimensional organization of a cell from a one-dimensional genetic code. Our goal is to define these mechanisms using both molecular genetics and biochemistry.

  • Eric S.G. Shaqfeh

    Eric S.G. Shaqfeh

    Lester Levi Carter Professor and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have over 25 years experience in theoretical and computational research related to complex fluids following my PhD in 1986. This includes work in suspension mechanics of rigid partlcles (rods), solution mechanics of polymers and most recently suspensions of vesicles, capsules and mixtures of these with rigid particles. My research group is internationally known for pioneering work in all these areas.

  • Naima G. Sharaf

    Naima G. Sharaf

    Assistant Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in the lab bridges biology, microbiology, and immunology to translate lipoprotein research into therapeutics

  • Carla Shatz

    Carla Shatz

    Sapp Family Provostial Professor, The Catherine Holman Johnson Director of Stanford Bio-X and Professor of Biology and of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of research in the Shatz Laboratory is to discover how brain circuits are tuned up by experience during critical periods of development both before and after birth by elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms that transform early fetal and neonatal brain circuits into mature connections. To discover mechanistic underpinnings of circuit tuning, the lab has conducted functional screens for genes regulated by neural activity and studied their function for vision, learning and memory.

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Kevin Shea

    Kevin Shea

    Chambers-Okamura Endowed Professor of Pediatric Orthopaedics

    BioKevin G. Shea, MD is an orthopaedic surgeon at Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. Dr. Shea grew up in Montana and California, graduated from the UCLA School of Medicine, and completed his orthopaedic residency at the University of Utah School of Medicine. His advanced training includes pediatric orthopaedics at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego, AO Fellowship in Bern Switzerland with Drs. Ganz (Hip), Dr. Diego Fernandez (Trauma), and Dr. Hans Staubli (sports), and Ilizarov Training in Lecco, Italy. He was the AOSSM Traveling Sports Medicine Fellow in 2008, and practiced in Boise, ID prior to joining the Stanford Faculty. Dr. Shea is a founding member of the PRiSM Society (Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine), the ROCK (Research in OsteoChondritis of the Knee) Multi-center Study Group, and the SCORE prospective cohort registry for pediatric sports arthroscopy outcomes, complications. He is a member of the AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons), POSNA (Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America) and the AOSSM (American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine). In addition, Dr. Shea has authored more than 240 scientific papers and book chapters.

  • Jeanne Shen

    Jeanne Shen

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastrointestinal and pancreatobiliary pathology, with major emphasis on GI and pancreatic neoplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, biodesign innovation, and the application of machine learning to digital pathology.

  • Kang Shen

    Kang Shen

    Vincent V.C. Woo Director, Wu Tsai Neuroscience Institute, Frank Lee and Carol Hall Professor and Professor of Biology and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe connectivity of a neuron (its unique constellation of synaptic inputs and outputs) is essential for its function. Neuronal connections are made with exquisite accuracy between specific types of neurons. How each neuron finds its synaptic partners has been a central question in developmental neurobiology. We utilize the relatively simple nervous system of nematode C. elegans, to search for molecules that can specify synaptic connections and understand the molecular mechanisms of synaptic as

  • Krishna Shenoy

    Krishna Shenoy

    Hong Seh and Vivian W. M. Lim Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology, of Bioengineering and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe conduct neuroscience, neuroengineering and translational research to better understand how the brain controls movement, and to design medical systems to assist people with paralysis. These are referred to as brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and intra-cortical neural prostheses. We conduct this research as part of our Neural Prosthetic Systems Lab (NPSL) and our Neural Prosthetics Translational Lab (NPTL), which I co-direct with Prof. Jaimie Henderson, M.D.

  • Sheri D. Sheppard

    Sheri D. Sheppard

    Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioSheri Sheppard teaches both undergraduate and graduate design-related classes, and conducts research on fracture mechanics and applied finite element analysis, and on how people become engineers. From 1999-2008 she served as a Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, leading the Foundation’s engineering study. In addition to publishing technical papers, reports, and textbooks, she has led or co-led several large, multi-institutional projects to build new educational research programs and related resources, such as the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE), The National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter), and a program on summer research experiences for high school teachers. Her industry experience includes engineering positions at Detroit's "Big Three” — Ford Motor Company, General Motors Corporation, and Chrysler Corporation. She earned her bachelors degree from the University of Wisconsin, and her PhD at the University of Michigan. At Stanford she has served a chair of the faculty senate, as associate vice provost for graduate education, and is the longtime faculty founder of and adviser to the graduate student group MEwomen. Her work has been recognized with numerous honors and awards, including the Walter J. Gores Award, Stanford University's highest award for excellence in teaching and the Chester F. Carlson and Ralph Coats Roe Awards of the American Society for Engineering Education in recognition of distinguished accomplishment in engineering education, and for outstanding teaching and notable contributions to the mechanical engineering profession.

  • Gavin Sherlock

    Gavin Sherlock

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvolution and the adaptive landscape using yeast as a model; Defining yeast transcriptomes; chromosomal evolution in hybrid yeast species

  • Aditi Sheshadri

    Aditi Sheshadri

    Assistant Professor of Earth System Science and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioI joined Stanford's Earth System Science department as an assistant professor 2018. Prior to this, I was a a Junior Fellow of the Simons Foundation in New York, and a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University’s Department of Applied Physics and Applied Math and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. I got my Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science at MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, in the Program for Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate, where I worked with R. Alan Plumb. I’m broadly interested in atmosphere and ocean dynamics, climate variability, and general circulation.

    I'm particularly interested in fundamental questions in atmospheric dynamics, which I address using a combination of theory, observations, and both idealized and comprehensive numerical experiments. Current areas of focus include the dynamics, variability, and change of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks and the stratospheric polar vortex.

  • Vipul Sheth

    Vipul Sheth

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Body MRI)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests are in the development and translation of imaging technologies geared toward disease detection and characterization to better guide prognosis, treatment, and improve outcomes. I’m interested in supporting the development of MRI guided focal therapy methods which can personalize treatment and reduce the risk of morbidity from more invasive therapies.

    Clinical Interests

    - MRI for diagnosis of pelvic floor disorders
    - MRI and PET/MRI to pelvic malignancies and lymph node staging.
    - Whole Body MRI
    - MRI guided procedures including biopsies, cryoablation, and high intensity focused ultrasound.

    Translational Research Interests

    - Development and translation of magnetic resonance imaging technologies to improve both diagnostics and therapeutics
    - Molecular imaging and characterization of the tumor microenvironment
    - Ultrashort echo time MRI applications in the body
    - Developing synergistic MRI methods to complement PET in potential applications for PET/MRI

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe timing for intervention in obstruction in the infant and child is poorly understood.Our group has been interested in trying to define the risks that may be involved in obstructive and infectious uropathies and discovering early signs of damage to the urinary tract and kidney. We have explored ways of imaging the urinary tract using nonionizing radiation (US, MRI). We have studied the relationships of sex steroid hormones, pregnancy, reflux, urinary tract infection and urinary tract function.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn clinical research, Dr. Shrager studies outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, diaphragm plication, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    Dr. Shrager's lab is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Surbhi Sidana, MD

    Surbhi Sidana, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Sidana is a hematologist/oncologist who is fellowship trained in advanced hematology with an emphasis on myeloma, amyloidosis, and dysproteinemia disorders. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation & Cellular Therapy, at Stanford University School of Medicine. She leads the Myeloma Cellular Immunotherapy program at Stanford.

    Her areas of expertise include transplantation and novel cellular immunotherapies such as CAR-T-cell therapy for patients with multiple myeloma. For each patient, Dr. Sidana develops a personalized care plan designed to optimize outcomes and quality of life.

    Dr. Sidana conducts extensive research. Currently, she is conducting clinical trials of CAR-T therapy and bispecific T-cell engagers for treatment of patients with myeloma. She is studying patients’ access to CAR-T cell therapy, the financial burden of the treatment, and its impact on patients’ quality of life and cognitive function.

    Dr Sidana has received a grant from the Stanford Medicine Cancer Institute and NIH funding through the Stanford KL2 program to study adverse events of CAR-T therapy on patients and monitoring of patients undergoing CAR-T therapy using wearable devices.

    In the past, Dr. Sidana received Conquer Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology for her research on the impact of clinical trial participation on patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma. She has also received grants from the Amyloidosis Foundation and International Waldenstrom’s Macrogloulinemia Foundation to understand AL amyloidosis, a rare disease caused by buildup of an abnormal protein.

    Dr. Sidana has given presentations at regional and national conferences and her work has been published in high-impact journals.

    Dr. Sidana has been recognized for her work with many honors, including an Outstanding Hematology/Oncology Fellow award and Outstanding Research Fellow award from the Mayo Clinic.

    She is a member of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, International Myeloma Society, International Society of Amyloidosis, and American Society of Transplantation & Cellular Therapy. Dr. Sidana is often an invited speaker at patient support groups as well as symposia and workshops for her peers.

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    BioJulia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology and Obstetrics and Gynecology in Maternal Fetal Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford’s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Laura Simons

    Laura Simons

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe primary goal of my research is to promote the health and well being of children and adolescents with chronic pain and their families. In line with this goal, research projects focus on biological, neurological, cognitive, affective, and social risk and resiliency factors of the pain experience. Projects include brain imaging, longitudinal clinical cohort, and treatment interventions studies.

    Some current research orojects include:

    Learning and Memory in Pediatric Chronic Pain
    Funding: NIH/NICHD R01
    Description: Investigating the mechanisms underlying fear learning, extinction and disruption of fear reconsolidation in adolescents with chronic pain and health controls using behavioral and neuroimaging measures. Multi-site study with Boston Children's Hospital (Collaborator: David Borsook, MD).

    Children Pain Behaviors in Context: A functional-cognitive perspective
    Leading Site: University of Ghent (Collaborator: Liesbet Goubert, PhD)
    Description: Identifying key antecedents and consequences that give rise to and maintain children's pain-related behaviors and investigate impact these antecedents on children's behavior and functioning through daily surveys and activity monitoring.

  • Bob Sinclair

    Bob Sinclair

    Charles M. Pigott Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioUsing high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Sinclair studies microelectronic and magnetic thin film microstructure.

  • Kuldev Singh, MD, MPH

    Kuldev Singh, MD, MPH

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlaucoma, clinical epidemiology

  • Manpreet K. Singh, MD MS

    Manpreet K. Singh, MD MS

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Singh conducts research in the phenomenology, neurobiology, pharmacology, and genetic aspects of depression and bipolar disorder in children. These studies include brain imaging (MRI, MRS, fMRI), medication, and psychotherapy trials. She is particularly interested in risk factors for the development of major mood disorders and associated morbidities, and early intervention strategies to delay the onset and progression of symptoms.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Infectious Disease and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • Sidhartha Sinha

    Sidhartha Sinha

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThere are two primary and overlapping emphases of my research, both of which are driven and united by needs-based innovation and translational potential:

    (1) Understanding the microenvironment of the inflamed versus normal gut in order to identify better therapeutic targets for people with immune-¬mediated GI disorders. Here, our investigations include understanding the influence and interactions of pharmacologic and dietary interventions on gut microbiome/metabolomic changes and the host immune response. In the context of providing patients with new understanding and solutions for their disease, I have led and advised on the design of both pilot and large clinical trials (including new FDA approved therapies) for anti-inflammatory therapies;

    (2) Applying novel approaches and technologies (including natural language processing, computer vision, and reinforcement learning) to identify and address unmet clinical needs. In this area we have ongoing and published efforts in my lab to validate and develop solutions to pressing clinical needs. We have developed/led new drug delivery technologies with a multidisciplinary team that have shown strong potential in ongoing human IBD clinical trials. My lab has utilized both supervised and unsupervised approaches to analyze social media discourse and unstructured data sets for identifying patient needs that are rarely addressed in clinical settings. We have gained insights into patient perceptions around preventative health interventions, such as health screening and diet, including the dearth of evidence-based dietary recommendations to treat IBD (despite strong patient desire for solutions in this domain).

  • Georgios Skiniotis

    Georgios Skiniotis

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Structural Biology and of Photon Science

    BioThe Skiniotis laboratory seeks to resolve structural and mechanistic questions underlying biological processes that are central to cellular physiology. Our investigations employ primarily cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and 3D reconstruction techniques complemented by biochemistry, biophysics and simulation methods to obtain a dynamic view into the macromolecular complexes carrying out these processes. The main theme in the lab is the structural biology of cell surface receptors that mediate intracellular signaling and communication. Our current main focus is the exploration of the mechanisms responsible for transmembrane signal instigation in cytokine receptors and G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Jan Skotheim

    Jan Skotheim

    Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overarching goal is to understand how cell growth triggers cell division. Linking growth to division is important because it allows cells to maintain specific size range to best perform their physiological functions. For example, red blood cells must be small enough to flow through small capillaries, whereas macrophages must be large enough to engulf pathogens. In addition to being important for normal cell and tissue physiology, the link between growth and division is misregulated in cancer.

  • Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Smith is a board-certified, fellowship-trained medical oncologist and hematologist. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

    She is a physician-scientist who conducts extensive research. She completed a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Clinical Research Training (now, the Medical Research Scholars) Program and she was a post-doctoral researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Her research focuses on studies evaluating strategies whereby donor T cells can be administered to improve outcomes following blood and marrow transplant. Specifically, she studies novel treatment strategies using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy.

    Dr. Smith has been invited to present the findings of her research at regional, national, and international conferences. At the Insights in Hematology Conference, she focused on the use of CAR T cells for blood cancers, whereas she presented her investigations on the associations between CAR T cells and the intestinal microbiome at the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Further, at the annual meeting of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy, she addressed the importance of training scientists from underrepresented populations.

    Dr. Smith has co-authored articles on topics within the field of cancer immunology, including cancer immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and CAR T cell therapy. Her work has appeared in journals, including Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood Advances, Leukemia, Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Medicine, and elsewhere.

    She serves a peer reviewer for publications in various journals, such as Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Haematologica, and ImmunoMedicine. She also has co-written chapters in books, including Pocket Oncology, Current Concepts and Controversies in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, and Advanced Concepts in Human Immunology: Prospects for Disease Control.

    Dr. Smith has also earned numerous honors. The American Society of Hematology, Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and many other professional societies and organizations have recognized her achievements as a clinician, researcher, and scholar.

    She is a member of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Subcommittee on Immunotherapy and the co-chair of the Committee on Trainees and Junior Faculty for the American Society of Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (ASTCT). Other positions in service to professional organizations include co-chairing committees and task forces dedicated to promoting diversity among hematology and cell therapy specialists.

  • Robert Lane Smith

    Robert Lane Smith

    Professor (Research) of Orthopedic Surgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group is interested in the molecular and cell biology underlying bone and cartilage metabolism in health and disease. Normal daily activities are linked to the ability of the articular cartilage to withstand normal joint forces that may reach 5-7 times body weight and bone homeostasis depends on daily mechanical loading histories.

  • Stephen J Smith

    Stephen J Smith

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in the Smith Laboratory addresses basic mechanisms and and disorders of brain function. Present efforts are focused on the development and application of new proteomic imaging methods to explore the circuit and molecular architectures of memory storage and retrieval in cerebral cortex.

  • Matthew Smuck, MD

    Matthew Smuck, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI direct the Wearable Health Lab at Stanford, investigating medical applications of mobile technology to improve musculoskeletal and neurologic disease detection, treatment and prevention.

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Samuel So, MD

    Samuel So, MD

    Lui Hac Minh Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThrough a 4 pronged comprehensive program: translational and clinical research, early detection and treatment, promoting education, awareness and immunization and building partnership, we are working towards the development of new strategies that will lead to the elimination of hepatitis B worldwide and reduce the threat and incidence of liver cancer. Current research efforts focus on evaluating potential new diagnostic and treatment markers and novel targeted therapy for primary liver cancer.

  • Yuen So, MD, PhD

    Yuen So, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of peripheral neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, motor neuron diseases including ALS and SMA, nerve injuries and muscle diseases. Application of clinical neurophysiological methods to neurological diagnosis. Development of evidence-based medicine pertaining to the practice of neurology.

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    BioDr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.

  • Olav Solgaard

    Olav Solgaard

    Director, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioThe Solgaard group focus on design and fabrication of nano-photonics and micro-optical systems. We combine photonic crystals, optical meta-materials, silicon photonics, and MEMS, to create efficient and reliable systems for communication, sensing, imaging, and optical manipulation.

  • Edward I. Solomon

    Edward I. Solomon

    Monroe E. Spaght Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Photon Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Solomon's work spans physical-inorganic, bioinorganic, and theoretical-inorganic chemistry, focusing on spectroscopic elucidation of the electronic structure of transition metal complexes and its contribution to reactivity. He has advanced our understanding of metal sites involved in electron transfer, copper sites involved in O2 binding, activation and reduction to water, structure/function correlations over non-heme iron enzymes, and correlation of biological to heterogeneous catalysis.

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    BioIvan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • George Somero

    George Somero

    David and Lucile Packard Professor in Marine Science, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe examine two aspects of organism-environment interactions: How does stress from physical (e.g., temperature) and chemical (oxygen levels, pH) factors perturb organisms and how do organisms respond, adaptively, to cope with this stress? We examine evolutionary adaptation and phenotypic acclimatization using a wide variety of marine animals, including Antarctic fishes and invertebrates from intertidal habitats on the coastlines of temperate and tropical seas.

  • Geoffrey Sonn

    Geoffrey Sonn

    Associate Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Body MRI)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interest is in improving prostate cancer diagnosis through MRI and image-targeted prostate biopsy. In collaboration with radiologists at Stanford, we are working to define the optimal role of MRI in prostate cancer. We hope to improve cancer imaging to the point that some men with elevated PSA may safely avoid prostate biopsy. For those who need biopsy, we are evaluating novel MRI-US fusion targeted biopsy, a technique that greatly improves upon the conventional biopsy method.

  • Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goals of the Sonnenburg Lab research program are to (i) elucidate the basic mechanisms that underlie dynamics within the gut microbiota and (ii) devise and implement strategies to prevent and treat disease in humans via the gut microbiota. We investigate the principles that govern gut microbial community function and interaction with the host using a broad range of experimental approaches including studies of microbiomes in diverse human cohorts.

  • Andrew Spakowitz

    Andrew Spakowitz

    Professor of Chemical Engineering, of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheory and computation of biological processes and complex materials

  • Erik Sperling

    Erik Sperling

    Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences, by courtesy, of Oceans and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research interests in the Sperling Lab are Earth history and the evolution of life, and the interactions between the biosphere and the geosphere. As such this research can generally be considered paleontology, insofar as paleontology encompasses all aspects of the history of life.

    Consequently, we define our research agenda by the questions we are interested in, rather than the tools used. This research incorporates multiple lines of evidence, and multiple tools, to investigate questions in the history of life. These lines of evidence include fossil data, molecular phylogenetics, sedimentary geochemistry, and developmental and ecological data from modern organisms. Ultimately, the goal is to link environmental change with organismal and ecological response through the lens of physiology.

    Our field research takes place all over the world--current areas include:

    -NW Canada (Yukon and Northwest Territories): Research has been conducted on the early Neoproterozoic Fifteenmile Group, Cryogenian and Ediacaran Windermere Supergroup, and on the Ordovician-Devonian Road River Group in the southern Richardson Mountains
    -Southern Canadian Cordillera: Work here has focused on the early Cambrian Mural Formation and its soft-bodied fauna.
    -England and Wales: Cambrian-Silurian successions in the Welsh Basin
    -Namibia: Ediacaran Nama Group
    -Upwelling zones: We study the oxygen minimum zone offshore California as an analogue for ancient low-oxygen oceans.

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMP signaling
    BMP signaling in health and disease in the right ventricle of the heart
    "BMP signature" in blood as a biomarker
    BMP signaling in neonatal chronic lung disease