Bio-X


Showing 41-60 of 929 Results

  • Mohsen Bayati

    Mohsen Bayati

    Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Healthcare management: I am interested in improving healthcare delivery using data-driven modeling and decision-making.

    2) Network models and message-passing algorithms: I work on graphical modeling ideas motivated from statistical physics and their applications in statistical inference.

    3) Personalized decision-making: I work on machine learning and statistical challenges of personalized decision-making. The problems that I have worked on are primarily motivated by healthcare applications.

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Urology, of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunction of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformatics and image processing techniques that provide infrastructure for diagnosis in musculoskeletal imaging. Decision support for improving accuracy of bone tumor diagnosis. Improved methods for MRI in the musculoskeletal system.

  • Barry Behr, Ph.D., H.C.L.D.

    Barry Behr, Ph.D., H.C.L.D.

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    On Leave from 08/01/2020 To 08/31/2020

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment of improved embryo culture conditions in vitro. Blastocyst cultures. Embryo metabolism in vitro. Embryo maternal dialogue. Clinical application and integration of extended embryo culture systems. Monozygotic twinning. Prevention of multiple pregnancy. Sperm motility enhancers. Fluorescent and non-fluorescent markers of sperm morphology and viablility. Oocyte cryopreservation. Fertility preservation. Improving IVF outcome.

  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bejerano, co-discoverer of ultraconserved elements, studies the Human Genome. His research focuses on genome sequence and function in both humans and related primate, mammalian and vertebrate species. He is deeply interested in mapping both coding and non-coding genome sequence variation to phenotype differences, and in extracting specific genetic insights from high throughput sequencing measurements, in the contexts of development and developmental abnormalities.

  • Sean Bendall

    Sean Bendall

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to understand the mechanisms regulating the development of human systems. Drawing on both pluripotent stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and immunology, combined with novel high-content single-cell analysis (CyTOF – Mass Cytometry) and imagining (MIBI-Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging) we are creating templates of ‘normal’ human cellular behavior to both discover novel regulatory events and cell populations as well as understand dysfunctional processes such as cancer.

  • Eran Bendavid

    Eran Bendavid

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health), Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEffect of global health policies on health of individuals in developing countries, global health, HIV and TB.

  • Stacey Bent

    Stacey Bent

    Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs, Jagdeep and Roshni Singh Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science & Engineering, of Electrical Engineering and of Chemistry

    BioThe research in the Bent laboratory is focused on understanding and controlling surface and interfacial chemistry and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in semiconductor processing, micro- and nano-electronics, nanotechnology, and sustainable and renewable energy. Much of the research aims to develop a molecular-level understanding in these systems, and hence the group uses of a variety of molecular probes. Systems currently under study in the group include functionalization of semiconductor surfaces, mechanisms and control of atomic layer deposition, molecular layer deposition, nanoscale materials for light absorption, interface engineering in photovoltaics, catalyst and electrocatalyst deposition.

  • Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMS

    Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMS

    Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor
    On Partial Leave from 06/01/2020 To 05/31/2021

    BioLaurie Kraus Lacob Professor
    Stanford University School of Medicine

    Director, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center
    Senior Advisor, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Director, Stanford Health Communication Initiative
    Advancing Communication Excellence at Stanford
    Stanford Center for Health Education
    Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning
    Stanford University

    Director, Stanford Health Care Communication Program
    Stanford Health Care

  • Jonathan Berger

    Jonathan Berger

    Denning Family Provostial Professor

    BioJonathan Berger is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford University, where he teaches composition, music theory, and cognition at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).
    Jonathan is a 2017 Guggenheim Fellow and a 2016 winner of the Rome Prize.
    He was the founding co-director of the Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SICA, now the Stanford Arts Institute) and founding director of Yale University’s Center for Studies in Music Technology
    Described as “gripping” by both the New York Times and the Chicago Tribune, “poignant”, “richly evocative” (San Francisco Chronicle), “taut, and hauntingly beautiful” (NY Times), Jonathan Berger’s recent works deal with both consciousness and conscience. The Kronos Quartet toured recent monodrama, My Lai internationally. Thrice commissioned by The National Endowment for the Arts, Berger’a recent commissions include The Mellon and Rockefeller Foundations, Chamber Music Society, Lincoln Center, and Chamber Music America. Upcoming commissions include an oratorio entitled The Ritual of Breath, and Leonardo, for baritone and chamber orchestra.
    In addition to composition, Berger is an active researcher with over 80 publications in a wide range of fields relating to music, science and technology and has held research grants from DARPA, the Wallenberg Foundation, The National Academy of Sciences, the Keck Foundation, and others.

  • Dominique Bergmann

    Dominique Bergmann

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetic, genomic and cell biological approaches to study cell fate acquisition, focusing on cases where cell fate is correlated with asymmetric cell division.

  • Rebecca Bernert

    Rebecca Bernert

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Bernert is Founding Director of the Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory, and Co-Chairs a special departmental initiative to develop a Center for Premature Mortality and Suicide Prevention. She is a suicidologist, with subspecialty expertise in suicide prevention clinical trials, standardized suicide risk assessment and best practice management, and the epidemiology of self-directed violence. She has subspecialty training in behavioral sleep medicine, with a background in sleep and circadian physiology. Her program utilizes cognitive, biologic (e.g., fMRI), and behavioral testing paradigms, with an emphasis on translational therapeutics. Dr. Bernert has collaborated with NIH, DOD, DARPA, SAMHSA, and CDC on suicide prevention initiatives; and recently served as a content expert for the White House 2015 Open Data and Innovation for Suicide Prevention #Hackathon. She has also contributed to the development of clinical practice parameters, including the 2013 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Assessment and Management of Suicide Risk, with current work underway focused on investigating medical education training in suicide risk assessment and management. Her research focuses on the identification of novel therapeutic targets for suicide prevention across the lifespan, particularly those aiming to reduce stigma and enhance access to care. A specific focus of this work emphasizes the use of rapid-action, low-risk treatment approaches for the prevention of suicide. Dr. Bernert has several suicide prevention trials underway, funded by NIH and DOD, testing the preliminary efficacy of a non pharmacological insomnia treatment on suicidal behaviors. She also has several grants focused on the development of a data monitoring system for the study of local suicide clusters and emergency department based protocols to improve risk detection within pediatric suicide prevention. Our aim is to delineate transdiagnostic risk factors and biomarkers of clinical response that may inform the pathogenesis of risk and treatment innovation. An overarching mission is to harness new technologies within suicide prevention, including artificial intelligence (AI) and mobile health applications, to enhance risk detection and multidisciplinary frameworks. Advisory and advocacy work, and the way in which research guides health policy, dissemination, and national strategies for suicide prevention, represents an extension of this work. This includes recent initiatives to establish national and local guidelines for lethal means restriction and calls for advanced technology use in suicide prevention research and strategy. Last, Dr. Bernert has several pilot projects underway focused on inclusive practices in faculty diversity and development, and the way in which family-friendly policies impact faculty recruitment and retention in academic medicine.

  • Daniel Bernstein

    Daniel Bernstein

    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel Smith Salter Endowed Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to understand hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure associated with congenital heart disease.
    2. Role of alterations in mitochondrial dycamics and function in normal physiology and disease.
    3. Differences between R and L ventricular responses to stress,
    4. Immune biomarkers of risk after pediatric VAD implantation.
    5. Biomarkers for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Jon Bernstein

    Jon Bernstein

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on the diagnosis, discovery and delineation of rare genetic conditions with a focus of neurodevelopmental disorders. This work includes the application of novel computational methods and multi-omics profiling (whole genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, metabolomics). I additionally participate in an interdisciplinary project to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of genetic neurodevelopmental disorders..

  • Michael Bernstein

    Michael Bernstein

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioMichael Bernstein is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and STMicroelectronics Faculty Scholar at Stanford University, where he is a member of the Human-Computer Interaction group. His research focuses on the design of social computing and crowdsourcing systems. Michael has received eight best paper awards at premier computing venues, and he has been recognized with an NSF CAREER award and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship. His Ph.D. students have gone on both to industry (e.g., Adobe Research, Facebook Data Science, entrepreneurship) and faculty careers (e.g., Carnegie Mellon, UC Berkeley). Michael holds a bachelor's degree in Symbolic Systems from Stanford University, as well as a master's degree and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT.

  • William Berquist

    William Berquist

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastroenterology, gastointestinal motility, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  • Mark Berry, MD

    Mark Berry, MD

    Mylavarapu Rogers Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Berry joined the Division of Thoracic Surgery at Stanford in August 2014. He came to Stanford from Duke University, where he had most recently served as Associate Professor. He received his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine after receiving bachelors and masters degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Duke University Medical Center after performing a residency in General Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. His Cardiothoracic Surgical training included a year dedicated to Minimally Invasive General Thoracic Surgery, a period that also included an American Association for Thoracic Surgery sponsored Traveling Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Dr. Berry practices all aspects of thoracic surgery, including procedures for benign and malignant conditions of the lung, esophagus, and mediastinum. He has a particular interest in minimally invasive techniques, and has extensive experience in treating thoracic surgical conditions using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS), laparoscopic, robotic, endoscopic, and bronchoscopic approaches. He serves as the co-Director of the Stanford Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Center (SMITS), and has both directed and taught in several minimally invasive thoracic surgery courses.

    Dr. Berry also has a Masters of Health Sciences in Clinical Research from Duke University. His clinical research activities mirror his clinical interests and activities in optimizing short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with thoracic surgical conditions. He has more than sixty peer-reviewed publications, most of which are related to both the use of minimally invasive thoracic surgical techniques as well as evaluating outcomes after treatment of thoracic malignancies. His clinical practice and his research both focus on choosing the most appropriate treatment and approach for patients based on the individual characteristics of the patient and their disease process.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmolecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Alice Bertaina MD, PhD

    Alice Bertaina MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bertaina is a highly experienced clinician and will play a key role in supporting Section Chief Dr. Rajni Agarwal and Clinical Staff in the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. She will also continue her research on immune recovery and miRNA, understanding the mechanisms underlying immune reconstitution, Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT in pediatric patients affected by hematological malignant and non-malignant disorders.