Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)


Showing 201-220 of 276 Results

  • Kilian M Pohl

    Kilian M Pohl

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Labs and Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe foundation of the laboratory of Associate Professor Kilian M. Pohl, PhD, is computational science aimed at identifying biomedical phenotypes improving the mechanistic understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The biomedical phenotypes are discovered by unbiased, machine learning-based searches across biological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological data. This data-driven discovery currently supports the adolescent brain research of the NIH-funded National Consortium on Alcohol and NeuroDevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) and the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD), the largest long-term study of brain development and child health in the US. The laboratory also investigates brain patterns specific to alcohol use disorder and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) across the adult age range, and have advanced the understanding of a variety of brain diseases including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, glioma, and aging.

  • Christine Raval

    Christine Raval

    Research Program Manager, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioChristine is a member of the research team at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI (HAI). She manages the HAI grant programs, student affinity initiative, and the operations of AI100, a 100-year effort to study and anticipate how the effects of AI will ripple through every aspect of how people work, live and play. Prior to joining Stanford, Christine worked on the digital learning team at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and as a case manager for newly arrived refugees in Omaha. Christine graduated with a Master of Public Administration from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a BA in Justice and Society from Creighton University.

  • Christopher Re

    Christopher Re

    Associate Professor of Computer Science
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAlgorithms, systems, and theory for the next generation of data processing and data analytics systems.

  • Rob Reich

    Rob Reich

    McGregor-Girand Professor of Social Ethics of Science and Technology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI. Professor, by courtesy, of Education, of Philosophy and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at FSI
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioRob Reich is professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy and at the Graduate School of Education. He is a co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (publisher of the Stanford Social Innovation Review), and associate director of the Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. He was faculty director at the Center for Ethics in Society for eight years, and he continues to lead its ethics and technology initiatives.

    His scholarship in political theory engages with the work of social scientists and engineers. His newest work is on ethics and AI. His most recent books are System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot (with Mehran Sahami and Jeremy M. Weinstein, HarperCollins 2021) and Digital Technology and Democratic Theory (edited with Lucy Bernholz and Hélène Landemore, University of Chicago Press 2021). He has also written widely about philanthropy, including Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better (Princeton University Press, 2018) and Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values (edited with Chiara Cordelli and Lucy Bernholz, University of Chicago Press, 2016). His early work is focused on democracy and education, including Bridging Liberalism and Multiculturalism in American Education (University of Chicago Press, 2002) and Education, Justice, and Democracy (edited with Danielle Allen, University of Chicago Press, 2013). He has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, Wired, The Guardian, and the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

    Rob is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores award, Stanford’s highest honor for teaching. He was a sixth grade teacher at Rusk Elementary School in Houston, Texas before attending graduate school. He is a board member of the magazine Boston Review, of Giving Tuesday, and at the Spencer Foundation.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Fatima Rodriguez

    Fatima Rodriguez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioFatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine and (by courtesy) the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Dr. Rodriguez earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School and her MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. She then completed internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowship in cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University. She currently serves as the Section Chief of Preventive Cardiology. Dr. Rodriguez specializes in cardiovascular disease prevention, inherited lipid disorders, and cardiovascular risk assessment in high-risk populations.

    Dr. Rodriguez’s research includes a range of topics around racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in cardiovascular disease prevention, developing novel interventions to address disparities, and opportunistic screening of coronary artery disease.

  • Daniel Rubin

    Daniel Rubin

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is imaging informatics--ways computers can work with images to leverage their rich information content and to help physicians use images to guide personalized care. Work in our lab thus lies at the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science.

  • Ahmad Rushdi

    Ahmad Rushdi

    Senior Manager of Research Collaborations, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioAhmad A. Rushdi is a Sr. Research Manager at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI (HAI). He works with the diverse machine learning, deep learning, and artificial intelligence communities across Stanford and the corporate world, in order to envision, build, and maintain new bridges around cutting-edge research that would create useful and trusted systems for a variety of AI applications.

    Dr. Rushdi's research interests include statistical signal processing and uncertainty quantification methods applied to machine learning models trained on time-series and real/synthetic image datasets. His publications span system design, communications, genomics, meshing, and national security applications.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Ahmad was a research scientist at the Center for Computing Research of Sandia National Laboratories, an R&D manager of data science at Northrop Grumman Corporation, a research fellow at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of UC Davis and the Computational Visualization Center under Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at UT Austin, and an R&D engineer at Cisco Systems.

    Ahmad holds a PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of California, Davis, and MSc/BSc degrees in Electrical Engineering from Cairo University.

  • Mehran Sahami

    Mehran Sahami

    Tencent Chair of the of the Computer Science Department, James and Ellenor Chesebrough Professor and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioMehran Sahami is Tencent Chair of the Computer Science Department and the James and Ellenor Chesebrough Professor in the School of Engineering. As a Professor (Teaching) in the Computer Science department, he is also a Bass Fellow in Undergraduate Education and previously served as the Associate Chair for Education in Computer Science. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he was a Senior Research Scientist at Google. His research interests include computer science education, artificial intelligence, and ethics. He served as co-chair of the ACM/IEEE-CS joint task force on Computer Science Curricula 2013, which created curricular guidelines for college programs in Computer Science at an international level. He has also served as chair of the ACM Education Board, an elected member of the ACM Council, and was appointed by California Governor Jerry Brown to the state's Computer Science Strategic Implementation Plan Advisory Panel.

  • Aadesh Salecha

    Aadesh Salecha

    Data Scientist, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioAadesh Salecha is a computer scientist who works on integrating Artificial Intelligence and Psychology. He graduated from the University of Minnesota, where he worked with Prof. Jaideep Srivastava on misinformation spread and its mitigation mechanisms. At Stanford, he works with Prof. Johannes Eichsteadt on using cognitive psychology and psychometrics to understand bias development in Large Language Models. He is also collaborating the effort on the creation of new-age psychological interventions using AI to democratize access and improve personalization and retention. His work is focused on using computational methods for societal good by facilitating the measurement and causal analysis of population health metrics like drug abuse, subjective-wellbeing, etc.

  • Ian Sato

    Ian Sato

    Program Manager, Education, Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioIan Sato (he/him) is the education program manager at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. He is responsible for the curation, management, and execution of HAI's education programs across various learner groups such as executives, government officials, and healthcare professionals. He aspires to help audiences from diverse backgrounds gain perspective on the potential of human-centered AI to support its ethical application and ensure a more equitable future for humankind.

    Prior to joining HAI, Ian spent a decade working in education abroad, most recently as a director of academic affairs at Hult EF Corporate Education. In this role, he consulted with government and corporate entities operating in the Asia Pacific region as a thought leader in education, with a particular focus on the development of effective hybrid and virtual programs. Prior to that he worked in roles across the academic spectrum in research and teaching roles for K-12, university, corporate, and executive learning audiences.

    Ian earned his B.A. in Philosophy from DePaul University and M.A. in Philosophy from University of Oregon.

  • Londa Schiebinger

    Londa Schiebinger

    John L. Hinds Professor of the History of Science

    BioLonda Schiebinger is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science in the History Department at Stanford University and Director of the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment Project. From 2004-2010, Schiebinger served as the Director of Stanford's Clayman Institute for Gender Research. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Professor Schiebinger received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1984 and is a leading international authority on gender in science and technology. Over the past thirty years, Schiebinger's work has been devoted to teasing apart three analytically distinct but interlocking pieces of the gender and science puzzle: the history of women's participation in science; gender in the structure of scientific institutions; and the gendering of human knowledge.

    Londa Schiebinger presented the keynote address and wrote the conceptual background paper for the United Nations' Expert Group Meeting on Gender, Science, and Technology, September 2010 in Paris. She presented the findings at the United Nations in New York, February 2011 with an update spring 2014. In 2022, she prepared the background paper for the United Nations 67th session of the Commission on the Status of Women’s priority theme, Innovation and Technological Change, and Education in the Digital Age for Achieving Gender Equality and The Empowerment of all Women and Girls. Since 2023, Gendered Innovations has been a member of the UNFPA Equity 2030 Alliance.

    In 2011-2014, Schiebinger entered into major collaborations with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation to promote Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment. This project draws experts from across the U.S., Europe, Canada, and Asia, and was presented at the European Parliament, July 2013 as Gendered Innovations: How Gender Analysis Contributes to Research. In 2018-2020, Schiebinger directed the European Commission Expert Group to produce Gendered Innovations 2: How Inclusive Analysis Contributes to Research and Innovation. Institutes for Gendered Innovations research opened in Soeul, South Korea, in 2015 and in Tokyo, Japan, in 2022.

    Schiebinger’s work has been featured in Science: A Framework for Sex, Gender, and Diversity Analysis in Research: Funding Agencies Have Ample Room to Improve Their Policies (2022); Nature: Sex and Gender Analysis Improves Science and Engineering (2019); Nature: Design AI so that it's Fair (2018); Nature: Accounting for Sex and Gender Makes for Better Science (2020).

    Her work in the eighteenth century investigates the circulation of knowledge in the Atlantic World. Her Secret Cures of Slaves: People, Plants, and Medicine in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World reconceptualizes research in four areas: first and foremost knowledge of African contributions to early modern science; the historiography of race in science; the history of human experimentation; and the role of science in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. Her prize-winning Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World investigates women's indigenous knowledge of abortifacients and why this knowledge did not travel.

    Londa Schiebinger has been the recipient of numerous prizes and awards, including the prestigious Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize and John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. She was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium (2013), the Faculty of Science, Lund University, Sweden (2017), and the University of Valencia, Spain (2018); the Berlin Falling Walls Breakthrough Winner in Science & Innovation Management (2022). Her work has been translated into numerous languages. In 2022/23, she served as an advisor to the Berlin University Alliance.

  • Dustin Schroeder

    Dustin Schroeder

    Associate Professor of Geophysics, of Electrical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMy research focuses on advancing the scientific and technical foundations of geophysical ice penetrating radar and its use in observing and understanding the interaction of ice and water in the solar system. I am primarily interested in the subglacial and englacial conditions of rapidly changing ice sheets and their contribution to global sea level rise. However, a growing secondary focus of my work is the exploration of icy moons. I am also interested in the development and application of science-optimized geophysical radar systems. I consider myself a radio glaciologist and strive to approach problems from both an earth system science and a radar system engineering perspective. I am actively engaged with the flow of information through each step of the observational science process; from instrument and experiment design, through data processing and analysis, to modeling and inference. This allows me to draw from a multidisciplinary set of tools to test system-scale and process-level hypotheses. For me, this deliberate integration of science and engineering is the most powerful and satisfying way to approach questions in Earth and planetary science.