School of Engineering


Showing 21-40 of 62 Results

  • Warren Hausman

    Warren Hausman

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Hausman performs research in operations planning and control, with specific interests in supply chain management. Most of his contributions are based upon quantitative modeling techniques and emphasize relevance and real world applicability.

    He has recently studied how RFID technology can revolutionize the management of supply chains. He has investigated the value of RFID applications in retail environments, in logistics, and in manufacturing and assembly operations. He has also studied how Supply Flexibility in retail supply chains affects a company's financial performance and market capitalization.

    He is an active consultant to industry and is involved in numerous executive education programs both at Stanford and around the world. He was the founding director of a two-day executive program on Integrated Supply Chain Management held semi-annually in Palo Alto, California from 1994 to 2003. His consulting clients represent the following industries: general manufacturing, electronics, computers, consumer products, food & beverage, transportation, healthcare, and high technology. He is also a co-founder of Supply Chain Online, which provides web-based corporate supply chain management training. He serves on the technical advisory boards of several Silicon Valley startups. He has also served as an Expert Witness for litigation involving operations management

    In 1994 he was elected President of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA). He has also served on the Board of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) and on several National Science Foundation Advisory Panels and Committees. He is a Fellow of INFORMS, a Distinguished Fellow of the Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Society, and a Fellow of the Production & Operations Management Society. He has also won several teaching awards, including the Eugene Grant Teaching Award in Stanford's School of Engineering in 1998.

    He earned a BA in Economics from Yale and a PhD from MIT's Sloan School of Management.

  • Pamela Hinds

    Pamela Hinds

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioPamela J. Hinds is Fortinet Founders Chair and Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Co-Director of the Center on Work, Technology, and Organization and on the Director's Council for the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design.. She studies the effect of technology on teams, collaboration, and innovation. Pamela has conducted extensive research on the dynamics of cross-boundary work teams, particularly those spanning national borders. She explores issues of culture, language, identity, conflict, and the role of site visits in promoting knowledge sharing and collaboration. She has published extensively on the relationship between national culture and work practices, particularly exploring how work practices or technologies created in one location are understood and employed at distant sites. Pamela also has a body of research on human-robot interaction in the work environment and the dynamics of human-robot teams. Most recently, Pamela has been looking at the changing nature of work in the face of emerging technologies, including the nature of coordination in open innovation, changes in work and organizing resulting from 3D-printing, and the work of data analysts. Her research has appeared in journals such as Organization Science, Research in Organizational Behavior, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Annals, Academy of Management Discoveries, Human-Computer Interaction, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. Pamela is a Senior Editor of Organization Science. She is also co-editor with Sara Kiesler of the book Distributed Work (MIT Press). Pamela holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Science and Management from Carnegie Mellon University.

  • Ronald Howard

    Ronald Howard

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioRonald A. Howard has been Professor in the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems (now the Department of Management Science and Engineering) in the School of Engineering of Stanford University since 1965. Professor Howard is one of the founders of the decision analysis discipline. His books on probabilistic modeling, decision analysis, dynamic programming, and Markov processes serve as major references for courses and research in these fields.

    Professor Howard directs teaching and research in the Decision Analysis Program of the Department of Management Science and Engineering. He also is the Director of the Decisions and Ethics Center, which examines the efficacy and ethics of social arrangements. Professor Howard defined the profession of decision analysis in 1964 and has since supervised several doctoral theses in decision analysis every year. His experience includes dozens of decision analysis projects that range over virtually all fields of application, from investment planning to research strategy, and from hurricane seeding to nuclear waste isolation. He has been a consultant to several companies and was a founding Director and Chairman of Strategic Decisions Group. He is President of the Decision Education Foundation, which he and colleagues founded to teach decision skills to young people.

    He has written four books, dozens of technical papers, and provided editorial service to seven technical journals. He was founding Editor of the Journal of the Society for Scientific Exploration. He has lectured in decision analysis at universities in several foreign countries, including the former Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China. His national society affiliations have included the Operations Research Society of America; the Operational Research Society (U. K.); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (Fellow); the Institute of Management Science, which he served as President, and INFORMS, The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, (Fellow). Current research interests are improving the quality of decisions, life-and-death decision making, and the creation of a coercion-free society.

    In 1986 he received the Operations Research Society of America's Frank P. Ramsey Medal "for Distinguished Contributions in Decision Analysis. In 1998 he received from INFORMS the first award for the Teaching of Operations Research/Management Science Practice. In 1999, this organization invited him to give the Omega Rho Distinguished Plenary Lecture at the Cincinnati National Meeting. In the same year, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and received the Dean's Award for Academic Excellence.

    Professor Howard earned his Sc.D. in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1958. He was Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Associate Professor of Industrial Management, and Associate Director of the Operations Research Center at MIT when he joined the Stanford faculty as Professor in 1965.

  • Hillard Huntington

    Hillard Huntington

    Executive Director, Energy Modeling Forum
    Affiliate, Management Science and Engineering - Energy Modeling Forum

    BioHuntington is Executive Director of Stanford University's Energy Modeling Forum, where he conducts studies to improve the usefulness of models for understanding energy and environmental problems. In 2005 the Forum received the prestigious Adelman-Frankel Award from the International Association for Energy Economics for its "unique and innovative contribution to the field of energy economics."

    His current research interests are modeling energy security, energy price shocks, energy market impacts of environmental policies, and international natural gas and LNG markets. In 2002 he won the Best Paper Award from the Energy Journal for a paper co-authored with Professor Dermot Gately of New York University.

    He is a Senior Fellow and a past-President of the United States Association for Energy Economics and a member of the National Petroleum Council. He was also Vice-President for Publications for the International Association for Energy Economics and a member of the American Statistical Association's Committee on Energy Data. Previously, he served on a joint USA-Russian National Academy of Sciences Panel on energy conservation research and development.

    Huntington has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the California Energy Commission.

    Prior to coming to Stanford in 1980, he held positions in the corporate and government sectors with Data Resources Inc., the U.S. Federal Energy Administration, and the Public Utilities Authority in Monrovia, Liberia (as a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer).

  • Ramesh Johari

    Ramesh Johari

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioJohari is broadly interested in the design, economic analysis, and operation of online platforms, as well as statistical and machine learning techniques used by these platforms (such as search, recommendation, matching, and pricing algorithms).

  • Blake Eliot Johnson

    Blake Eliot Johnson

    Adjunct Professor

    BioBlake Johnson is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering, where he was previously a full-time faculty member. His work focuses on methods for proactively incorporating uncertainty about demand and supply in supply chain planning and performance management, both inside a company and in its relationships with key customers, suppliers and partners.

    Blake has pioneered the development of business capabilities to implement these methods in his work in industry. In 2000 he founded Vivecon, which delivered the first supply planning capabilities of this kind to leading companies in high tech, CPG, automotive and energy, with financing by Texas Pacific Group, Benchmark Capital and Foundational Capital.

    In 2008 he began development of Aztral (which is privately financed) to provide a fully integrated set of capabilities spanning performance management, planning, and operational execution. Large-scale deployment of these capabilities began in 2016. Now validated and refined, they are being delivered through Aztral’s highly automated “self-driving” enterprise analytic capabilities, which ensure optimal performance and extremely efficient implementation. The first capability, Aztral Demand and Forecast, launched in summer 2018.

    Complementary to his work at Aztral, Blake is actively involved in developing best practices for implementing analytics at scale in core operating processes. For the last eight years has hosted an annual event in the Management Science and Engineering Department that brings together industry and academic leaders in the field.

    Blake currently teaches corporate financial management and has also taught capital investment, supply chain risk and flexibility management, and microeconomics. He began his career in investment banking at Credit Suisse in New York, where he was responsible for several categories of asset-backed securities and led the first issues of credit-card asset backed securities in Europe and Japan.

  • Riitta Katila

    Riitta Katila

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe question that drives Prof. Katila's research is how technology-based firms with significant resources can stay innovative. Her work lies at the intersection of the fields of technology, innovation, and strategy and focuses on strategies that enable organizations to discover, develop and commercialize technologies. She combines theory with longitudinal large-sample data (e.g., robotics, biomedical, multi-industry datasets), background fieldwork, and state-of-the-art quantitative methods. The ultimate objective is to understand what makes technology-based firms successful.

    To answer this question, Prof. Katila conducts two interrelated streams of research. She studies (1) strategies that help firms leverage their existing resources (leverage stream), and (2) strategies through which firms can acquire new resources (acquisition stream) to create innovation. Her early contributions were firm centric while recent contributions focus on innovation in the context of competitive interaction.

    Professor Katila's work has appeared in the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Science, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Research Policy and other outlets. In her work, supported by the National Science Foundation, Katila examines how firms create new products successfully. Focusing on the robotics and medical device industries, she investigates how different search approaches, such as the exploitation of existing knowledge and the exploration for new knowledge, influence the kinds of new products that technology-intensive firms introduce. Professor Katila has served on the editorial boards of several leading journals including Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Science, Strategic Organization, and the Strategic Management Journal.

  • Irene Lo

    Irene Lo

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioIrene is an assistant professor in Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. Her research is on designing matching markets and assignment processes to improve market outcomes, with a focus on public sector applications and socially responsible operations research. She is also interested in mechanism design for social good and graph theory.

  • Trevor Loy

    Trevor Loy

    Lecturer

    BioTrevor Loy is a Lecturer in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University, where he co-teaches a graduate-level course titled "Entrepreneurial Management and Finance." Trevor is also the Managing Partner and Founder of Flywheel Ventures. He has over 20 years of investing, entrepreneurial and operating experience in technology ventures. He is also a past director of the National Venture Capital Association (NVCA), a co-founder of the New Mexico Venture Capital Association, and helped create the Rocky Mountain Venture Capital Association.

    At Flywheel, Trevor has made over two dozen investments, including those that led to the IPO of Jive Software (NASDAQ: JIVE), the acquisition of MicroProbe by FormFactor (NASDAQ: FORM), the acquisition of Tuscany Design Automation by Dassault Systèmes (NYSE Euronext: DSY), the acquisition of Samba Holdings by Cerca Group (privately held), and other confidential liquidity events.

    Prior to Flywheel Ventures, Trevor held entrepreneurial, executive and technical roles at companies including Gigabeat (backed by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, and acquired by Napster); Brooktree (acquired by Rockwell Semiconductor, now Conexant Systems); ParkingNet, Teradyne, and Intel Corporation.

    Trevor holds a BS Electrical Engineering, MS Electrical Engineering, and MS Management Science & Engineering, all from Stanford University.

  • David Luenberger

    David Luenberger

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioDavid G. Luenberger received the B.S. degree from the California Institute of Technology and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University, all in Electrical Engineering. Since 1963 he has been on the faculty of Stanford University. He helped found the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems, now merged to become the Department of Management Science and Engineering, where his is currently a professor.

    He served as Technical Assistant to the President's Science Advisor in 1971-72, was Guest Professor at the Technical University of Denmark (1986), Visiting Professor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1976), and served as Department Chairman at Stanford (1980-1991).

    His awards include: Member of the National Academy of Engineering (2008), the Bode Lecture Prize of the Control Systems Society (1990), the Oldenburger Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1995), and the Expository Writing Award of the Institute of Operations Research and Management Science (1999) He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (since 1975).

    Interests:
    His overall interest is the application of mathematics to issues in control, planning, and decision making. He has worked in the technical fields of control theory, optimization theory and algorithms, and investment theory for portfolios and project evaluation. He has published six major textbooks: Optimization by Vector Space Methods, Linear and Nonlinear Programming (jointly with Yinyu Ye), Introduction to Dynamic Systems, Microeconomic theory, Investment Science, and Information Science. He has published over eighty journal papers.

  • Robert McGinn

    Robert McGinn

    Professor (Teaching) of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsexploration of ethical issues related to nanotechnology

  • Paul Milgrom

    Paul Milgrom

    Shirley R. and Leonard W. Ely, Jr. Professor of Humanities and Sciences, Senior Fellow at SIEPR and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the Graduate School of Business and of Management Science and Engineering

    BioPaul Milgrom is the Shirley and Leonard Ely professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Department of Economics at Stanford University and professor, by courtesy, in the Stanford Graduate School of Business and in the Department of Management Sciences and Engineering. Born in Detroit, Michigan on April 20, 1948, he is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a winner of the 2008 Nemmers Prize in Economics, the 2012 BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge award, the 2017 CME-MSRI prize for Innovative Quantitative Applications, and the 2018 Carty Award for the Advancement of Science.

    Milgrom is known for his work on innovative resource allocation methods, particularly in radio spectrum. He is coinventor of the simultaneous multiple round auction and the combinatorial clock auction. He also led the design team for the FCC's 2017 incentive auction, which reallocated spectrum from television broadcast to mobile broadband.

    According to his BBVA Award citation: “Paul Milgrom has made seminal contributions to an unusually wide range of fields of economics including auctions, market design, contracts and incentives, industrial economics, economics of organizations, finance, and game theory.” As counted by Google Scholar, Milgrom’s books and articles have received more than 80,000 citations.

    Finally, Milgrom has been a successful adviser of graduate students, winning the 2017 H&S Dean's award for Excellence in Graduate Education.

  • Reiko Miura-Ko

    Reiko Miura-Ko

    Lecturer

    BioAnn Miura-Ko is a founding partner at Floodgate, a seed-stage VC firm in Palo Alto, CA. Ann is the founding board member and early investor in companies such as Lyft, TaskRabbit, Ayasdi, Xamarin, and Refinery29.

    Ann is well-known in Silicon Valley as a pioneer investor in the artificial intelligence space. In addition to partnering with entrepreneurs building impactful businesses based on truly intelligent AI, she is a co-sponsor of the AI Grant, a nonprofit research lab that funds work on open source AI. Her deep interest in the space began as a child – her father was a NASA rocket scientist – and her expertise developed as an undergraduate at Yale, where she participated in the Robocup Competition in Paris, France.

    A repeat member of the Forbes Midas List, she is also a lecturer in entrepreneurship at Stanford and a member of All Raise, a nonprofit committed to improving diversity in funders and founders. Prior to Floodgate, Ann worked at Charles River Ventures and McKinsey and Company. She has a BSEE from Yale and a PhD from Stanford in math modeling of computer security. She lives in the Bay Area with her husband and her three rascals (aka kids). Hobbies include eating, playing classical piano and broadway tunes.

  • Pedram Mokrian

    Pedram Mokrian

    Adjunct Professor

    BioPedram Mokrian is Adjunct Professor at Stanford University and a lecturer at the Haas School of business at UC Berkeley where he teaches and advises entrepreneurs and global 1000 companies alike on entrepreneurship, business model disruption, and technology innovation strategy. He was previously a Principal at Mayfield, one of Silicon Valley’s most storied venture capital firms, where he was part of the investment team with over $3.5B assets under management. Mokrian is a founding Partner of the Ratio Academy, New Line Ventures. He also serves as a mentor or advisor to a number of start-ups, innovation incubators, including Global Innovation Catalyst, the Texas Medical Center Innovation Center, Innovation Labs, MISO, and Moog, and serves on the advisory board of Phillips66.

  • Walter Murray

    Walter Murray

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Murray's research interests include numerical optimization, numerical linear algebra, sparse matrix methods, optimization software and applications of optimization. He has authored two books (Practical Optimization and Optimization and Numerical Linear Algebra) and over eighty papers. In addition to his University work he has extensive consulting experience with industry, government, and commerce.