School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 101-140 of 140 Results

  • Elaine Treharne

    Elaine Treharne

    Roberta Bowman Denning Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of German Studies

    BioMy main research interests are in Early British manuscripts--their materiality, contents and contexts of production and reception. I have published widely in this area over the last twenty years, focusing most specifically on religious poetry and prose and manuscripts dating from c. 1020 to c. 1220. I was Principal Investigator of the AHRC-funded research project and ebook, 'The Production and Use of English Manuscripts, 1060 to 1220' (http://www.le.ac.uk/ee/em1060to1220/), which ran from 2005 to 2010, and I've recently written Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020 to 1220 (OUP, 2012). I'm also a textual editor, and among my work is Old and Middle English, c. 890-1450: An Anthology, 3rd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), and The Old English Life of St Nicholas (Leeds, 1997). Recent collections include Textual Distortion (2017), Producing and Using English Manuscripts in the Post-Conquest Period,New Medieval Literatures13 (Special Issue, edited with Orietta Da Rold) (2013), and The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Literaturein English (OUP, 2010), which I co-edited with Greg Walker.

    My current projects focus on the materiality of the book and the long History of Text Technologies from the earliest times (c. 60,000BCE) to the present day. I research the hapticity and phenomenology of the Medieval book, and will be publishing The Sensual Book,500-1200 based on this work. This research also extends to a more modern period of the Medieval, and to the work of artists, including William Morris, Edward Johnston, Eric Gill and David Jones, and I'll be publishing on these figures in Beauty and the Book: Arts and Crafts to Modernism eventually. I am working on Salisbury's Manuscripts for the Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Microfiche Facsimile series, and completing The Very Short Introduction to Medieval Literature (OUP, 2014). My major research networks involve colleagues at the Universities of Cambridge, Glasgow, Oxford, London, and the University of British Columbia, among others. Stanford Text Technologies collaborates widely with an international group of scholars, both on manuscripts from Western culture, but also manuscripts and inscribed objects from East Asian cultures.

    Professionally, I am keen advocate and critic of the use of digital technologies in the classroom and in research; and I am concerned about the ways in which we display manuscripts and employ palaeographical and codicological tools online. With colleagues here and at Cambridge, I am developing online teaching materials for Medieval Manuscript Studies, in a sequence called 'Digging Deeper'. I have been the Ida Beam Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Iowa, an American Philosophical Society Franklin Fellow, a Princeton Procter Fellow, and I'm a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, of the Royal Historical Society, and the English Association (and its former Chair and President). I serve as Editor for the OUP Oxford Bibliographies Online British and Irish Literature initiative, and I am General Editor of the OUP Oxford Textual Perspectives Series, and the Stanford University Press Text Technologies Series.

  • Alexandra Nicole Trelle

    Alexandra Nicole Trelle

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Psychology

    BioI completed my undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto, and my PhD at the University of Cambridge. My work explores the neural mechanisms supporting episodic memory, and how these are affected by aging and Alzheimer's disease. I am currently leading the Stanford Aging and Memory Study, a large-scale longitudinal project examining individual differences in episodic memory in older adults. My research combines structural and functional MRI, PET imaging, and analysis of molecular and genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

  • Jennifer Trimble

    Jennifer Trimble

    Associate Professor of Classics

    BioJennifer Trimble works on the visual and material culture of the Roman Empire, with interests in portraits and replication, the visual culture of Roman slavery, comparative urbanism, and ancient mapping. Her book on Women and Visual Replication in Roman Imperial Art and Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2011) explores the role of visual sameness in constructing public identity and articulating empire and place. Trimble was co-director of the IRC-Oxford-Stanford excavations in the Roman Forum (now being prepared for publication), focused on the interactions of commercial, religious and monumental space. She also co-directed Stanford's Digital Forma Urbis Romae Project, a collaboration between computer scientists and archaeologists to help reassemble a fragmentary ancient map of the city of Rome.

  • Barry Trost

    Barry Trost

    Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioBorn in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Barry Trost began his university training at the University of Pennsylvania (BA, 1962) and completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1965). He moved directly to the University of Wisconsin, where he was promoted to Professor of Chemistry and subsequently Vilas Research Professor. He joined the faculty at Stanford as Professor of Chemistry in 1987 and became Tamaki Professor of Humanities and Sciences in 1990. In addition to serving multiple visiting professorships, Professor Trost was presented with a Docteur honoris causa of the Université Claude-Bernard (Lyon I), France, and in 1997 a Doctor Scientiarum Honoris Causa of the Technion, Haifa, Israel. In recognition of his innovations and scholarship in the field of organic synthesis, Professor Trost has received the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award, and the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award, among many others. Professor Trost has been elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Chemical Society, and American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and served as Chairman of the NIH Medicinal Chemistry Study Section. He has held over 125 special university lectureships and presented over 270 Plenary Lectures at national and international meetings. He has published two books and over 950 scientific articles. He edited a major compendium entitled Comprehensive Organic Synthesis consisting of nine volumes and serves on the editorial board for Science of Synthesis and Reaxys.

    The Trost Group’s research program revolves around the theme of synthesis, including target molecules with potential applications as novel catalysts, as well as antibiotic and antitumor therapies. The work comprises two major activities: 1) developing the tools, i.e., the reactions and reagents, and 2) creating the proper network of reactions to make complex targets readily available from simple starting materials.

    Efforts to develop "chemists' enzymes" – non-peptidic transition metal based catalysts that can perform chemo-, regio-, diastereo-, and especially enantioselective reactions – focus close attention to the question of atom economy to minimize waste, energy, and consumption of raw materials.

    Synthetic efficiency raises the question of metal catalyzed cycloadditions to rings other than six-membered. A general strategy is evolving for a "Diels-Alder" equivalent for formation of five, seven, nine, etc. membered carbo- and heterocyclic rings.

    An exciting new direction derives from the molecular gymnastics acetylenes undergo in the presence of transition metals. Additional specific goals include cycloisomerization to virtually all types of ring sizes and systems with particularly versatile juxtaposition of functionality.

    Palladium and ruthenium catalysts represent a major part of the lab's efforts, in order to invent new synthetic processes together with new opportunities for selectivity complementary to that obtained using other metal complexes. Main group chemistry, especially involving silicon, zinc, and sulfur, also offers many opportunities for new reaction design. Rational design of novel catalysts for asymmetric additions to carbonyl and imine groups are an exciting thrust.From these new synthetic tools evolve new synthetic strategies towards complex natural products. Targets include β-lactam antibiotics, ionophores, steroids and related compounds (e.g., Vitamin D metabolites), alkaloids, nucleosides, carbohydrates, and macrolide, terpenoid, and tetracyclic antitumor and antibiotic agents.

  • Nancy de Wit

    Nancy de Wit

    Victoria and Roger Sant Professor in Art

    BioNancy J. Troy is Victoria and Roger Sant Professor in Art and Chair of the Art & Art History Department at Stanford University. In addition to The De Stijl Environment (MIT Press, 1983), she is the author of Modernism and the Decorative Arts in France: Art Nouveau to Le Corbusier (Yale University Press, 1991), Couture Culture: A Study in Modern Art and Fashion(MIT Press, 2003), and, most recently, The Afterlife of Piet Mondrian(University of Chicago Press, 2013). In this book about Mondrian after his death in 1944, Troy examines the trajectories of the artist's work and legacy as they circulated through the realms of elite and popular culture, and she explores the ways in which the dominant historical narrative of Mondrian and his work has been shaped by art-market forces.

    Professor Troy received her PhD from Yale University in 1979, and thereafter taught at The Johns Hopkins University (1979-83), Northwestern University (1983-93), and the University of Southern California (1994-2010). A past president of the National Committee for the History of Art, she was Editor-in-Chief of the flagship art history journal, The Art Bulletin, from 1994 to 1997. She has been awarded many fellowships, most notably from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Getty Research Institute, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts.

    At Stanford, Professor Troy teaches courses on modern European and American art, architecture and design; cubism; modern art and fashion; art, business and the law; the art market, and topics generated by the collections and exhibitions of the Cantor Arts Center and the Art and Architecture Library.

  • Jeanne Tsai

    Jeanne Tsai

    Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines how culture shapes affective processes (emotions, moods, feelings) and the implications cultural differences in these processes have for what decisions people make, how people think about health and illness, and how people perceive and respond to others in an increasingly multicultural world.

  • Albert Tsao

    Albert Tsao

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biology

    BioHoward Hughes Medical Institute Fellow of The Helen Hay Whitney Foundation

  • Edison Tse

    Edison Tse

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Tse received his BS, MS, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the Director of Asia Center of Management Science and Engineering, which has the charter of developing executive training programs for executives in Asian enterprises, conducting research on development of the emerging economy in Asia and establishing research affiliations with Asian enterprises, with a special focus in Greater China: China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.
    In 1973, he received the prestigious Donald Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in recognition of his outstanding contribution in the field of Automatic Control. He had served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions of Automatic Control, and a co-editor of the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, which he co-founded. In recent years he dedicated his research effort in dynamic entrepreneurial strategy and transformation of Chinese production economy to innovation economy. He developed a significant theory on innovation synergistic to Chinese culture and its application to China industry transformation. Over the years he has made valuable contributions in the field of engineering, economics, and business creation and expansion. He has published over 180 papers on his research activities. Since March 2003, he has been teaching his new found theory on China innovation and Industry Transformation to high level Chinese government officials and Chinese executives.
    Since 2007, he co-directed a Stanford Financial Engineering Certificate Program in Hong Kong that upgrades the quality of managers and traders in the financial institutions in Hong Kong. Since 2009, he co-directed a Stanford program on Regional Industry Transformation and Public Administration that was attended by city officials from various cities in China, and directs a Stanford program on Chinese Industry Transformation and Innovation that was attended by executives from Chinese enterprises. Prof. Tse is the author of over 150 articles in the fields of systems and control. He received the 1973 Donald P. Eckman Award for outstanding achievement in the field of automatic control. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he worked at Systems Control, Inc., where he formulated and solved numerous problems in defense, electric power, forecasting and marketing.
    At Stanford, he has developed computer integrated systems to support fishery management policy decisions, management and control of the manufacturing enterprise, and industrial competitive analysis and product development. He is currently conducting research on building core competence within an enterprise to gain competitive advantage. He established the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control and is now a member of its Advisory Board. His national society memberships include the Econometric Society, IEEE, ORSA, and TIMS. Tse developed a framework for analyzing dynamic competitive strategy based on a dynamic model of grabber-holder dynamics that describes the forces that would shape the formation of an ecosystem supporting an exciting vision. Within such a framework, he developed dynamic strategies for firms entering an emerging market, latecomers that want to wedge into a matured market, and firms that need to turn danger into opportunities. Tse’s recent interests are in extending the theory to analyzing the dynamic competition in network economy, regional technology center development, and applying the theory of dynamic strategies to the wireless, airport, real estate, and financial industries in China.

  • Chrysoula Tsogka

    Chrysoula Tsogka

    Visiting Professor, Mathematics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research concerns the development and analysis
    of correlation based methodologies for detecting and imaging changes in
    complex media. The underlying physical phenomena is wave propagation, and
    depending on the considered application, the medium change could be permanent
    or temporary. In structural health monitoring for example, the change is a defect
    that has formed, and which we wish to detect and image, whereas in geophysics the goal
    is to monitor changes in the earth's interior. Other concerned applications are satellite imaging through the turbulent atmosphere and underwater acoustic imaging.

  • Shripad Tuljapurkar

    Shripad Tuljapurkar

    The Dean and Virginia Morrison Professor of Population Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStochastic dynamics of human and natural populations; prehistoric societies; probability forecasts including sex ratios, mortality, aging and fiscal balance; life history evolution.

  • Frederick Turner

    Frederick Turner

    Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and Professor, by courtesy, of Art and Art History and of History

    BioFred Turner’s research and teaching focus on media technology and cultural change. He is especially interested in the ways that emerging media have helped shape American life since World War II.

    Turner is the author of three books: The Democratic Surround: Multimedia and American Liberalism from World War II to the Psychedelic Sixties; From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network and the Rise of Digital Utopianism; and Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory. His essays have tackled topics ranging from the rise of reality crime television to the role of the Burning Man festival in contemporary new media industries. They are available here: fredturner.stanford.edu/essays/.

    Turner’s research has received a number of academic awards and has been featured in publications ranging from Science and the New York Times to Ten Zen Monkeys. It has also been translated into French, Spanish, German, Polish and Chinese.

    Turner is also the Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Turner taught Communication at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also worked as a freelance journalist for ten years, writing for the Boston Sunday Globe Magazine, the Boston Phoenix, and the Pacific News Service.

    Turner earned his Ph.D. in Communication from the University of California, San Diego. He has also earned a B.A. in English and American Literature from Brown University and an M.A. in English from Columbia University.

  • Barbara Tversky

    Barbara Tversky

    Professor of Psychology, Emerita

    BioBarbara Tversky studied cognitive psychology at the University of Michigan. She held positions first at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and then at Stanford, from 1978-2005 when she took early retirement. She is an active Emerita Professor of Psychology at Stanford and Professor of Psychology at Columbia Teachers College. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the Cognitive Science Society, the Society for Experimental Psychology, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the American Academy of Arts and Science. She has been on the Governing Boards of the Psychonomic Society, the Cognitive Science Society, the International Union of Psychological Science, and the Association for Psychological Science. She has served on the editorial boards of many journals and the organizing committees of dozens of international interdisciplinary meetings.

    Her research has spanned memory, categorization, language, spatial cognition, event perception and cognition, diagrammatic reasoning, sketching, creativity, design, and gesture. The overall goals have been to uncover how people think about the spaces they inhabit and the actions they perform and see and then how people use the world, including their own actions and creations, to remember, to think, to create, to communicate. A forthcoming book, Mind in Motion: How Action Shapes Thought, will overview that work. She has collaborated widely, with linguists, philosophers, neuroscientists, computer scientists, chemists, biologists, architects, designers, and artists.