School of Medicine


Showing 101-200 of 336 Results

  • Corinne Beinat

    Corinne Beinat

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe focus of my research is to develop novel imaging and treatment strategies to detect and better manage cancer. This approach relies first on the identification and validation of molecular targets and biomarkers that are linked with underlying the underlying biology driving the initiation and progression of cancers. We then develop novel small molecule based radiotracers to monitor fundamental molecular and cellular processes occurring in living subjects using positron emission tomography (PET) with the goal of improving cancer diagnosis and management. We additionally develop novel peptide based theragnostic agents for stratification of patients with high receptor expression, treatment with targeted radionuclide therapy, and subsequent monitoring of treatment response. Our overall goal is to develop multiple clinically translatable strategies to improve cancer diagnosis, management, and outcomes.

  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Automating monogenic patient diagnosis.
    2. The genomic signatures of independent divergent and convergent trait evolution in mammals.
    3. The logic of human gene regulation.
    4. The reasons for sequence ultraconservation.
    5. Cryptogenomics to bridge medical silos.
    6. Cryptogenetics to debate social injustice.
    7. Managing patient risk using machine learning.
    8. Understanding the flow of money in the US healthcare system.

  • Michael Eddy F Belloy

    Michael Eddy F Belloy

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioMy broad scientific goal is to investigate neurological disorders with the aim of identifying novel mechanisms that improve understanding of disease pathophysiology and that could lead to novel drug development. I pursue this goal by investigating the genetic risk factors of the respective disease under question, studying how they contribute to disruptions of brain function measured by in vivo imaging techniques, and how they correlate with the presentation of disease-sensitive biomarkers. Within this broader scope, my primary interest is to focus specifically on Alzheimer's disease, elucidating the genetic, molecular, and clinical spectrum of the disease, and hopefully, eventually, contributing to the path towards a cure.

    I am a highly interdisciplinary scientist with experience in programming (using various scripting languages), advanced data analyses methods, neuroimaging, and studies of preclinical mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. I also have a long-standing interest in brain function and network dynamics in both health and disease. During my postdoc at Stanford, I have further gained experience into the clinical aspects, imaging approaches, and genetics of Alzheimer’s disease. Altogether, this translates into my current research strategy in which I investigate large-scale multimodal datasets that contain information on genetics, multi-omics, clinical outcome measures, structural and functional brain properties, and other biomarker data.

    I am currently an Instructor at Stanford university, in the lab of Dr. Michael D Greicius. My main aims in this lab are to identify genetic factors that may be causative to Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, I aim to uncover genetic risk factors that interact with the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene to alter risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Further, I seek to identify how genetic interactions differ by sex, age, and genetic ancestry. I believe this will allow the identification of novel genes relevant to Alzheimer's disease and contribute to advancing personalized genetic medicine.

    During my PhD, supervised by Dr. Marleen Verhoye, Dr. Shella Keilholz and Dr. Georgios A Keliris, I worked on developing dynamic resting state functional (rsf)MRI in mice, which lead to the first observation of mouse Quasi-Periodic patterns, and related applications for Alzheimer's disease research in rodents. I still have an ongoing interest in dynamic rsfMRI research.

  • Sean Bendall

    Sean Bendall

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to understand the mechanisms regulating the development of human systems. Drawing on both pluripotent stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and immunology, combined with novel high-content single-cell analysis (CyTOF – Mass Cytometry) and imagining (MIBI-Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging) we are creating templates of ‘normal’ human cellular behavior to both discover novel regulatory events and cell populations as well as understand dysfunctional processes such as cancer.

  • Eran Bendavid

    Eran Bendavid

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEffect of global health policies on health of individuals in developing countries, global health, HIV and TB.

  • Edward Bender

    Edward Bender

    Clinical Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Edward Bender specializes in the treatment of adult cardiac abnormalities, including ischemic heart disease, structural and valvular disease, and arrhythmias. Additionally, he has an interest and expertise in General Thoracic and Vascular surgery. Dr. Bender currently works with organizations within the medical community to develop software to aid in the teaching and practice of medicine.

  • Catherine Benedict

    Catherine Benedict

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Medical Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on improving cancer survivorship through better understanding of long-term health outcomes and through the development of theoretically driven, evidence-based behavioral interventions to improve adjustment, risk management, and quality of life. To this end, I lead studies aimed to guide and support patient decision-making and self-management after cancer. Much of my work focuses on the experiences of young adults affected by cancer.

  • Anne L Benham

    Anne L Benham

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    BioI specialize in the assessment and treatment of young children and their families from ages 1-7 years. I focus on understanding of their problems and symptoms from a developmentally informed, family centered , biological and experiential lens that takes into account the child's emotional, behavioral , sociocultural, biological and relationship history. I use attachment theory to understand the psychosocial aspects of the child and his/her history. I provide therapy to children individually and in family dyads or groups as appropriate and always include work with the parents as my collaborators and clients. I have had this focus to my clinical work and teaching of clinicians in training for my career over the past 40 years. I am interested in integrating multiple perspectives to understand and treat families.I use my medical training to work with children who are experiencing medical disorders , trauma, and conditions in the child or in other family members as it impacts the child's sense of self, safety, anxiety and body. I use play to connect with children and to help them communicate their fears, wishes and experiences to augment verbal communication and to process frightening experiences.

  • Ori-Michael Johanan Benhamou

    Ori-Michael Johanan Benhamou

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Benhamou received his Bachelor's degree at Duke University and went on to complete medical school at Ben-Gurion University. He completed his residency in Psychiatry at Westchester Medical Center and fellowship in Addiction Medicine at Stanford. He has published works in the areas of suicide, autoimmune encephalitis and addiction. His current interests include substance abuse, the role of transcranial magnetic stimulation on addiction and the intersection of suicide and substance abuse.

  • William Benitz

    William Benitz

    Philip Sunshine, M.D., Professor in Neonatology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology, patent ductus arteriosus, pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, infant ventilation, neonatal clinical protocols/clinical pathways.

  • Jade Benjamin-Chung

    Jade Benjamin-Chung

    Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioJade Benjamin-Chung, PhD MPH, is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health. Her research applies causal inference and machine learning techniques to study interventions to control, eliminate, or eradicate environmentally-transmitted infectious diseases, including interventions to prevent malaria, diarrhea, soil-transmitted helminths, and influenza. She is a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Investigator and a recipient of a K01 Career Development Award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to estimate spillover effects of malaria eradication interventions in southern Africa (K01AI141616). She completed her graduate training in epidemiology and biostatistics at UC Berkeley and joined Stanford in May 2021.

  • Christopher Bennett

    Christopher Bennett

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

    BioChristopher Bennett, MD, MSc, MA, FAAEM, is a physician scientist in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University. He completed residency training at Harvard Medical School's program in Emergency Medicine based at Massachusetts General Hospital. Bennett holds an undergraduate degree from Winthrop University (B.S. in Biology), a graduate degree from Duke University (M.A. in Genetics and Genomics), a medical degree (M.D.) from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Medicine, and a graduate degree from Stanford University (M.Sc. in Epidemiology). In addition to his formal graduate training, Bennett was previously a scientist with the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow at Johns Hopkins’s McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, and a researcher with the Emergency Medicine Network based at Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Christopher previously served on the 2018-2019 Board of Directors for the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM); after his term on the Board, he was a member of the SAEM executive taskforce on Equity and Inclusion. He was subsequently a founding member of the SAEM Equity and Inclusion Committee, a position he continues to hold. He also served on the Massachusetts Medical Society's 2019-2020 Committee on Publications which directs the publication and distribution of the New England Journal of Medicine. His research has appeared in journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, and JAMA Surgery. His writing has appeared in The American Journal of Bioethics, STAT News, KevinMD.com, and Forbes.

  • Rachel Bensen

    Rachel Bensen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on improving health care delivery systems for children, adolescents and young adults with chronic illness and their families. I have particular interests in the development of chronic disease self-management skills, assessment of patient reported outcomes, the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care, and comprehensive programs to support families caring for a child with chronic illness.

  • Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMSc

    Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMSc

    Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor
    On Partial Leave from 03/01/2022 To 08/31/2022

    BioLaurie Kraus Lacob Professor
    Stanford University School of Medicine

    Director, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center
    Senior Advisor, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Executive Director, Stanford Health Communication Initiative
    Director, MedArts Films
    Stanford Center for Health Education
    Stanford University

  • Marc Berg

    Marc Berg

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    BioDr. Berg was born and raised in rural Minnesota and has been in academic medicine since 1997. His research interests include CPR performance, pediatric defibrillation science, and education primarily through simulation. He has been a volunteer with the American Heart Association for more than 10 years, leading the Pediatric CPR course (PALS) in 2010. He has served in several administrative positions including Division Chief of Pediatric Critical Care at the University of Arizona, Board Director of the University of Arizona Health Network and Governor-appointed member of the Arizona Medical Board. In his free time he enjoys biking, reading and spending time with his family. He is married with three children and lives in Menlo Park, California.

    See his LinkedIn profile here:

    https://www.linkedin.com/in/marc-berg-6399934/

  • Ardin S. Berger

    Ardin S. Berger

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Berger is a pediatric pain physician who is ABA boarded in pain medicine, anesthesiology, and pediatric anesthesiology.

  • David Bergman

    David Bergman

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research has involved the use of new technologies to create different types of patient-doctor transactions. I am also interested in how these new transactions impact clinical care processes. Current work includes the evaluation of a patient portal for children with cystic fibrosis, the use of telemedicine to bring asthma experts into the schools and the attitudes of teens and parents about the use of a secure patient portal for teens.

  • Dominique Bergmann

    Dominique Bergmann

    Shirley R. and Leonard W. Ely, Jr. Professor of the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetic, genomic and cell biological approaches to study cell fate acquisition, focusing on cases where cell fate is correlated with asymmetric cell division.

  • Michele Berk

    Michele Berk

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe focus of my research is on adolescent suicidal and self-harm behavior. I am currently one of four Principal Investigators of a multisite NIMH-sponsored RCT of DBT for adolescents at high risk for suicide (NCT01528020: Collaborative Adolescent Research on Emotions and Suicide [CARES], PI: Linehan, McCauley, Berk, & Asarnow) aimed at evaluating the efficacy of DBT with adolescents compared to a combined individual and group supportive therapy control condition (IGST).

  • Rebecca Bernert

    Rebecca Bernert

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioI am an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and a licensed clinical psychologist in the Stanford University School of Medicine. I am a suicidologist, with subspecialty expertise in clinical trials, epidemiology, and suicide prevention best practices. I have joint specialty in behavioral sleep medicine and treatment development. I am founding Director of The Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory, and Co-Chair an initiative to establish a Stanford Center for Suicide Prevention. Our research program utilizes cognitive, biological (e.g., fMRI), and behavioral testing paradigms, with an emphasis on translational therapeutics across the lifespan. Our mission is to identify novel therapeutic targets for suicide prevention, including seminal work in establishing the subfield of sleep and suicide prevention. A special focus of our work is the development of rapid-action, low-risk interventions for the prevention of suicide. Our mission is to evaluate transdiagnostic risk factors and biomarkers underlying treatment response that may inform etiology, reduce stigma, and advance innovation. Advocating for its utility as a visible, yet non-stigmatizing warning sign of suicide—our earliest work delineated sleep as an evidence-based risk factor for suicidal behaviors. Funded by NIH and DOD, we subsequently conducted the first suicide prevention clinical trials, testing efficacy of a rapid-action (6 h) insomnia treatment for suicidal behaviors. These use a mechanisms focus to identify central disease processes (eg, underlying neural circuitry, behavioral factors) in the pathogenesis of risk for anti-suicidal response. An overarching aim is to harness new technologies to aid risk prediction, precision medicine, and intervention opportunity. We are also committed to improving national training practices and high risk monitoring of suicidal behaviors (e.g., national needs-assessment of medical training parameters; use of AI for suicide prevention; study of sleep as an ER target to enhance acute intervention).

    Regarding translation to policy, I have served as a content expert for nationally-directed health initiatives with NIH, VA, DOD, DARPA, SAMHSA, CDC, and The White House. I recently led development of the CA 2020 Statewide Strategy for Suicide Prevention, following invited testimony (CA State Assembly) and a commissioned Policy Brief on suicide prevention best practices. Additional advisory and advocacy work centers on how research guides public health policy and implementation. I am especially committed to initiatives that promise impact to suicide prevention on a broad scale, including universal strategies for lethal means restriction and real-time surveillance of suicidal behaviors. To this end, I have been honored to serve as a content expert to The White House Office of Science and Technology for initiatives focused on technology innovation and led advisory work promoting suicide deterrent systems for private organizations and public sites, such as the Golden Gate Bridge. I have consulted for technology companies, as well as private industry and healthcare partners. Last, inspired by maternity leaves coinciding with the above work, I have a separate research line examining organizational development, inclusive practices, and employee wellness. This addresses disparate impact of institutional and federal medical leave practices on recruitment and retention of women. Our program focuses on cost-effective policy for diversity training and reduced attrition of women in medicine, law, STEM and technology fields. As such, I am dedicated to spearheading development of a center for policy and inclusive practices, diversity, and equity education.

    To donate to our work or partner with us, please contact Stanford Medical Center Development at medicalgiving@stanford.edu to connect with us directly or to learn more about supporting our programs.

  • Daniel Bernstein

    Daniel Bernstein

    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel G. Salter Endowed Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to understand hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure associated with congenital heart disease.
    2. Role of alterations in mitochondrial dycamics and function in normal physiology and disease.
    3. Differences between R and L ventricular responses to stress,
    4. Immune biomarkers of risk after pediatric VAD implantation.
    5. Biomarkers for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Jon Bernstein

    Jon Bernstein

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on the diagnosis, discovery and delineation of rare genetic conditions with a focus of neurodevelopmental disorders. This work includes the application of novel computational methods and multi-omics profiling (whole genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, metabolomics). I additionally participate in an interdisciplinary project to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of genetic neurodevelopmental disorders..

  • William Berquist

    William Berquist

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)
    On Partial Leave from 08/01/2022 To 08/31/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastroenterology, gastointestinal motility, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  • Gerald Berry

    Gerald Berry

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiopulmonary and pulmonary transplant medicine; diagnostic surgical pathology

  • Mark Francis Berry, MD

    Mark Francis Berry, MD

    Mylavarapu Rogers Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Berry joined the Division of Thoracic Surgery at Stanford in August 2014. He came to Stanford from Duke University, where he had most recently served as Associate Professor. He received his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine after receiving bachelors and masters degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Duke University Medical Center after performing a residency in General Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. His Cardiothoracic Surgical training included a year dedicated to Minimally Invasive General Thoracic Surgery, a period that also included an American Association for Thoracic Surgery sponsored Traveling Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Dr. Berry practices all aspects of thoracic surgery, including procedures for benign and malignant conditions of the lung, esophagus, and mediastinum. He has a particular interest in minimally invasive techniques, and has extensive experience in treating thoracic surgical conditions using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS), laparoscopic, robotic, endoscopic, and bronchoscopic approaches. He serves as the co-Director of the Stanford Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Center (SMITS), and has both directed and taught in several minimally invasive thoracic surgery courses.

    Dr. Berry also has a Masters of Health Sciences in Clinical Research from Duke University. His clinical research activities mirror his clinical interests and activities in optimizing short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with thoracic surgical conditions. He has more than sixty peer-reviewed publications, most of which are related to both the use of minimally invasive thoracic surgical techniques as well as evaluating outcomes after treatment of thoracic malignancies. His clinical practice and his research both focus on choosing the most appropriate treatment and approach for patients based on the individual characteristics of the patient and their disease process.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmolecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Alice Bertaina MD, PhD

    Alice Bertaina MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bertaina is a highly experienced clinician and will play a key role in supporting Section Chief Dr. Rajni Agarwal and Clinical Staff in the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. She will also continue her research on immune recovery and miRNA, understanding the mechanisms underlying immune reconstitution, Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT in pediatric patients affected by hematological malignant and non-malignant disorders.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Radiology

    BioProfessor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). She is now the Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H.

    Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, and the Chemistry of the Future Solvay Prize, among others.

    The Bertozzi Group develops chemical tools to study the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammation, tuberculosis and most recently COVID-19. She is the inventor of "bioorthogonal chemistry", a class of chemical reactions compatible with living systems that enable molecular imaging and drug targeting. Her group also developed new therapeutic modalities for targeted degradation of extracellular biomolecules, such as antibody-enzyme conjugates and Lysosome Targeting Chimeras (LYTACs). As well, her group studies NGly1 deficiency, a rare genetic disease characterized by loss of the human N-glycanase.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi cofounded Redwood Bioscience, Enable Biosciences, Palleon Pharmaceuticals, InterVenn Bio, OliLux Bio, Grace Science LLC and Lycia Therapeutics. She is also a member of the Board of Directors of Lilly.

  • Jill Beyer, OD

    Jill Beyer, OD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology

    BioJill Beyer, OD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Beyer graduated from Southern California College of Optometry, earning her Doctor of Optometry degree with distinction. She completed her residency at New England College of Optometry in Boston, Massachusetts, and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Oregon State University.

    Jill’s residency education included time spent at the Boston Foundation for Sight, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Cornea Consultants & Boston Laser Center, and Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates.

    After residency training, Jill continued on as a clinical preceptor at the New England College of Optometry while working in private practice in Boston. She then transitioned to full time academic work at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary becoming the Director of the Contact Lens Department and an Instructor in Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School.

  • Joydeep Bhadury

    Joydeep Bhadury

    Instructor, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy long-term goal is to generate whole human organs in large research animals, which will be universally immune compatible and ready for human transplantation.

  • Vivek Bhalla, MD

    Vivek Bhalla, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bhalla's two primary research interests are in the role of the kidney in diabetes and hypertension. We use molecular, biochemical, and transgenic approaches to study: (1) mechanisms diabetic kidney disease disease including the role of the endothelium to regulate inflammation and kidney injury; and (2) regulation of tubular transport of glucose, sodium, and potassium. These latter studies have treatment implications in diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension.

  • Rashmi Parekh Bhandari

    Rashmi Parekh Bhandari

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interventions, treatments, and outcomes in pediatric pain management

  • Sushma Bharadwaj, MD

    Sushma Bharadwaj, MD

    Instructor, Medicine - Blood & Marrow Transplantation

    BioDr. Bharadwaj is fellowship-trained in blood and marrow transplantation, cellular therapy, hematology, and oncology. She is an instructor in the Stanford School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

    Dr. Bharadwaj focuses her expertise on diagnosing and treating cancer in blood and bone marrow. For each patient, she develops a personalized, comprehensive, and compassionate care plan. In her diverse experience as a physician and scientist, she has served as an internal medicine doctor, hospitalist, hematologist, oncologist, and blood and marrow transplantation specialist. Dr. Bharadwaj has a degree in clinical research and is currently conducting clinical trials in transplant and cellular therapy.

    She has participated in research studies of advances in therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, melanoma, and breast cancer. She has co-authored articles published in Leukemia and Lymphoma and elsewhere. Topics include advances in cell transplantation. She also co-wrote the chapter on genome-driven personalized cancer therapy in the book Precision Medicine in Oncology.

    Dr. Bharadwaj has made presentations at meetings of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and other associations.
    Subjects include racial, demographic, and socioeconomic disparities in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Dr. Bharadwaj is a member of the American Society for Transplantation and Cellular Therapy, American Society of Hematology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  • Ankur Bharija

    Ankur Bharija

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPersonal and Professional (Clinical, research, and teaching) interests include promoting health and wellbeing for the frail elders and the seriously ill -- through innovation in High-value healthcare delivery systems, Public health-education, Health Information-technology and Social entrepreneurship.

  • Mahendra T. Bhati

    Mahendra T. Bhati

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Bhati is an interventional psychiatrist with expertise in psychiatric diagnosis, psychopharmacology, and neuromodulation. He completed postdoctoral research studying language abnormalities and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) evoked potentials in schizophrenia. He was a principal investigator for the DSM-5 academic field trials, and his research experiences included roles as an investigator in the first controlled clinical trials of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and low-field synchronized TMS for treatment of depression. His current interests include studying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and augmented reality to target TMS, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for treatment-resistant depression, responsive neurostimulation (RNS) for treatment of impulse and fear-related disorders, and focused ultrasound (FUS) for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder and depression.

  • Richa Bhatia, MD

    Richa Bhatia, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr Richa Bhatia is an adult and pediatric psychiatrist and clinical associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She works in the anxiety disorders clinic and utilizes a biopsychosocial approach, integrating medication management with psychotherapy. Her psychotherapy approach is informed by psychodynamic therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based interventions, and dialectical behavior therapy. Her other clinical interests include depressive disorders, women's mental health, cultural psychiatry, effects of media and technology use in children and adolescents. She has also written about and given talks on ruling out medical conditions mimicking psychiatric disorders.

    She is an avid advocate of improving mental health awareness and reducing stigma about psychiatric conditions and treatments. Her professional opinions have been quoted in CNBC, The Guardian, US News and World Report, The Wall Street Journal, and other media. She enjoys editorial work and serves as an Associate Editor for Current Psychiatry and as a Section Editor for Current Opinion in Psychiatry. In addition, she serves as the Secretary of the Association of Women Psychiatrists.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Professor of Medicine, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the constraints that vulnerable populations face in making decisions that affect their health status, as well as the effects of government policies and programs designed to benefit vulnerable populations.

  • Nidhi Bhutani

    Nidhi Bhutani

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of our research is to understand the fundamental mechanisms that govern and reprogram cellular fate during development, regeneration and disease.

  • Vinod (Vinny) K. Bhutani

    Vinod (Vinny) K. Bhutani

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology; newborn jaundice, bilirubin biology and kernicterus prevention; pulmonary physiology, pulmonary functions and neonatal ventilation. To promote newborn screening for G6PD deficiency in USA.

  • Y. Katherine Bianco

    Y. Katherine Bianco

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Maternal Fetal Medicine

    BioMy clinical interest in pregnancies complicated with birth defects has led my underlying research interests in genomic abnormalities in the human trophoblast carrying to faulty placentation. The latter began with initial work during K12 and KO8 funding. I took a great interest in the human placenta as it carries potential advantages over other tissues sources: first, this highly metabolically active organ is the potential source of many transcripts. Second, the placenta forms at a very early stage of embryonic development, potentially allowing detection of primary alterations as compared to secondary changes that may mask the underlying causal phenomena. Finally, studying early placentation may provide targets for development of novel molecular approaches, such as up-regulate or down-regulate genes, the protein products of which could potentially serve as molecular surrogates for diagnosis and treatment of pregnancy complication such as miscarriages, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy induced hypertension and intrauterine growth retardation. This work has led to the first Trisomy 21, Trisomy 18, trisomy 13 cell lines established from human placentas making it possible to apply gene editing in the early stages of human trophoblast development.

    As my primary clinical responsibility involves treating patients needing medical care and support through their high risk pregnancies, I am interested in factors that may impact outcomes, such as prenatal screening and diagnosis, maternal heart conditions, labor and delivery management, and safety approaches for the second stage of labor. In investigating length of labor and approaches to shorten the second stage, I have found methods of improving perinatal outcomes in diverse maternal populations.

    With regards to my interest in fetal medicine, I have worked in collaboration with other specialists such as radiologists and pediatric cardiologists utilizing imagining studies to assess and determine successful perinatal care and fetal survival.

  • David Bingham

    David Bingham

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    BioDavid Bingham MD is a clinical assistant pathologist specializing in gastrointestinal pathology. He is from Connecticut, graduated from Yale with a BA, and went to Columbia P&S for medical school. He did a residency in Pathology at Stanford University, graduated in 1992 and has been here ever since as a faculty member.

  • Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Michael S Binkley, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Binkley is a radiation oncologist specializing in lymphoma treatment and an assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology.

    His clinical expertise includes stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), total lymphoid and total body irradiation, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).

    For each patient, Dr. Binkley develops a personalized, comprehensive, and compassionate care plan. His goals are to improve both health and quality of life.

    Dr. Binkley has conducted extensive research to advance cancer treatment. In his post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford, he studied the use of genomic signatures to predict response to radiotherapy. His current clinical and laboratory research seek to identify prognostic and predictive clinical, radiographic, and genomic factors to inform individualized treatment strategies.

    He has co-authored articles on his research discoveries published in Cancer Discovery, Blood, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, and elsewhere. Topics have included innovations in the treatment of lymphoma and lung cancer.

    He also has made invited presentations to colleagues at national and international conferences. He has presented the latest findings on radiation therapy for lung cancer and lymphoma at meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma (ICML).

    Honors for Dr. Binkley include the Malcolm A. Bagshaw Award for leadership and outstanding scientific achievement. This award is named for a pioneer in radiation therapy and former chair of the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Binkley is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and American Association for Cancer Research. He is a founding member of the Global nLPHL One Working (GLOW) Working Group, an international collaboration studying nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) in children and adults.

  • Julius Bishop, MD

    Julius Bishop, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bishop specializes in treating fractures of the upper extremity, lower extremity, pelvis and acetabulum as well as the management of post-traumatic problems including malunion, nonunion and infection.

    He received his undergraduate and medical school degrees from Harvard University and went on to complete the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program. He pursued his subspecialty training in Orthopaedic Traumatology at the world-renowned Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington.

    His research interests include applying decision analysis models to orthopaedic trauma problems, studying clinical outcomes after musculoskeletal injury, orthopaedic biomechanics, the basic science of fracture healing, and evaluating new strategies and techniques in fracture surgery.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Brian Blackburn

    Brian Blackburn

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include parasitology and global health; I've investigated cryptosporidium and angiostrongylus outbreaks; schistosoma/strongyloides seroprevalence in refugees, and the distribution and impact of ITNs for malaria and filariasis prevention in Nigeria and India. I have done clinical and programmatic work at teaching hospitals in Liberia and Bangladesh and have opportunities for research in Bangladesh and Kenya, in collaboration with ICDDR,B and CDC, Kenya

  • Britney Blair, PsyD, DBSM, CST

    Britney Blair, PsyD, DBSM, CST

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Sleep Medicine

    BioDr. Blair is a licensed clinical psychologist and is board certified in behavioral sleep medicine. Her clinical and research expertise are in behavioral medicine with specializations in sleep and sexual health. She has made numerous presentations, developed workshops, written chapters and published articles in the area of sleep and sexual medicine. Dr. Blair is a Stanford sleep consultant and is on the adjunct faculty at The Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine. She is also the Clinical Director of The Clinic.

    Dr. Blair completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University Medical School and her pre-doctoral internship at the VA Greater Los Angeles Health Care System. Dr. Blair received her doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium. She received a bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Berkeley. Prior to beginning her doctoral studies, Dr. Blair founded a successful business consulting firm.

  • Richard Bland

    Richard Bland

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of acute and chronic neonatal lung injury and the mechanisms that regulate lung fluid balance and alveolar & pulmonary vascular development after premature birth.

  • Francis Blankenberg

    Francis Blankenberg

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudies on apoptotic cell death in vivo using the H MRS phenomenon.

  • Rebecca Blankenburg, MD, MPH

    Rebecca Blankenburg, MD, MPH

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy educational research interests focus on building a more diverse, inclusive and equitable learning environment and helping develop a sense of belonging, professional identity formation, and competence through longitudinal coaching and scholarly mentorship.

  • Terrence Blaschke

    Terrence Blaschke

    Professor of Medicine and of Molecular Pharmacology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical pharmacology of antiretroviral drugs

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms of variability in drug response.

    Drug development

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor, Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Douglas W. Blayney

    Douglas W. Blayney

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving the quality of cancer care at Stanford, in our network of care, and nationally

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Catherine Blish

    Catherine Blish

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor in Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major goal of our research is to gain insight into the prevention and control of HIV and other viral pathogens by studying the interplay between the virus and the host immune response. We investigate the role of various arms of the immune response, but with a particular focus on NK cells. We hope to gain additional insights into control of infectious diseases by studying how pregnancy modulates immune responses.

  • Daniel Bloch

    Daniel Bloch

    Professor (Research) of Biomedical Data Science (BDS), Emeritus

    BioI received my PhD. in Mathematical Statistics in 1967. I joined the research community at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Immunology & Rheumatology, in 1984 as head statistician directing the biostatistics consulting and analytic support of the Arthritis Rheumatism Aging Medical Information System (ARAMIS) and Multipurpose Arthritis Center (MAC) grant-related research programs. In 1993 I was appointed Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of Medicine and of Health Research & Policy, and am currently Professor of Biostatistics at Stanford University, emeritus since 2007. My contributions to the statistics literature span numerous fields, including methods of sample size estimation, efficiency and bias of estimators, research methods for kappa statistics, non-parametric classification methods and methods of assessing multi-parameter endpoints. I have over 200 peer-reviewed publications. I have been directly involved with the development of numerous criteria rules for classification of diseases and with establishing guidelines for clinical trial research and in proposing responder criteria for osteoarthritis drugs. Since 1987, I have been a consultant on an ad hoc basis to pharmaceutical and biotechnical firms, including both start-up and established companies. I have extensive experience with devices, drugs and biologics and have participated in all aspects of applying statistics to implement investigational plans; e.g.: for protocol development, design of trials, database design. I’ve been a member of the FDA Statistical Advisors Panel, the statistical member on numerous data safety monitoring boards, and frequently represent companies at meetings with the FDA

  • Andra Leah Blomkalns

    Andra Leah Blomkalns

    Redlich Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Andra Blomkalns is an innovation advocate who believes the best patient-centered programs depend upon clinical practice innovation, continuous data-driven improvement, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Dr. Blomkalns has a long-standing history of scholarship and publication on cardiovascular emergencies, point-of-care testing, innate immunity, and obesity. She has authored or contributed to more than 14 chapters and more than 40 journal articles in peer-reviewed publications on topics influential to administration and organization, clinical best practices, and scientific exploration. Additionally, her grant portfolio diversity reflects her multi-pronged, collaborative approach, and includes institutional, investigator-initiated industry, and federal funding.