School of Medicine


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  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab’s mission is to develop therapies for regenerating human tissues lost due to diseases or aging, and to build tissue engineered 3D models for understanding disease progression and informing drug discovery. We invent biomaterials and engineering tools to elucidate and modulate biology, and also use biology to inform materials and engineering design. Our work is highly interdisciplinary, and is driven by unmet clinical needs or key gaps in biology.

  • Lu Yang

    Lu Yang

    Instructor, Pathology

    BioPhysician-scientist with broad interests in genetics/genomics, cell biology, developmental biology, cancer, clinical pathology, bioinformatics, and computer vision.

  • Phillip C. Yang, MD

    Phillip C. Yang, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Yang is a physician-scientist whose research interest focuses on clinical translation of the fundamental molecular and cellular processes of myocardial restoration. His research employs novel in vivo multi-modality molecular and cellular imaging technology to translate the basic innovation in cardiovascular pluripotent stem cell biologics. Dr. Yang is currently a PI on the NIH/NHLBI funded CCTRN UM1 grant, which is designed to conduct multi-center clinical trial on novel biological therapy.

  • Priscilla Li-ning Yang

    Priscilla Li-ning Yang

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe apply chemical biology approaches to study fundamental virological processes and to develop antivirals with novel mechanisms of action.

  • Samuel Yang, MD, FACEP

    Samuel Yang, MD, FACEP

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine (Adult Clinical/Academic)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Yang's research is focused on bridging the translational gap at the interface of molecular biology, genome science, engineering, and acute care medicine. The investigative interest of the Yang lab falls within the general theme of developing integrative systems-level approaches for precision diagnostics, as well as data driven knowledge discoveries, to improve the health outcome and our understanding of complex critical illnesses. Using sepsis and COVID-19 as the disease models with complex host-pathogen dynamics, the goals of the Yang lab are divided into 2 areas:

    1) Developing high-content, near-patient, diagnostic system for rapid broad pathogen detection and characterization.

    2) Integrating multi-omics molecular and phenotypic data layers with novel computational approaches into advanced diagnostics and predictive analytics for acute infections.

  • Yanmin Yang

    Yanmin Yang

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Neurology Research Faculty)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElucidate biological functions of cytoskeletal associated proteins in neurons. Define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in null mice.

  • Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsYang’ lab's research interests are in the areas of bio-inspired biomaterials, medical devices, and 3D printing approaches for re-creating a suitable microenvironment for cell growth and tissue regeneration for musculoskeletal disease diagnosis and treatment, including multiple tissue healing such as rotator cuff injury, orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, and orthopedic traumas such as massive bone and muscle injuries.

  • Caely Hambro Yanikoglu, MD

    Caely Hambro Yanikoglu, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Dermatology

    BioDr. Caely Yanikoglu is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Stanford. Dr. Yanikoglu received her Bachelor of Science degree with distinction from the University of Michigan. She received her medical degree from Columbia University in New York, where she was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society. She completed her residency in dermatology at Stanford University Medical Center and served as chief resident in her final year. Dr. Yanikoglu’s clinical interest is general medical dermatology, including skin cancer, acne, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and dermatologic surgery.

  • Jeffrey Yao, MD

    Jeffrey Yao, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
    On Leave from 02/15/2024 To 03/15/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Minimally invasive and arthroscopic treatment alternatives for common hand and wrist disorders
    2. Biologic augmentation of tendon repair strategies utilizing stem cells

  • Seema Yasmin

    Seema Yasmin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioSeema Yasmin is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, poet, medical doctor and author. Yasmin served as an officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention where she investigated disease outbreaks and was principal investigator on a number of CDC studies. Yasmin trained in journalism at the University of Toronto and in medicine at the University of Cambridge.

    Yasmin was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news in 2017 with a team from The Dallas Morning News for coverage of a mass shooting, and recipient of an Emmy for her reporting on neglected diseases. She received multiple grants from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for coverage of gender based violence in India and the aftermath of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. In 2017, Yasmin was a John S. Knight Fellow in Journalism at Stanford University investigating the spread of health misinformation and disinformation during public health crises. Previously she was a science correspondent at The Dallas Morning News, medical analyst for CNN, and professor of public health at the University of Texas at Dallas. She teaches crisis management and crisis communication at the UCLA Anderson School of Management as a Visiting Assistant Professor.

    She is the author of eight non-fiction, fiction, poetry and childrens books, including: What the Fact?! Finding the Truth in All the Noise (Simon and Schuster, 2022); Viral BS: Medical Myths and Why We Fall For Them (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021); Muslim Women Are Everything: Stereotype-Shattering Stories of Courage, Inspiration and Adventure (HarperCollins, 2020); If God Is A Virus: Poems (Haymarket, 2021); Unbecoming: A Novel (Simon and Schuster, 2024); Djinnology: An Illuminated Compendium of Spirits and Stories from the Muslim World (Chronicle, 2024); and The ABCs of Queer History (Workman Books, 2024). Her writing appears in The New York Times, Rolling Stone, WIRED, Scientific American and other outlets.

    Yasmin’s unique expertise in epidemics and communications has been called upon by the Vatican, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, the Aspen Institute, the Skoll Foundation, the Biden White House, and others. She teaches a new paradigm for trust-building and evidence-based communication to leadership at the World Health Organization and CDC. In 2019, she was the inaugural director of the Stanford Health Communication Initiative.

    Her scholarly work focuses on the spread of scientific misinformation and disinformation, information equity, and the varied susceptibilities of different populations to false information about health and science. In 2020, she received a fellowship from the Emerson Collective for her work on inequitable access to health information. She teaches multimedia storytelling to medical students in the REACH program.

  • Jiangbin Ye

    Jiangbin Ye

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOne hallmark of cancer is that malignant cells modulate metabolic pathways to promote cancer progression. My professional interest is to investigate the causes and consequences of the abnormal metabolic phenotypes of cancer cells in response to microenvironmental stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, with the prospect that therapeutic approaches might be developed to target these metabolic pathways to improve cancer treatment.

  • Jason Yeatman

    Jason Yeatman

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics), of Education and of Psychology

    BioDr. Jason Yeatman is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Department of Psychology at Stanford University and the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Yeatman completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford where he studied the neurobiology of literacy and developed new brain imaging methods for studying the relationship between brain plasticity and learning. After finishing his PhD, he took a faculty position at the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences before returning to Stanford.

    As the director of the Brain Development and Education Lab, the overarching goal of his research is to understand the mechanisms that underlie the process of learning to read, how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia, and to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences. His lab employs a collection of structural and functional neuroimaging measurements to study how a child’s experience with reading instruction shapes the development of brain circuits that are specialized for this unique cognitive function.

  • Ann Ming Yeh

    Ann Ming Yeh

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioDr. Ann Ming Yeh is a Clinical Professor at Stanford University in Pediatric Gastroenterology and practices at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital and Stanford Children’s Health. She completed her residency and GI fellowship at Stanford University.

    Dr. Yeh’s research interests include diet therapies for inflammatory bowel disease, nutrition, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and integrative medicine for pediatric gastroenterology. She has presented her work on fatty liver, inflammatory bowel disease and integrative medicine at national meetings.

    She completed a two-year distance learning fellowship through the University of Arizona’s Center for Integrative Medicine where she gained additional expertise in mind-body therapies, botanicals, and nutritional supplements. With skill and compassion, Dr. Yeh treats her patients with a comprehensive, evidence-based, holistic approach. She is also a formally trained and board-certified medical acupuncturist. She is currently the program director for the nation’s premier fellowship for Pediatric Integrative Medicine at Stanford.

    Outside of medicine, she enjoys yoga, gardening, hiking, and traveling with her family.

  • Ellen Yeh

    Ellen Yeh

    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe chemistry and biology of the unusual plastid organelle, the apicoplast, in malaria parasites

  • Jennifer Elynn Yeh, MD PhD

    Jennifer Elynn Yeh, MD PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Dermatology

    BioDr. Jennifer E. Yeh, M.D. Ph.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Yeh graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi with a B.S. in chemical & biological engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She received her M.D. and Ph.D. from Harvard Medical School, where she studied molecular modulators of the oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 and received the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Cancer Institute. She completed her internship in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital followed by Dermatology residency in the Harvard Combined Dermatology Program where she served as Chief Resident during her final year.

    Dr. Yeh co-directs a Dermatology-Rheumatology multidisciplinary clinic with a focus on autoimmune connective tissue diseases with Dr. Yashaar Chaichian (Rheumatology). Her clinical interests also include acne, eczema, psoriasis, and skin cancer. She has a special interest in medical education and serves as Co-Director of the Medical Dermatology curriculum for the Stanford Dermatology Residency Program. She also serves as the department's Wellbeing Director, championing initiatives to enhance professional fulfillment and reduce burnout.

  • Lahia Yemane

    Lahia Yemane

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy scholarship interests are focused on creating and evaluating diversity and inclusion programs to support UIM GME trainees and facilitators and interventions that support the recruitment, inclusion, and retention of UIM trainees.

  • Ruth E.H. Yemane, MD

    Ruth E.H. Yemane, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - General

    BioDr. Yemane is a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist with the LGBTQ+ Health Program and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She offers full-spectrum gynecologic care and specializes in caring for people who identify as gender and sexual minorities. She prepares personalized, comprehensive care plans, delivered with compassion.

    Dr. Yemane’s research interests include expanding access to safe obstetric and gynecologic care for LGBTQ+ populations. One of her noteworthy studies examined perceptions and patterns of cervical cancer among women in the patient population.

    Dr. Yemane has shared her research at local and national conferences. She has appeared on podcasts to discuss transgender health care and how to make obstetric and gynecologic care more LGBTQ+-friendly.

    Dr. Yemane is a member of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists, the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  • Sophia Yen, MD, MPH

    Sophia Yen, MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Adolescent Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEmergency contraception access, availability, knowledge.

    Pediatric obesity and its treament with videogames and pedometers.

    Adolescent use and access to contraception.

    Using computers to educate patients during waiting time.

    Determinants of Tampon use/initiation.

    Health needs of adolescents in local high schools. Obesity, exercise, mental health, reproductive health.

    Attitudes towards a reproductive health clinic - parents perspective, adolescents.

  • Gwen Yeo

    Gwen Yeo

    Sr Research Scholar, Medicine - Family & Community Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEthnicity and Dementia
    Ethnogeriatric Education
    Ethnogeriatric Care

  • David C. Yeomans

    David C. Yeomans

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    On Partial Leave from 12/01/2023 To 11/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysiology of different pain types; Biomarkers of pain and inflammation; Gene Therapy for Pain

  • Jerome Yesavage

    Jerome Yesavage

    Jared and Mae Tinklenberg Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study cognitive processes and aging in our research center. Studies range from molecular biology to neuropsychology of cognitive processes.

  • Alan Yeung, MD

    Alan Yeung, MD

    Li Ka Shing Professor in Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCoronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in the United States. Our group is interested in studying both the early and late phases of atherosclerosis so that we can better develop prevention and treatment strategies.

  • Serena Yeung

    Serena Yeung

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Serena Yeung is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research focus is on developing artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to enable new capabilities in biomedicine and healthcare. She has extensive expertise in deep learning and computer vision, and has developed computer vision algorithms for analyzing diverse types of visual data ranging from video capture of human behavior, to medical images and cell microscopy images.

    Dr. Yeung leads the Medical AI and Computer Vision Lab at Stanford. She is affiliated with the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Clinical Excellence Research Center, the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging, the Center for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Bio-X. She also serves on the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Artificial Intelligence.

  • Maame Yaa A. B. Yiadom

    Maame Yaa A. B. Yiadom

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine (Adult Clinical/Academic)

    BioDr. Yiadom is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University and researcher with expertise in emergency care clinical operations and timely emergency care delivery. She was first trained in health care policy in Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs. She subsequently worked as a healthcare industry management consultant here in New York City for CSC Global Health Solutions Group, and was the Dean’s Office Chief of Staff at Drexel Medical School in Philadelphia. She completed her medical education at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, a Masters in Public Health (MPH) at Harvard with additional health policy training from Johns Hopkins. She subsequently did residency at Mass General and Brigham and Women’s Hospitals’ Harvard affiliated program, and completed a Masters of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI) at Vanderbilt University.

    Dr. Yiadom is the Principal Investigator for the Stanford Emergency Care Health Services Research Data Coordinating Center (HSR-DCC). Her research focuses on applications of evidence-based medicine to optimize clinical operations to target patient pathophysiology for time-sensitive conditions. STEMI is her prototype disease. Her group's primary methodologies include clinical practice epidemiology, workflow variability analysis, and clinically applied artificial intelligence. Current work includes refining clinical process, using informatics to support evidence-based practice, and performance measurement to identify real-world care improvement opportunities. Her research is supported by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and ED Benchmarking Alliance. She is the Founding Director of the Emergency Department Operations Study Group (EDOSG), and on the Board of Directors for the Emergency Department Benchmarking Alliance (EDBA). The lab website is: https://yiadom-hsrdcc.com

    Her interest in population health via emergency care have extended to Haiti, Guyana and Ghana. She and her husband Ryan Van Cleave (Airforce veteran, elementary school teacher, a training pilot, and Northern California native) have 3 children.

  • Paul Yock, MD

    Paul Yock, MD

    Emeritus Faculty, Acad Council, Miscellaneous

    BioYock began his faculty career as an interventional cardiologist at UC San Francisco and then moved to Stanford in 1994. Yock is known for his work in inventing, developing and testing new devices, including the Rapid Exchange angioplasty and stenting system, which is the primary approach used worldwide. Yock also authored the fundamental patents for intravascular ultrasound imaging, conducted the initial clinical trials and established the Stanford Center for Research in Cardiovascular Interventions as a core laboratory for analysis of intravascular ultrasound clinical studies. He also invented the Smart Needle and is a co-inventor of the strain-reduction patch for wound healing. Yock was founding Co-Chair of the Department of Bioengineering and continues research related to new device technologies. Yock also was the founding director of the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign -dedicated to advanced training in medical technology innovation.

  • Celina Yong, MD, MBA, MSc

    Celina Yong, MD, MBA, MSc

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioCelina Yong, MD, MBA, MSc is Director of Interventional Cardiology at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center and an Associate Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford. Dr. Yong completed her medical training at Stanford School of Medicine and her internal medicine residency at the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her cardiology and interventional cardiology fellowships at Stanford, including serving as Chief Fellow. As a Marshall Scholar, she completed a Masters in Health Policy, Planning and Financing from the London School of Economics and an MBA from Oxford.

    Dr. Yong’s current research focuses on understanding and reducing inequities in cardiovascular care for patients, as well as resolving gender imbalances in the medical profession itself. She is actively involved in clinical trials of novel devices for percutaneous coronary and structural intervention, and performs structural and coronary interventions at the Palo Alto VA Hospital.

  • Audrey Yoon, DDS

    Audrey Yoon, DDS

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Sleep Medicine

    BioDr. Yoon is a double board-certified sleep specialist with the Stanford Health Care Sleep Medicine Center. She is currently a Clinical Professor in the Division of Sleep Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She uses her extensive orthodontic experience to diagnose and treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children and adults. Dr. Yoon specializes in surgical and non-surgical OSA treatments, such as miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion (MARPE), distraction osteogenesis maxillary expansion (DOME), and maxillomandibular advancement (MMA). These procedures restructure the palate, nasal airway, or jaw to improve airflow.

    Her research interests include modifying head and face growth to improve sleep-disordered breathing in children and creating customized appliances that help reshape bones in the mouth, jaw, and face over time. She has also studied genetic anatomical factors related to OSA. Dr. Yoon worked with Stanford Medicine researchers to develop a new DOME technique, and she established and proposed a surgery-first approach protocol for MMA. With this approach, doctors surgically reposition the jaw before starting orthodontic treatment. The surgery-first approach can reduce the amount of time patients need to undergo orthodontic treatment.

    Dr. Yoon has published in many peer-reviewed journals, including Sleep, Sleep Medicine, the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and she has written numerous book chapters. She has presented to her colleagues all over the nation and the world, including those in Germany, Italy, Australia, Chile, Singapore and China. Her presentations have covered a range of topics, such as the latest techniques in craniofacial (head and face) growth modification.

    Dr. Yoon is a founding co-president of the World Dentofacial Sleep Society. She established a dental sleep medicine specialty clinic in the Division of Sleep Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. She also established the Dental Sleep Medicine Clinic at the University of the Pacific and is currently a program director of the Pacific Ortho-Dental Sleep Medicine Fellowship Program. Dr. Yoon also serves on the board of directors for the California Sleep Society, Angle Orthodontists, and the Korean Association of Dental Sleep Medicine.

    She is a diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics and the American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine.

  • Jong H. Yoon

    Jong H. Yoon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health & Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research seeks to discover the brain mechanisms responsible for schizophrenia and to translate this knowledge into the clinic to improve how we diagnose and treat this condition. Towards these ends, our group has been developing cutting-edge neuroimaging tools to identify neurobiological abnormalities and test novel systems-level disease models of psychosis and schizophrenia directly in individuals with these conditions.

    We have been particularly interested in the role of neocortical-basal ganglia circuit dysfunction. A working hypothesis is that some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia are attributable to impairments in neocortical function that results in disconnectivity with components of the basal ganglia and dysregulation of their activity. The Yoon Lab has developed new high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging methods to more precisely measure the function of basal ganglia components, which given their small size and location deep within the brain has been challenging. This includes ways to measure the activity of nuclei that store and control the release of dopamine throughout the brain, a neurochemical that is one of the most important factors in the production of psychosis in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions.

  • Luke Yoon, MD

    Luke Yoon, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology

    BioLuke Yoon, MD, is a Clinical Associate Professor and Associate Chair of Faculty Well-being and Development in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Yoon is a radiologist specializing in body imaging and musculoskeletal imaging. A graduate of Yale College and Yale School of Medicine, Dr. Yoon completed his post-graduate training at Harvard affiliated hospitals: internal medicine internship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and radiology residency and fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital. Prior to joining Stanford Radiology, Dr. Yoon worked as an attending radiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Singleton Associates, and Baylor College of Medicine. His clinical interests include physician well-being, cystic renal mass imaging, and liver mass classification.

  • Dokyoung Sophia You, PhD

    Dokyoung Sophia You, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioI am interested in investigating the role of stress and emotion regulatory system in chronic pain and substance use. I am also interested in identifying EEG markers for critical psychological and neurocognitive factors contributing to worsening or improving pain symptoms and substance use disorder. Ultimately, my research goal is to develop mechanisms-based psychological interventions for patients suffering from chronic pain to optimize pain management strategies with less medications and substances and to help patients live meaningful life.

  • Kyan Younes, MD

    Kyan Younes, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Younes is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His areas of expertise include the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, Lewy body dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus and cognitive and behavioral impairments. For each patient, Dr. Younes develops a personalized plan of care. A plan may include his close collaboration with experts from psychiatry, nursing, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other specialties. His goal is to ensure that each patient receives care that is both comprehensive and compassionate.

    To help lead advances and innovations in his field, Dr. Younes conducts extensive research. He is studying the clinical, neuropsychological, socioemotional, genetic, and pathological features when a patient experiences degeneration of the right anterior temporal lobe area of the brain. This disorder can affect a person’s ability to process emotions and person-specific knowledge.

    He also is researching how multimodal brain imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combined with machine learning can help improve the detection of neurodegenerative diseases. In other research, he has participated in clinical trials of new drug therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

    Dr. Younes has presented research findings at meetings of the American Neurological Association, American Academy of Neurology, and American Psychiatric Association. Topics have included predictors of cognitive performance in dementia.

    He has co-authored research articles published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Journal of Neuroimaging, and elsewhere. Subjects of these articles have included guidelines for diagnosing the effects of right anterior temporal lobe degeneration on behavior, treatment for symptoms of encephalitis, and the impact of mild traumatic brain injury on healthy older adults.

    Dr. Younes has written chapters on frontotemporal dementia for Psychiatric Clinics as well as the epilepsy, coma, acute ischemic stroke, meningitis and encephalitis chapters for the textbook The Little Black Book of Neurology.

    He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Alzheimer’s Association, and International Society for Frontotemporal Dementias.

  • Christina Young

    Christina Young

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Christina Young obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology as well as her MS in Statistics at Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the University of Illinois Chicago where she specialized in neuropsychology. She continued her neuropsychology training as well as her research during her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University.

    Dr. Young's research focuses on identifying real-world declines in cognition that track with the pathological changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias. Her work incorporates novel measures of cognition as well as neuroimaging to improve the detection and monitoring of early cognitive decline in the context of AD and related dementias. She has been awarded grant funding through a K99/R00 from the NIH and an Alzheimer's Association Research Fellowship to Promote Diversity (AARF-D) from the Alzheimer's Association.

  • Shady Younis

    Shady Younis

    Instructor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioShady Younis, PhD is an instructor at the division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Medical Sciences from Uppsala University in Sweden. He later joined Dr. William Robinson’s Lab at Stanford University as Wallenberg postdoctoral fellow, where he characterized the pathogenic role of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in rheumatoid arthritis. His current research aimed at elucidating the underlying triggers of pathogenic B cell responses in a spectrum of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS). He uses computational methodologies alongside cutting-edge high-throughput sequencing technologies to characterize the autoreactive B and T cells. The overarching research objective of his research is to unravel the mechanistic roles of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) reactivation in activating and transforming autoreactive B cells in the development of autoimmunity.

  • Bo Yu, MD

    Bo Yu, MD

    Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Yu’s lab is interested in ovarian physiology and pathology, as well as assisted reproductive technologies (ART).

  • Charles Yu MD

    Charles Yu MD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCorneal opacity is a leading cause of blindness. Cornea transplantation is at high risk of rejection when there is pre-existing vascularization of the cornea and in pediatric patients. Cornea transplant shortage remains a worldwide problem with millions on waitlists. Our laboratory is developing multiple strategies for treatment of corneal blindness. We are testing advanced materials and designs for keratoprostheses with the goal of reducing complications and easing surgical implantation. We are also developing intraocular electronic display prostheses for bypassing cornea opacity, a novel strategy that could allow for high quality vision without corneal clarity.

  • Grace Chen Yu

    Grace Chen Yu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Yu is a modern-day version of the “old-fashioned family doc” who delights in caring for patients from “cradle to grave,” while also promoting the health of her community and developing the future leaders of family medicine. On any particular day, one might find her counseling a long-time smoker on quitting, draining an abscess in clinic, delivering a baby, doing a phone (or sometimes home) visit with one of her elderly patients, lecturing about High-Value Health Care, facilitating a diabetes group visit, singing the praises of coordinated primary care to politicians, discussing end-of-life options with a hospitalized patient, or sharing some of her stories as mother-doctor-teacher with one of her advisees. In 2016, adding one more hat to the mix, Dr. Yu became Program Director of the 24-resident Stanford Health Care - O’Connor Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program. Whereas the old-fashioned family doc was a master at caring for patients at different ages and stages of life, as a modern-day family physician, Dr. Yu is committed to researching ways to do so more effectively and efficiently. She considers it a privilege to be a part of her patients' lives and hopes to help both her patients and her trainees find a path to better health and happiness. To keep herself in great health, Dr. Yu enjoys playing the piano, photography, scuba diving, adventure travel (all the more adventurous with her three children in tow!), and spending time with her family and friends.

  • Muharrem Yunce, M.D.

    Muharrem Yunce, M.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    BioDr. Yunce is board certified in internal medicine and transfusion medicine. He joined Stanford Health Care as a clinical fellow and completed his fellowship in July 2019. He has keen interest in patient blood management and applications of therapeutic apheresis in various disease processes.

  • Ilana Rachel Yurkiewicz

    Ilana Rachel Yurkiewicz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Yurkiewicz is a primary care doctor with fellowship training and board certification in internal medicine, oncology, and hematology. She is a clinical assistant professor of primary care and population health in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She provides expert, compassionate clinical care for patients, advocates for them as a medical journalist, and researches ways to improve their lives through better health and quality of life.

    She has a special interest in cancer survivorship and improving transitions between oncology and primary care. Her practice is uniquely focused on providing comprehensive care for patients with a history of cancer as well as those carrying genetic diagnoses of elevated risk.

    For each patient, her goal is to provide thoughtful, compassionate, and holistic care.

    As a journalist, she strives to bridge the gaps between academic medicine and everyday lives. She has been a regular columnist for Scientific American and MDEdge. Her writing has appeared in numerous publications and been reprinted in The Atlantic and The Best American Science and Nature Writing anthology.

    Dr. Yurkiewicz is the author of the book Fragmented: A Doctor’s Quest to Piece Together American Health Care from the publisher W.W. Norton.

    She has co-authored research articles that appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, American Journal of Clinical Oncology, Genetics in Medicine, and other peer-reviewed publications. She also has served as an editorial board member of the journal Hematology News.

    An additional interest of Dr. Yurkiewicz is bioethics. She interned with the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, conducted extensive research, and published her discoveries in the New England Journal of Medicine, Penn Bioethics Journal, and Ivy Journal of Ethics.

    She has presented her research discoveries to her peers at meetings of the American Society of Hematology, Society of Hospital Medicine, National Society of Genetic Counselors, and elsewhere.

    She is a member of the American College of Physicians and an associate member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and American Society of Hematology.