School of Medicine


Showing 1-100 of 130 Results

  • Bruce T. Adornato

    Bruce T. Adornato

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Adornato joined the Department of Neurology as Voluntary Clinical Faculty in 1978, (subsequently Adjunct Clinical Faculty) and has served as Director of the Neuromuscular Laboratory from 1978 until 1983, performing and interpreting nerve and muscle biopsies as well as serving as attending physician directing residents and medical students in the diagnosis and care of his private patients admitted to Stanford Hospital. Since 1986, he has been attending physician at the Palo Alto VA Hospital, directing Stanford Neurology residents and medical students in the care of veterans. He has published 69 peer reviewed papers and a number of book chapters in the field of neurology. He is currently the medical officer of a silicon valley startup exploring mobility devices for the neurologically impaired.

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group’'s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of advanced imaging techniques to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Meredith Barad, MD

    Meredith Barad, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests involve novel treatment paradigms for challenging pain problems such as orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia and low pressure headaches. I am also interested in migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias and their intersection with chronic pain.

  • Richard Baron, MD

    Richard Baron, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Baron is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist in the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic and the Vestibular Balance Disorders Program. He is also clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences and, by courtesy, in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received fellowship training in both headache medicine and otoneurology (dizziness and vestibular disorders) at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He specializes in diagnosing, managing, and treating the many causes of headache, facial pain, and dizziness. To provide the highest level of care, he takes a detailed history, performs a specialized physical exam, and collaborates with colleagues across the Stanford Health Care system. Dr. Baron develops a comprehensive care plan customized for each patient. He specializes in non-medication options, nerve blocks and other advanced treatments, Botox® injections, and the latest headache medications and devices.

    Dr. Baron has a particular interest in the management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), which results from pressure around the brain and causes headaches and problems with vision. He has established a multidisciplinary group of Stanford Health Care doctors to improve and coordinate care for people with IIH. The group includes doctors from several departments, including neuro-ophthalmology, neurosurgery, interventional radiology, and bariatric surgery and medical weight loss. They work together to determine the most effective medical and procedural treatments.

    Dr. Baron also has a strong interest in the evaluation of acute vestibular syndromes and the management of dizziness in the emergency room. He has published in Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, and Translational Behavioral Medicine. He has also written several chapters for the Stanford Neurology Resident Handbook. He has presented his research at conferences throughout the United States, and he is heavily involved with quality improvement projects and educating resident physicians.

    Dr. Baron is a member of the American Headache Society, American Academy of Neurology, Catholic Medical Association, and Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic and clinical research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how they affect short-term brain injury and long term outcomes like dementia and depression.

  • Felix Chang, MD

    Felix Chang, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Felix Chang's clinical practice mainly involves intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring (IONM) and the treatment of neurological disorders with botulinum toxin. He earned his medical degree at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He completed his neurology residency at the Harvard Neurology Program at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He then went on to complete a fellowship in clinical neurophysiology with a focus in intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring at Stanford.

  • S. Charles Cho, MD

    S. Charles Cho, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research focused on peripheral nerve and muscle disorders. Also involved with prevention of cerebrovascular disesase in the intraoperative setting. Ongoing clincial studies include treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy and HIV neuropathic pain.

  • Robert P. Cowan, MD, FAAN, FAHS

    Robert P. Cowan, MD, FAAN, FAHS

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest focus on patient education technology and patient/physician communication with a particular emphasis on tools which increase encounter efficiency and improve outcomes. Basic research focuses on mechanisms of action in Chronic Daily Headache, with a particular emphasis on New Daily Persistent Headache. Techniques include fMRI, biomarker investigation and evoked potentials. Clinical research includes clinical trials of novel treatments for episodic and chronic headache forms.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology), of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology
    On Partial Leave from 03/15/2024 To 06/15/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Les Dorfman, MD

    Les Dorfman, MD

    Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical electrophysiology of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including nerve conduction velocity; electromyography (EMG); and visual, auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. Multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and treatment. Neurological education.

  • Rachelle Dugue, MD, PhD

    Rachelle Dugue, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Dugue is a board-certified neurologist within the Neurohospitalist Division. She cares for patients at both Stanford Health Care and Stanford Health Care Tri-Valley. She received her MD and PhD at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, where she completed a thesis studying novel treatments for traumatic brain injury. Dr. Dugue then completed her neurology residency at Columbia University Medical Center-New York Presbyterian, followed by a vascular neurology fellowship at Stanford University Hospital.

    Dr. Dugue provides comprehensive, individualized care for patients with a wide range of neurological conditions. She has been recognized for her dedication to excellence in patient care, medical education, and student mentorship.

    Her research interests are centered on health equity in neurology care and clinical trials, stroke, and neuroinfectious disease. Dr. Dugue has published in multiple peer-reviewed journals, including The Neurohospitalist, Practical Neurology, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, and Neurology.

  • Shefali Dujari, MD

    Shefali Dujari, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Dujari is a board-certified neurologist and fellowship-trained neurohospitalist, specializing in the care of acute neurologic disorders. She practices at both Stanford Hospital and Stanford ValleyCare. She completed her medical training at Boston University, internal medicine preliminary year at California Pacific Medical Center, neurology residency at Stanford University, and neurohospitalist fellowship at Stanford University. She serves as the Neurology Resident & Fellow Wellness & Mentoring Committee faculty lead, the associated program director of the Stanford Neurohospitalist Fellowship, and the physician lead of the ValleyCare Neuroscience Quality Committee. She has a special interest in medical education and quality improvement.

    For more information on the Stanford Neurohospitalist Program & Fellowship, please visit: https://med.stanford.edu/neurology/divisions/neurohospitalist.html

  • Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in the human application of emerging immunotherapies for neurological disease, focusing on Multiple Sclerosis, CIS, transverse myelitis and Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO). Collaborative research with Stanford and extramural scientific faculty to identify biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in humans. Clinical trials to assess efficacy of emerging treatments for MS, CIS and NMO.

  • Emmanuel During, MD

    Emmanuel During, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving diagnostics and therapeutics in RBD, using home ambulatory devices including wearable actigraphy, dry-EEG, to power clinical trials based on objective outcomes of RBD activity.

    Controlling symptoms of RBD testing drugs rigorously.

    Predicting the course of neurodegeneration using deep phenotyping using clinical and serum biomarkers, measures of autonomic impairment, skin biopsy, microbiome

  • Rouzbeh Fateh, MD

    Rouzbeh Fateh, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Fateh is a fellowship-trained neurologist, specializing in neuromuscular disorders. He is an assistant professor with the Stanford School of Medicine Department of Neurology. His background includes extensive work in neurology, mental health, and neurodevelopmental disabilities.

    His practice focuses on providing comprehensive care for complex neurological and neuromuscular diseases. His expertise includes neuropathies, myopathies, and other brain and nerve-related disorders. He is board-certified in neurology, clinical neurophysiology, and electrodiagnostic medicine.

    Dr. Fateh was involved in research related to neurodevelopmental disabilities and multiple sclerosis. His work has been published in international journals such as Swiss Medical Weekly and The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry.

    He has also given numerous presentations in different meetings including annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Additional languages spoken: Farsi, Turkish (Azeri dialect)

  • Margaret S. Ferris, MD

    Margaret S. Ferris, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Ferris is a fellowship-trained neurologist and Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology, Division of Movement Disorders.

    She diagnoses and treats a breath of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor. She recognizes the broad effects of these conditions on daily living and aims to develop personalized, comprehensive treatment plans that optimize health and quality of life.

    Dr. Ferris research interests focus on access to interventional therapies for movement disorders. She has participated in investigations sponsored by the National Institutes of to evaluate advanced treatments for complications of Parkinson’s disease.

    She has co-authored articles in publications such as Nature, The Neurohospitalist, and BioMed Central (BMC) Genomics. She has presented her insights about innovations in the understanding, detection, and management of movement disorders at conferences including, the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, Pan American Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Congress.

    She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the Movement Disorder Society.

  • Anna Finley Caulfield, MD

    Anna Finley Caulfield, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Finley joined the Stanford Stroke Center in 2004 from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. She cares for acute stroke patients and other neurologically critical ill patients in the intensive care unit. Currently, her research interests include hypothermia after cardiac arrest and comparing health care provider's predications of future neurological function in neurologically critical ill patients to their 6-month outcome.

  • Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    The Maslah Saul, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fisher is interested in clincal, laboratory and translational aspects of epilepsy research. Prior work has included: electrical deep brain stimulation for epilepsy, studied in laboratory models and clinical trials; drug delivery to a seizure focus; mechanisms of absence epilepsy studied with in vitro slices of brain thalamus; hyperthermic seizures; diagnosis and treatment of non-epileptic seizures, the post-ictal state; driving and epilepsy; new antiepileptic drugs; surgery for epilepsy.

  • Andrea Fuentes

    Andrea Fuentes

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Fuentes is a board-certified neurologist with the Movement Disorders Center at Stanford Health Care. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences. Dr. Fuentes completed a movement disorders fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

    She provides comprehensive care for patients with different types of movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian disorders, essential tremor, ataxia, dystonia, and chorea. As part of her clinical practice, she performs deep brain stimulation (DBS) evaluation and programming and botulinum toxin injections.

    Her research efforts include several clinical trials assessing treatments for movement disorders. She has been a sub-investigator on multiple trials evaluating drug candidates for the treatment of PD and ataxia. She has presented her work at national and international meetings, including those for the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society and the American College of Physicians.

    Dr. Fuentes is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  • Kristin Galetta, MD

    Kristin Galetta, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Galetta is a board-certified neurologist within the Neurohospitalist and Neuroimmunology divisions. She completed a multiple sclerosis (MS) fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

    She has extensive experience diagnosing and treating patients with autoimmune neurologic conditions including multiple sclerosis, optic neuritis, autoimmune encephalitis and transverse myelitis. Her research interests are focused on understanding best treatment strategies for patients with multiple sclerosis and more rare autoimmune neurologic conditions. She also has an interest in medical education improvement.

    She has published in numerous peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Neurological Sciences and Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders. She is a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including Neurology and Frontiers in Neurology.

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.

  • Carl Gold

    Carl Gold

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Gold is a board-certified neurologist who is fellowship-trained in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders in hospitalized patients. He cares for a broad range of patients, including individuals with seizures, central nervous system infections, autoimmune diseases, headaches, neuromuscular conditions, and neurological complications of cancer. Dr. Gold's primary research interest focuses on enhancing the communication skills of neurology residents, and he serves as the Director of the Stanford Neurology Residency Communication Coaching Program. He is also the Fellowship Director of the Stanford Neurohospitalist Fellowship.

    Dr. Gold serves as Vice Chair of Quality, Safety, & Experience for the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences. In this role, he coordinates projects aimed at improving care for patients with neurological conditions across the health system.

    For more information on the Stanford Neurohospitalist Program & Fellowship, please visit: https://med.stanford.edu/neurology/divisions/neurohospitalist.html

    Learn more about the Stanford Neurology Communication Coaching Program by visiting: http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/education/resident-coaching.html

    Additional information on Stanford Neurology's efforts in Quality, Safety, & Value can be found here: http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/quality.html

  • Olga Fedin Goldberg

    Olga Fedin Goldberg

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Goldberg is board-certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She provides comprehensive neurologic care to patients with a broad range of neurologic conditions, including those who have multiple neurologic conditions. She is interested in medical education for neurology residents and for referring primary care providers and serves as Director of Neurology Resident Continuity Clinic. Additionally, she completed the Stanford CELT (Clinical Education Leadership Training) Program for developing skills in quality improvement. She has led or played a key role in multiple quality improvement projects in the Department of Neurology, including those focused on increasing patient understanding of their neurologic medications upon hospital discharge, improvement of outcomes for headache patients seen in primary care, and in optimizing clinic processes involved in collection of cerebrospinal fluid.

  • Neelam Goyal, MD

    Neelam Goyal, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Goyal's research interests involve monitoring and managing the short and long-term toxicity of immunosuppressive agents used in the treatment of immune-mediated neuromuscular disorders. She is actively involved in a grant-supported project investigating steroid toxicity in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    She also serves as the Wellbeing Co-Director for the Neurology Department, working on a grant-supported project aimed at mitigating the adverse impact of work on personal relationships.

  • Maxwell Greene, MD

    Maxwell Greene, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Greene is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist. He is also a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Greene provides clinical care for adult patients with disorders of the muscles and peripheral nerves that cause weakness and numbness. He specializes in diagnosing and treating neuromuscular diseases that include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), all types of muscular dystrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), myasthenia gravis, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). For CIDP and CMT, Stanford is one of the few centers of excellence in the country.

    A significant part of Dr. Greene’s practice involves investigational work, where he seeks to determine the cause of a patient’s symptoms. In addition to performing the full range of diagnostic tests including interpreting biopsy procedures, he has special qualifications in electrodiagnosis and the use of electromyography and nerve conduction studies.

    Treatments offered by Dr. Greene cover the complete spectrum of options, with an emphasis on immune therapies for certain conditions. For CIDP and myasthenia gravis, he administers immune globulin, steroids, plasmapheresis, and rituximab. To help manage symptoms of CMT and support areas of the body weakened by this disease, he can recommend physical therapy, occupational therapy, and foot, ankle, and knee orthotics.

    For the treatment of ALS and muscular dystrophy, Dr. Greene leads a multidisciplinary team offering physical and occupational therapy, pulmonary expertise, speech and swallow expertise, nutrition counseling, social services, and specialized nursing, and works together with genetic counseling. All team members collaborate closely to ensure patients receive the care and comfort needed to meet their emotional as well as physical needs.

    As part of his commitment to advancing patients’ treatment options, Dr. Greene conducts clinical research. Among his current interests are
    innovative new therapies for ALS and other nerve and muscular disorders. This is an exciting time in the field of neuromuscular medicine, with real potential for treatment breakthroughs for the first time in decades. Exploring these new directions enables Dr. Greene to offer Stanford patients access to options that may not be available anywhere else.

    To highlight new advances for his peers, Dr. Greene has made national and regional presentations at conferences including the American Academy of Neurology meeting. Topics include the results of a study supported in part by the National Institutes of Health: paraneoplastic antibodies as markers of Hodgkin’s disease. JAMA Neurology published Dr. Greene’s article on this research.

    Dr. Greene’s achievements have earned recognition from the American Academy of Neurology and other organizations. He is also the recipient of a travel award from the American Neurological Association and a grant from the NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

    A member of the American Academy of Neurology, Dr. Greene is also an active member of the Western ALS Consortium and Northeastern ALS Consortium.

  • Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Iqbal Farrukh and Asad Jamal Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Administrative and Academic Special Programs)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs the Medical Director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders and Principal Investigator of the Stanford Extreme Phenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease (StEP AD) Cohort, Dr. Greicius' research focuses on elucidating the neurobiologic underpinnings of AD. His lab combines cutting edge brain imaging, "deep" phenotyping, and whole-genome sequencing of human subjects to identify novel pathways involved in AD pathogenesis. The goal of his work is to develop effective treatment for AD patients.

  • Jin S. Hahn, MD

    Jin S. Hahn, MD

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Clinical informatics and electronic health records
    2. Neonatal and fetal neurology
    3. Prenatal diagnosis neurodevelopmental anomalies
    4. Personalized Health and Wellness Records

  • May Han, MD

    May Han, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMultiple sclerosis
    Neuromyelitis optica
    Autoimmune CNS disorders

  • Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Karen G. Hirsch cares for critically ill patients with neurologic disorders in the intensive care unit. Dr. Hirsch's research focuses on using continuous and discrete multi-modal data to develop phenotypes and identify signatures of treatment responsiveness in patients with coma after cardiac arrest. She is the Co-PI of PRECICECAP (PRecision Care In Cardiac ArrEst - ICECAP, NINDS R01 NS119825-01) and works closely with collaborators in data science at Stanford and with industry partners to apply machine learning analyses to the complex multi-modal ICU data. Dr. Hirsch also studies neuro-imaging in post-cardiac arrest coma and traumatic brain injury.

    Additional research interests include a broad array of topics and Dr. Hirsch greatly appreciates the importance of team science and collaboration. Along with colleagues in Biomedical Ethics, Dr. Hirsch studies brain death and organ donation with a focus on ethical challenges and prediction models. Along with colleagues in Cardiac Anesthesia and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Dr. Hirsch studies neurologic outcomes in patients on mechanical circulatory support including ECMO.

    Dr. Hirsch is broadly interested in improving neurologic outcomes after acute brain injury and identifying early phenotypes to guide precision medicine in neurocritical care, especially in patients with post-cardiac arrest brain injury.

  • John Hotson

    John Hotson

    Professor (Clinical) of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe response and recovery of human visual cortex, oculomotor systems and related cognitive functions after acquired neurological disorders is a main area of interest.

  • Ting-Ting Huang

    Ting-Ting Huang

    Associate Professor (Research) of Neurology (Adult Neurology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the role of oxygen free radicals in oxidative tissue damage and degeneration. Our research tools include transgenic and knockout mice and tissue culture cells for in vitro gene expression.

  • Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interests include autonomic disorders, small fiber neuropathies and the development of effective methods of testing and treating these disorders. Prior work has focused on small fiber painful and autonomic neuropathies; syndromes of orthostatic intolerance and syncope; gastrointestinal motility dysfunction; cyclic vomiting; protacted Gastroesophageal Reflux; non-allergic rhinitis syndromes; and the relationship between the autonomic nervous system and normal or abnormal sleep. Additional areas of interest include the neurology of phonation and swallowing disorders, and peripheral nerve injury and repair.

  • Jocelyn Jiao, MD

    Jocelyn Jiao, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Jiao is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist with the Movement Disorders Center at Stanford Health Care. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.

    Dr. Jiao has extensive experience providing comprehensive care for patients with different types of movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease. She is fellowship-trained in both movement disorders and hospice and palliative medicine. Dr. Jiao is developing an interdisciplinary neuropalliative clinic that emphasizes planning for the future and maximizes quality of life for people living with chronic neurological illness.

    Dr. Jiao’s research efforts include a pilot study assessing the impact of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s-related motor symptoms upon mood and pain. Specifically, this work focuses on identifying correlations between DBS targets and reductions in medications that address depression, anxiety, and impulsivity symptoms that result from Parkinson’s treatments. Dr. Jiao has also completed a pilot study focused upon narrative medicine interventions for people living with Parkinson’s disease.

    Dr. Jiao has published her work in multiple peer-reviewed journals, including Pain Medicine and the Journal of Neurosurgery. Dr. Jiao is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society , and the International Neuropalliative Care Society.

  • Maya Katz, MD

    Maya Katz, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Katz is a board-certified neurologist who specializes in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. She is also a clinical associate professor of neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In her clinical practice, she develops a comprehensive, compassionate treatment plan for every patient in her care. She excels at deep brain stimulation, neuromodulation, and other advanced treatment approaches. She also works closely with each patient’s caregivers and family members to help ensure optimal well-being and quality of life for all involved in the management of Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Lewy body dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, and other conditions.

    Her research activities include serving as a co-investigator of the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative funded by the Michael J. Fox Foundation. She is a site principal investigator for a National Institutes of Health-funded study of the application of palliative care to Parkinson’s disease. Previously, she was a co-investigator for studies of remote access to care for Parkinson’s disease and patient-centered outcomes in Parkinson’s disease, both funded by the National Parkinson Foundation.

    Dr. Katz has earned many honors, including the ”Advancing Parkinson’s Therapies” conference award from the Parkinson’s Foundation and the “Fostering New Directions in Research” award from the Movement Disorders Society. She won scholarships from Weill Cornell Medical College, the Joseph Collins Foundation, and Anna E. Ray Robinson Education Fund.

    She has presented her research findings at global meetings such as the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society and the International Palliative Care Society. She also has made presentations at national meetings of the American Academy of Neurology as well as regional conferences.

    She has authored numerous articles on the topics of outpatient palliative care for Parkinson’s disease, caregiver burden in Parkinson’s disease, virtual visits for Parkinson’s disease, and diagnosis of cervical dystonia. Her work has appeared in journals including Neurology, Annals of Palliative Medicine, Contemporary Clinical Trials, Movement Disorders Clinical Practice, and Neurotherapeutics.

    In addition, she is a reviewer for JAMA Neurology, the Journal of Neurological Sciences, Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, the brain imaging and stimulation section of Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, and Parkinsonism and Related
    Disorders.

    Dr. Katz is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society, Parkinson’s Foundation, Parkinson’s Study Group, American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and American Telemedicine Association. She also is an invited speaker at community support groups for people with Parkinson’s disease.

  • Lucas Kipp

    Lucas Kipp

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Kipp specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of neuroimmunological disorders, particularly demyelinating conditions such as multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. He is interested in translational research connecting expert MS clinicians, world-renown immunology laboratories, and advanced neuroimaging techniques to identify biomarkers of disease and treatment response.

  • Hannah Louise Kirsch, MD

    Hannah Louise Kirsch, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioHannah Louise Kirsch, MD is a board-certified neurologist and a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Neurocritical Care Division of the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Kirsch is also a hospitalist who pays special attention to delivering Stanford Health Care patients the best possible neurological care.

    She serves on the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke committee dedicated to coma and conditions related to consciousness. She has implemented numerous neurology-centered educational activities for health care professionals from diverse specialties, including training psychiatrists on the neuropsychiatric complications of COVID-19. She also has helped educate oncologists and hematologists regarding common neurological conditions among cancer patients.

    Dr. Kirsch has conducted research on a range of topics, including thrombotic complications in critically ill COVID-19 patients, advances in intracranial pressure monitoring, and predictors of outcomes in acute encephalitis. She has published her findings in Neurology, the Journal of Trauma, Emergency Medicine, and Procedures, among other journals.

    She has given presentations on topics including variations in coagulation among patients with cerebral hemorrhage and the association of cerebral pressure with cardiac arrest. She has shared her discoveries at meetings of the Neurocritical Care Society and Society of Hospital Medicine.

    The Neurocritical Care Society has honored her work. She also won the prestigious Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award, which recognizes clinical excellence, outstanding compassion in the delivery of care, and respect for patients, families, and health care colleagues.

    Dr. Kirsch received her medical degree from New York University. She completed her residency in neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and a fellowship in neurocritical care at Columbia University. She also completed the Columbia University narrative medicine certificate program and is board certified in neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  • Lironn Kraler, MD

    Lironn Kraler, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Kraler is a board-certified neurologist with subspecialty training in vascular neurology, and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Kraler is also the Associate Program Director for the Vascular Neurology Fellowship at Stanford.

    Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Dr. Kraler attended medical school at Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California where she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha National Honor Society. She completed her residency training at Stanford Hospital where she served as chief resident, followed by her Vascular Neurology fellowship training at Stanford. She then completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at Stanford University’s Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC) focused on addressing the high cost of care in US Hospitals.

    Her research interests include improving access and quality of population health and developing high-value innovations in care delivery that decrease the cost of care while improving the quality to patients. In addition, she has a strong interest in medical education. Dr. Kraler has received recognition for outstanding medical student teaching from the Department of Neurology.

  • Prashanth Krishnamohan, MD

    Prashanth Krishnamohan, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Krishnamohan is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist. He is a clinical assistant professor of neurology and neurological sciences and, by courtesy, of neurosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. In addition, he is Medical Director of the Neurosciences Service Line at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare and is Medical Director of its Stroke program.

    Dr. Krishnamohan excels in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological conditions. His clinical interests include the management of stroke, epilepsy, concussion, and coma. With every patient, his goal is to provide personalized care designed to optimize neurological function for the best possible clinical outcome and quality of life.

    He has published extensively on topics including innovations in stroke care quality management and measurement, rapid bedside evaluation of seizures in the ICU, and EEG metrics in comatose cardiac arrest patients. Articles by Dr. Krishnamohan have appeared in Neuroanesthesia and Neurocritical Care, Quality Management in Healthcare, Current Infectious Disease Reports, and other journals. He has presented his research findings at the annual meetings of the Neurocritical Care Society and American Academy of Neurology.
    He has authored chapters on post-concussive syndrome, stroke, and other conditions for the guidebook Ferri’s Clinical Advisor. In addition, he is a reviewer for the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, Neurohospitalist, and the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry.

    Dr. Krishnamohan has won recognition from Stanford Health Care, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School, the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, and PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research – the latter two his alma maters.

    Dr. Krishnamohan is a member of the Neurocritical Care Society, American Academy of Neurology, and American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. He volunteers as a community health educator with numerous organizations.

  • Kathryn Kvam

    Kathryn Kvam

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kvam's research focuses on 1) how to measure quality of care for patients with neurologic disease, 2) the value and impact of neurohospitalist models of care on patient outcomes and trainee education and 3) outcomes in rare diseases like autoimmune encephalitis.

  • Maarten Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Maarten Lansberg, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research involves the design and conduct of clinical trials to discover new treatments for patients who have suffered a stroke. These trials span treatment of acute stroke, stroke recovery, and stroke prevention. My research in acute stroke is primarily focused on the use of advanced neuroimaging methods (CT and MRI) to select patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies aimed at restoring blood flow to the brain in patients who have suffered a stroke.

  • Nicholas Wiessner Larsen, MD

    Nicholas Wiessner Larsen, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Larsen is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology, Division of Autonomic Disorders. He is a board-certified neurologist and a fellowship-trained specialist in neurophysiology and autonomics. He completed medical school at the University of Utah and neurology residency and fellowship at Stanford.

    In his clinical practice, Dr. Larsen focuses on disorders of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). His research interest is in the long-term autonomic complications of COVID-19. He is the principal investigator of a study looking at post-COVID postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Dr. Larsen’s research interests also include Global Health Neurology. Dr. Larsen helped establish the first stroke unit in Rwanda and is part of the American Academy of Neurology’s Refugees & Asylum Seekers Working Group.

    He has co-authored articles for publication in Clinical Autonomic Research, Autonomic Neuroscience, Nature Climate Change, and elsewhere. He is a recipient of the American Academy of Neurology Medical Student Prize for Excellence as well as a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

  • Amira Latif Hernandez

    Amira Latif Hernandez

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioAmira obtained her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the KU Leuven, Belgium, in summer 2017. During her doctoral studies, she used clinically valid tests of murine cognition, neuronal plasticity measures in hippocampal and cortical slices, brain lesion methods, pharmacological applications and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize the pathophysiology of novel mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). One of her most gratifying contributions was the development of a new electrophysiology tool to assess synaptopathies, and the establishment of long-term synaptic plasticity from prefrontal cortex of APP knock-in mice. In Autumn 2017, she moved to Dr. Longo’s lab at the Stanford School of Medicine, where she investigates signaling pathways involved in synaptic degeneration. During 3 years of postdoctoral work, she established a multi-electrode array system with eight independent recording chambers that allows high-throughput analyses of multiple long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity. She also gained experience in RNA-sequencing, molecular biochemistry, signaling mechanisms, target validation and drug development strategies for AD. In October 2020, Amira has been appointed as an Instructor in Neurodegenerative Disease Research, in the Longo lab, to help develop improved and more powerful approaches that will better reveal key synaptic mechanisms and candidate modules associated with neuroplasticity and affected in AD mouse models, by identifying activity-dependent gene expression signatures.

  • Scheherazade Le, MD

    Scheherazade Le, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurophysiology, Epilepsy/EEG, Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring,Tuberous Sclerosis, Autoimmune Epilepsy/Encephalitis, Autoimmune Encephalitis, Immune-Mediated Epilepsy

  • Kenneth Leung, MD, MS

    Kenneth Leung, MD, MS

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Leung is a board-certified neurologist who practices both comprehensive neurology and neuromuscular medicine. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology within the Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Leung has a particular interest in the diagnosis and management of a broad range of disorders affecting muscle and nerves, including motor neuron disease, neuropathy, neuromuscular junction disorders, and myopathy. He also is an avid clinician educator who develops course work, is involved in education research, and teaches medical students and neurology residents/fellows. He currently serves as Director of the Neurology Clerkship for medical students within the Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley where he was awarded the 2011 Departmental Citation Award for Excellence in Research in Immunology. In 2016 he earned his medical degree and concurrent master’s degree in applied anatomy from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. He then completed his internal medicine internship at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center and neurology residency at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. During this time, he developed a passion for neurology education and served on graduate medical education committees for curricular development, trainee well-being and resilience, and quality improvement. For his work in medical education, he was selected as a Harvard Macy Institute Scholar in 2018 and was awarded the 2020 Institute for Medical Education House Staff Excellence in Teaching Award. He was also inducted as a house staff in the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society. He then went on to complete a neuromuscular medicine fellowship at Stanford prior to joining as faculty.-

  • Yi Li, MD, PhD

    Yi Li, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Li is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She specializes in epilepsy care and research. She has dedicated her career to advancing our understanding of the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of epilepsy. In addition to her MD degree, she holds a PhD degree in neurology and neuroscience. She undertook PhD training to better understand epileptogenesis and to identify potential new treatments for refractory epilepsy patients. She has received the Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate, which helped advance her knowledge of how genomic data can enhance patient management in clinical practice.

    She has published numerous articles on a wide range of epilepsy-related topics. Among her honors, Dr. Li has earned recognition from the American Epilepsy Society and International League Against Epilepsy. She also won a safety and quality awards scholarship from the American Academy of Neurology. She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society.

  • Kathie S Lin

    Kathie S Lin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Lin practices both Neuromuscular Medicine and Comprehensive Neurology in Emeryville and Palo Alto. She has a particular interest in the diagnosis and management of neuromuscular disease including neuromuscular junction disorders, motor neuron disease, and focal neuropathy. Additionally, she is interested in medical education and developing a practical framework for teaching neurology and neurophysiology to medical students and neurology residents.

    She earned her medical degree at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine where was awarded a Dean's Scholarship and the Dr. Tryphena Humphrey Student Award in Neurology. She completed neurology residency at the Harvard Neurology Program at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston where she served as an administrative chief resident in her final year and was awarded the Michael Ronthal Resident Teaching Award. She then went on to complete her neuromuscular medicine fellowship at Stanford.

  • Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery
    On Partial Leave from 05/01/2024 To 07/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interests include Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease and the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders. Laboratory interests encompass the elucidation of signaling mechanisms relevant to neurodegenerative disorders and the development of novel small molecule approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative and other neurological disorders.

  • Jaime Lopez, MD

    Jaime Lopez, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical interests are in the areas of Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IOM), clinical neurophysiology, electromyopgraphy and in the use of botulinum toxins in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Our IOM group’s research is in the development of new and innovative techniques for monitoring the nervous system during surgical and endovascular procedures and how these alter surgical management and patient outcomes. I am also active in formulating national IOM practice guidelines.

  • William J Marks, Jr., MD, MS-HCM

    William J Marks, Jr., MD, MS-HCM

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Marks is the Chief Medical Officer and Co-Founder of Nexus NeuroTech, dedicated to advancing breakthrough technologies for brain disorders.

    Dr. Marks received an Honors Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Marquette University and his Medical Degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed his neurology residency and fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Marks also holds a Master of Science in Health Care Management degree from the Harvard School of Public Health.

    Dr. Marks is Board Certified in Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology. Prior to joining the Stanford Faculty, he served as Professor of Neurology at UCSF. His clinical and research interests include movement disorders, epilepsy, neuromodulation, health technology, and health care policy.

    Dr. Marks previously served as Head of Clinical Science at Verily Life Sciences, formerly Google Life Sciences, and now is an Advisor in Neurology for Verily.

  • Jamie McDonald, MD, MS

    Jamie McDonald, MD, MS

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. McDonald is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases, including neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody disease (MOGAD). Dr. McDonald also provides comprehensive care to general neurology patients.

    Dr. McDonald completed her internship and adult neurology residency at the University of Utah. She has a long-standing interest in multiple sclerosis care and went on to complete a two-year clinical MS/neuroimmunology fellowship at Stanford Health Care Multiple Sclerosis Center. Dr. McDonald received the National MS Society’s Sylvia Lawry Physician Fellowship, including formalized training in conducting clinical trials. As part of her fellowship, she completed a master’s degree in epidemiology and clinical research.

  • Steven Lee Mcintire

    Steven Lee Mcintire

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. McIntire earned his MD from Harvard Medical School and his PhD in Neuroscience from Harvard University, where he was awarded a Frank Knox Memorial Fellowship and Carl Walter Fellowship. He then completed Neurology residency training at UCSF. He is board certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. He has been named a Robert Ebert Clinical Scholar and Culpepper Medical Science Scholar. Dr. McIntire has published extensively in the fields of molecular neurobiology and neurogenetics.

    Dr. McIntire’s interests are in general/comprehensive neurology. He is also interested in medical education and the training of medical students and neurology residents.

  • Kimford Meador, MD

    Kimford Meador, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology)

    BioDr. Meador is a Professor of Neurology and Neurosciences at Stanford University, and Clinical Director, Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. Dr. Meador graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Applied Biology (with high honor) and received his MD from the Medical College of Georgia. After an internship at the University of Virginia and service as an officer in the Public Health Corps, he completed a residency in Neurology at the Medical College of Georgia and a fellowship in Behavioral Neurology at the University of Florida. Dr. Meador joined the faculty at the Medical College of Georgia (1984-2002) where he became the Charbonnier Professor of Neurology. He was the Chair of Neurology at Georgetown University (2002-2004), the Melvin Greer Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience at the University of Florida (2004-2008) where he served as Director of Epilepsy Program and Director of the Clinical Alzheimer Research Program, and Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics at Emory University (2008-2013) where he served as Director of Epilepsy and of Clinical Neurocience Research. He joined the faculty of Stanford University in 2013. Dr. Meador has authored over 400 peer-reviewed publications. His research interests include: cognitive mechanisms (e.g., memory and attention); cerebral lateralization; pharmacology and physiology of cognition; mechanisms of perception, consciousness and memory; EEG; epilepsy; epilepsy and pregnancy; preoperative evaluation for epilepsy surgery; intracarotid amobarbital procedure (i.e., Wada test); functional imaging; therapeutic drug trials; neurodevelopmental effects of antiepileptic drugs; psychoimmunology; behavioral disorders (e.g., aphasia, neglect, dementia); and neuropsychiatric disorders. Dr. Meador has served as the PI for a long running NIH multicenter study of pregnancy outcomes in women with epilepsy and their children. Dr. Meador has served on the editorial boards for Clinical Neurophysiology, Epilepsy and Behavior, Epilepsy Currents, Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurology, Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology, and Epilepsy.com. His honors include Resident Teaching Award Medical College of Georgia; Outstanding Young Faculty Award in Clinical Sciences Medical College of Georgia; Distinguished Faculty Award for Clinical Research Medical College of Georgia Lawrence C. McHenry History Award American Academy of Neurology; Dreifuss Abstract Award American Epilepsy Society; Fellow of the American Neurological Association; Diplomat of American Neurologic Association; past Chair of the Section of Behavioral Neurology of American Academy of Neurology; past President of Society for Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology; past President of the Society for Behavioral & Cognitive Neurology; past President of the Southern EEG & Epilepsy Society; ranking in the top 10 experts in epilepsy worldwide by Expertscape; Distinguished Alumnus Award for Professional Achievement, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University 2015; American Epilepsy Society Clinical Research Award; and named award by the American Epilepsy Society: “Kimford J. Meador Research in Women with Epilepsy Award,” and ranked in the top 500 neuroscientist in the world and top 300 in USA by Research.com in 2022.

  • Mitchell Miglis, MD

    Mitchell Miglis, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Sleep Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProdromal markers of neurodegeneration in REM sleep behavior disorder
    Autonomic dysfunction in Long-COVID
    Postural tachycardia syndrome

  • Rebecca Kate Miller-Kuhlmann

    Rebecca Kate Miller-Kuhlmann

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioRebecca Miller-Kuhlmann, MD is board certified in Neurology and in Electrodiagnostic Medicine and practices as a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences at Stanford University. She earned her MD from UCSF School of Medicine and completed residency and fellowship training at Stanford University. Her fellowship training in Comprehensive Clinical Neurology focused on movement disorders, memory/cognitive disorders neuromuscular medicine/EMG/NCS studies, and therapeutic applications of botulinum toxin with supplementary training in headache, epilepsy and neuroimmunology. Her clinical focus is diagnosis and treatment of neurologic conditions with commitment to maintaining a wide-breadth of knowledge in order to best treat complex patients with multiple neurologic issues.

    Academically, Dr Miller-Kuhlmann is passionate about medical education and physician wellbeing. Prior to her career in medicine, Dr Miller-Kuhlmann was a public school teacher in Oakland, CA. She completed the UCSF health professions education pathway with a dean's award for research in medical student reflection during medical school. During residency she served as education chief resident and earned an honors certificate in medical education at Stanford, She continues to enjoy working with medical students and residents in the clinic as well as the classroom. She directs the Science of Medicine course which covers physiology and pathology of each organ system for first and second year medical students, and as of 2023 has had the priviledge to serve as the Assistant Dean for Preclerkship Education. At the residency level, she serves as the associate-director for a novel communication coaching program within the Stanford Neurology Residency.

    Dr. Miller-Kuhlmann is the Wellbeing Director for the Department of Neurology and interested in multi-level strategies for promotion of professional fulfillment and mitigation of physician burnout. Nationally, she was an inaugural graduate of the American Academy of Neurology's Live Well Lead Well Leadership programs, serves on the AAN physician wellness subcommittee, and has had the opportunity to speak on physician wellbeing at the AAN annual meeting. Locally, she co-developed a wellbeing program for neurology residents and fellows, steers the neurology department wellness committee, and through close partnership with department quality improvement leaders serves on projects to improve physician wellbeing through a focus on system supports and efficiencies. To this end, she is also a graduate of the Stanford Clinical Effectiveness Leadership Program which develops skills in quality improvement and change management. She also co-developed and annually teaches a project-based novel quality improvement curriculum for residents with an eye toward empowering and supporting trainees in becoming agents of change within the system.

  • Martha Morrell, MD

    Martha Morrell, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Morrell is a Clinical Professor of Neurology at Stanford University since July 2004. Before joining NeuroPace, she was the Caitlin Tynan Doyle Professor of Clinical Neurology at Columbia University and Director of the Columbia Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. Previously she was on the faculty of the Stanford University School of Medicine where she served as Director of the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. A graduate of Stanford Medical School, she completed residency training in Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania, as well as fellowship training in EEG and epilepsy.

    Dr. Morrell has been actively involved in helping to bring new medical and device therapies to patients with epilepsy. Since 2004, she has been Chief Medical Officer at NeuroPace, a company that developed a responsive neurostimulator for treatment of medically uncontrolled partial seizures. She has authored or coauthored more than 150 publications.

    Service to professional societies includes member of the Board of Directors of the American Epilepsy Society, member and Chair of the Board of the Epilepsy Foundation, member of the Council of the American Neurological Association and Chair of the Epilepsy Section of the American Academy of Neurology. She is an elected Ambassador for Epilepsy of the International League Against Epilepsy and received the American Epilepsy Society’s 2007 Service Award for outstanding leadership and service. She is the current President of the American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics.

  • Leon S. Moskatel, MD

    Leon S. Moskatel, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Moskatel is internist with fellowship training in headache medicine and board certification in internal medicine. He is a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Neurology, Division of Headache.

    His practice at the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of all forms of headache. Patients come to him seeking relief from migraine, cluster, and tension headaches.

    Dr. Moskatel teaches headache medicine to medical students and supervises resident physicians in the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic.

    He conducts research into migraine and diet, medication overuse headache, and long-lasting headache after COVID-19. He has written articles on these and other topics. They have appeared in peer-reviewed journals such as Headache, Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports, Annals of Headache Medicine, and Pain Medicine.

    Dr. Moskatel has reviewed the content of articles written by other doctors for the journals Headache and Pain Medicine. The publication Annals of Internal Medicine awarded him a letter of commendation as outstanding reviewer.

    He has co-authored textbook chapters on migraine and diet and on headache treatments. He has presented his research discoveries to his peers at meetings of the World Headache Society and other organizations.

    Dr. Moskatel volunteers his time to serve both professional and community organizations. He speaks English and Hebrew fluently and reads French.

  • Sandeepa Mullady, MD

    Sandeepa Mullady, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Mullady is a board-certified neurologist providing care at Stanford Health Care’s Memory Disorders Center. She completed a memory and aging fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Mullady specializes in memory disorders and aging. She has a particular interest in caring for homeless patients with neurological conditions.

    She is passionate about educating both patients and colleagues. She seeks to improve health literacy in underserved communities. She has mentored students, organized seminars and conferences, and lectured about rare neurological cases and issues related to social justice.

    Dr. Mullady excels in community outreach, health advocacy, and leadership. She has organized and directed outreach programs at women’s shelters, clinics for the homeless, and an alcohol and drug rehabilitation center. She has also developed programs to encourage childhood reading at home and to educate underserved communities about neurodegenerative disorders.

    She has published peer-reviewed articles in Frontiers of Neurology that report her research on the effects of homelessness on neurocognitive health. She has also presented posters at regional and national conferences on the topics of interprofessional health coaching and the effects of homelessness on mental function.

  • Seema Nagpal, MD

    Seema Nagpal, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm a board certified neuro-oncologist who treats both primary brain tumors as well as metastatic disease to the brain and nervous system. My research concentrates on clinical trials for patients with late-stage central nervous system cancer. I have a special interest in leptomeningeal disease, a devastating complication of lung and breast cancers. I collaborate with Stanford scientists to detect this disease earlier, and with our breast and lung oncologists to improve outcomes for patients.

  • Viet Nguyen, MD

    Viet Nguyen, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Viet Nguyen is a neurophysiologist and Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology at Stanford School of Medicine. His practice focuses on Intraoperative Neurophysiologic Monitoring (IONM).

    Dr. Nguyen was fellowship-trained at Stanford in Clinical Neurophysiology, with an emphasis in IONM.

    The IONM service uses somatosensory and motor evoked potentials (SSEP, MEP), electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) to help minimize risk in procedures that involve the nervous system. These include surgeries and endovascular procedures for cerebral aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), carotid stenosis, brain and spinal tumors, spinal deformities like scoliosis and spinal stenosis, peripheral nerve injury and tumors, aortic aneurysms, trigeminal neuralgia, facial dystonia, and others.

    He has published, presented research, and lectured at national and international meetings on IONM topics, and is active in multiple professional organizations in the field, including the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society, Society of Clinical Neurologists, and American Academy of Neurology.

  • Esther H. Nie

    Esther H. Nie

    Clinical Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioEsther Nie MD, PhD is currently a Neuroimmunology Fellow with a special focus on neuroimmuno-oncology. She completed Adult Neurology Residency at Stanford. Dr. Nie's clinical interests include neurological presentations of CAR-T neurotoxicity, BITE therapies, and CNS/PNS demyelinating diseases. Her research interests include: microglial response in CAR-T therapy, steroid effects on the CAR-T/neurological outcomes, and enhancing repair after brain injury.

  • Oyindamola Ikepo Ogunlaja

    Oyindamola Ikepo Ogunlaja

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Ogunlaja is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist. She provides patient care in the Stanford Headache Clinic. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Neurology, Headache Division.

    Her specialized skills include Botox therapy for chronic migraine, trigger point injection procedures, and occipital nerve blocks.

    Her prior experience includes serving as a consultant neurologist at King’s College Hospital in London.

    Dr. Ogunlaja was a clinical research fellow in the Headache Group at King’s College. She was a physician member of the Dementia Consensus Panel of the Health and Aging in Africa Study.

    She also conducted research at the Unit of Health-Care Epidemiology in the University of Oxford’s Department of Public Health. She investigated the epidemiology of patients hospitalized for sickle cell disease in England.

    Dr. Ogunlaja has published in peer-reviewed journals including Headache and Current Pain and Headache Reports. She has presented her research findings to her peers at the International Headache Conference.

    She is a member of the American Headache Society.

  • Donald M. Olson

    Donald M. Olson

    Associate Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEpilepsy in children and adolescents. Particular interest in clinical neurophysiology (EEG and video EEG), differential diagnosis of seizures in children, and selection of patients who will benefit from epilepsy surger.

  • Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Josef Parvizi, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Parvizi completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic, neurology training at Harvard, and subspecialty training in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy at UCLA before joining the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford in 2007. Dr. Parvizi directs the Stanford Program for Medication Resistant Epilepsies and specializes in surgical treatments of intractable focal epilepsies. Dr. Parvizi is the principal investigator in the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience, where he leads a team of investigators to study the human brain. http://med.stanford.edu/parvizi-lab.html.

  • Addie Peretz

    Addie Peretz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Peretz's research interests include understanding the biological underpinnings of migraine and chronic daily headaches. She also participates in clinical trials of new headache treatments.

  • Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor of Neurology and the Neurological Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research addresses one of the most devastating and poorly treated symptoms that can develop in people with Parkinson's disease - Dementia. We use multi-modal neuroimaging along with genetic and biological markers to understand the different underlying causes of dementia and to understand why dementia develops more quickly in some patients, but not others.

  • David Prince

    David Prince

    Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor of Neurology and the Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperiments examine
    1)intrinsic properties of neuronal membranes; actions of neurotransmitters that regulate neocortical and thalamic excitability
    2) chronic epileptogenesis following cortical injury; changes in intracortical connectivity and receptors;
    3) effects of early injury and activity on cortical development/maldevelopment Electrophysiological, anatomical and pharmacological techniques employed.
    4. prophylaxis of postraumatic epilepsy
    5. Neocortical interneuronal function/modulation

  • Lindsey Rasmussen

    Lindsey Rasmussen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests reside in the field of Neurocritical Care Medicine. My research focus has included inflammation following traumatic brain injury, outcome prediction after cardiac arrest, and neuro-monitoring in the pediatric intensive care setting. These interests are integrated clinically to focus on the merging of specialized neurologic monitoring and care with prognostic efforts in critically ill patients.

  • Babak Razavi, MD, PhD

    Babak Razavi, MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Razavi's clinical interests are in medically refractory epilepsies and using high density EEG (electroencephalogram) for better localization of seizure foci. His research areas include using advanced digital signal processing and engineering techniques for analyzing EEG and using seizures as a model for understanding consciousness.

    Dr. Razavi is the Founder and Director of DEL - Distributed EEG Lab. DEL's vision is to make EEG easy as 1, 2, 3. We turn complexity into simplicity. We are distributed in time and space. DEL was founded in the spirit of cloud computing, networking, and the notion that research in collaboration is more exciting and fruitful than in isolation. Everyone contributes - no matter how small; everyone wins - no matter how big. It was inspired by the mentorship of Dr. Kimford Meador and Dr. Robert Fisher. All you need is access to a computer and the internet.

    DEL is the ideal collaborative environment for students (undergraduate and graduate) and faculty who would like to: (1) apply ready-to-use advanced analytical techniques to test specific hypotheses in cognition, neuroscience and epilepsy, and (2) develop and test new algorithms for analyzing EEG and other biological signals.

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsReimer Lab interests

    A primary interest of our lab is to understand how nerve cells make and recycle neurotransmitters, the small molecules that they use to communicate with each other. In better defining these processes we hope to achieve our long-term goal of identifying novel sites for treatment of diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson Disease. In our studies on neurotransmitter metabolism we have focused our efforts on transporters, a functional class of proteins that move neurotransmitters and other small molecules across membranes in cells. Transporters have many characteristics that make them excellent pharmacological targets, and not surprisingly some of the most effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders are directed at transporters. We are specifically focusing on two groups of transporters – vesicular neurotransmitter transporters that package neurotransmitters into vesicles for release, and glutamine transporters that shuttle glutamine, a precursor for two major neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, to neurons from glia, the supporting cells that surround them. We are pursuing these goals through molecular and biochemical studies, and, in collaboration with the Huguenard and Prince labs, through physiological and biosensor based imaging studies to better understand how pharmacological targeting of these molecules will influence neurological disorders.

    A second interest of our lab is to define mechanism underlying the pathology of lysosomal storage disorders. Lysosomes are membrane bound acidic intracellular organelles filled with hydrolytic enzymes that normally function as recycling centers within cells by breaking down damaged cellular macromolecules. Several degenerative diseases designated as lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are associated with the accumulation of material within lysosomes. Tay-Sachs disease, Neimann-Pick disease and Gaucher disease are some of the more common LSDs. For reasons that remain incompletely understood, these diseases often affect the nervous system out of proportion to other organs. As a model for LSDs we are studying the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders. These diseases are the result of a defect in transport of sialic acid across lysosomal membranes and are associated with mutations in the gene encoding the sialic acid transporter sialin. We are using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches to better define the normal function of sialin and to determine how loss of sialin function leads to neurodevelopmental defects and neurodegeneration associated with the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders.

  • Eric Rider, MD

    Eric Rider, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Rider is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neuromuscular neurologist with the Neuromuscular Program at the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center. He is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Rider specializes in treating neuromuscular disease, including motor neuron disease, disorders of the neuromuscular junction, peripheral and focal neuropathies, as well as other acquired or genetic conditions that cause muscular deterioration, muscle weakness, and nerve damage. He practices both Comprehensive Neurology and Neuromuscular Medicine in Palo Alto and Emeryville.

    Dr. Rider earned his medical degree at the University of California, San Francisco and completed residency at Stanford. He also completed fellowship training in Neuromuscular Medicine at UCSF. He has a passion for teaching neurology to students and patients. He was awarded the Fishers and Dunn teaching award for medical student teaching as a resident.
    Dr. Rider is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

  • Lucia Angelica Rivera Lara, MD, MPH

    Lucia Angelica Rivera Lara, MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Rivera-Lara is a neurocritical care fellowship-trained neurologist and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    As a member of the neurocritical care team, Dr. Rivera-Lara expertise focuses on the prompt, careful assessment and treatment of patients who suffer stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, and seizures.

    In her research, Dr. Rivera-Lara has studied innovations to control blood flow and relieve intracranial pressure in patients with hemorrhage. Her findings have been published in journals including Critical Care Medicine, Neurocritical Care, Stroke, Seizure, the Journal of Neurosurgery and Anesthesiology, JAMA, and presented at the International Stroke Conference, the Critical Care Conference, and at meetings of the American Academy of Neurology and Neurocritical Care Society.

    She has co-authored book chapters on stroke management, neurocritical patient monitoring, antiepileptic drug therapies, brain injury after cardiac arrest, and other topics. In addition, she has served as an editorial reviewer for publications including Neurology, Critical Care Medicine, the Journal of Critical Care, Neurocritical Care and Frontiers of Neurology.

    Dr. Rivera-Lara earned a Clinical Reaserch Fellowship Training award from the American Academy of Neurology and American Brain Foundation. She was nominated for the Best Consulting Physician Award, one of only a few clinical honors bestowed annually on physicians and care teams by Johns Hopkins Medicine.

    She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Society of Critical Care Medicine, and Neurocritical Care Society.

    In conjunction with the Pan-American Health Organization and World Health Organization, Dr. Rivera-Lara has volunteered her time and expertise to help develop neurocritical care recommendations for patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome associated with Zika virus in the Dominican Republic. She also has served as a visiting professor in the Department of Neurology at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City and Ignacio Morones Prieto Hospital in San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

  • Zachary T. Roberts, MD

    Zachary T. Roberts, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Zach Roberts is a board-certified neurologist and epileptologist with Stanford Health Care’s Comprehensive Neurology Program. He is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences. He completed two years of epilepsy fellowship training at New York University Langone Health where he gained extensive experience using neuromodulatory devices and managing epilepsy that is difficult to treat. Prior to this fellowship, he completed his neurology residency at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Dr. Roberts specializes in caring for patients with epilepsy. He creates personalized, comprehensive care plans tailored to each patient’s unique needs. He is skilled in the use of neuromodulatory devices for treating epilepsy, including vagal nerve stimulation (VNS), responsive neurostimulation (RNS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). His additional clinical interests include the interpretation of electroencephalography (EEG) studies as well as the treatment of sleep disorders.

    Dr. Roberts has had a passion for medical education throughout his training as a doctor. He has taught and created content related to neurology and epilepsy for medical students, residents, fellows, and patients. He has designed a simulation-based learning module for the treatment of prolonged seizures and lectured on neurology for a physician assistant program in Pennsylvania. He is dedicated to advancing the knowledge of both his peers and patients.

    His research interests include quality improvement as well as using technology to aid health care delivery—both in treating epilepsy and in the field of neurology. Dr. Roberts’ work has been featured on posters presented at national and international conferences. He has also published a peer-reviewed journal article on doctors’ experiences with teleneurology in Telemedicine and e-Health.

    Dr. Roberts is an active member of the American Academy of Neurology, the American Medical Association, and the American Epilepsy Society.

  • Zahra Sadat-Hossieny, MD

    Zahra Sadat-Hossieny, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioZahra Sadat-Hossieny, MD, is a board-certified neurologist who completed her fellowship in clinical epilepsy at Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics. She finished her residency in neurology at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. She obtained her medical degree and a certificate in global health from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

    She has extensive experience treating patients with epilepsy and currently provides care through the Comprehensive Epilepsy and Comprehensive Neurology Programs at Stanford Health Care. In addition to her clinical responsibilities, Dr. Sadat-Hossieny also teaches future generations of clinicians as an assistant professor at Stanford School of Medicine in the Department of Neurology, Epilepsy, and Comprehensive Neurology.

    Dr. Sadat-Hossieny has authored several peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. She has presented her research orally and through posters at various conferences. During her fellowship at Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics, she used advanced diagnostic techniques including video-EEG monitoring, computerized brainwave mapping, diagnostic imaging, neuropsychiatric testing, and functional mapping to accurately diagnose epilepsy and conditions imitating epilepsy. She also gained expertise in the most advanced forms of epilepsy treatment including neuromodulation, epilepsy surgery and medications specific to epilepsy. Her research focused on the cognitive effects of anti-seizure medications on patients with epilepsy and their children. She has also published on the importance of nutrient supplementation on cognition in patients taking anti-seizure medications. Her collaborations include projects that assess and improve patients’ understanding of their own seizure types.

  • Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Sarada Sakamuri specializes in neuromuscular medicine. Her interests are peripheral nerve injury, neuromuscular ultrasound, EMG/NCS, and neurogenetic disorders. Her other passion is graduate medical education.

    She graduated from Rutgers University with Phi Beta Kappa distinction and a degree in psychology. She attended Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, NJ, where she led multiple community service and medical education activities and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha and Gold Humanism Honor Societies. She moved to the Bay Area to pursue neurology residency at Stanford, where she later served as chief resident. She then completed two years of fellowship in EMG/Clinical Neurophysiology and Neuromuscular Medicine and research training at Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center.

    Dr. Sakamuri's passion is neuromuscular medicine, with a focus on peripheral nerve traumas and disorders. She is Co-Director of the Center for Peripheral Nerve Surgery along with neurosurgeon Dr. Thomas J. Wilson. She performs advanced evaluations of peripheral nerve conditions by integrating nerve and muscle ultrasound and neurophysiologic testing (EMG/NCS) at the bedside. She has advanced training in nerve and muscle ultrasound, and sits on the Neuromuscular Ultrasound Committee of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM).

    She is board-certified in Neurology and in Neuromuscular disorders by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). She is certified in EMG/NCS by the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (ABEM), and holds a Certificate of Added Qualification in Neuromuscular Ultrasound.

    Dr. Sakamuri's other passion is graduate medical education. She is the Program Director of the Stanford Neuromuscular Medicine Fellowship and Associate Director of the Clinical Neurophysiology/EMG Fellowship, with a total of five ACGME-accredited positions filled by extremely bright and talented fellows. She supervises a weekly neurology resident continuity clinic and enjoys teaching medical students and neurology and physiatry residents and fellows. She been awarded the Lysia S. Forno Award for outstanding contributions to resident teaching.

  • Jacinda Sampson

    Jacinda Sampson

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Jacinda Sampson received her MD and a PhD in biochemistry from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed her neurology residency and neurogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. She served at Columbia University Medical Center prior to joining Stanford University Medical Center in 2015. Her areas of interest include myotonic dystrophies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and neurogenetic disorders such as neurofibromatosis, hereditary spastic paraparesis, spinocerebellar ataxia, among others. She is interested in clinical trials for treatment of neurogenetic disorders, and in the clinical application of next-generation genomic sequencing to genetic testing.

  • Niyatee Samudra, MD

    Niyatee Samudra, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Samudra is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She specializes in the care of patients with memory disorders and epilepsy. She has completed fellowship training in behavioral neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, as well as in epilepsy and clinical neurophysiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Samudra is board-certified in neurology and in epilepsy.

    Her research interests include clinical trials in memory disorders and epilepsy; early neurophysiological markers of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders; neuropsychiatric symptoms in neurodegenerative disorders; and the cognitive and neuropsychiatric consequences of epilepsy. She is interested in improving neurologic care for underserved populations.

    Dr. Samudra has published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease; Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports; Journal of the Neurological Sciences; Seizure; and Epilepsy and Behavior, among others. She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

  • Calvin Santiago

    Calvin Santiago

    Clinical Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Santiago is Board-certified as a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada, specializing in Neurology. He completed his Adult Neurology residency at the University of Toronto and is now a Clinical Instructor in the Division of Comprehensive Neurology at Stanford University. He provides comprehensive neurological care to patients with a broad range of neurological conditions. His academic interests focus on improving access to neurological care, such as reducing wait times and stream-lining referrals so that patients are directed to the most appropriate care provider.