School of Medicine


Showing 601-700 of 806 Results

  • William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:
    1. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.
    2. To investigate the role of innate immune inflammation in osteoarthritis.
    3. To develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics

  • Eunice Rodriguez

    Eunice Rodriguez

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent program of teaching and research integrates: 1) health disparities and social epidemiology, within the broader area of public health, and 2) program evaluation, as a synthesis of theory and methods applied to the evaluation of health and social programs.

  • Samuel Rodriguez, MD

    Samuel Rodriguez, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Sam Rodriguez is a native of New Jersey and practicing Pediatric Anesthesiologist at Stanford Children's Hospital. He is best known for being the husband of the Stanford Cardiologist Dr. Fatima Rodriguez. Sam was a member of the self proclaimed greatest Anesthesia Residency Class in history (MGH 2012). He is a founder and co-director of the Stanford CHARIOT Program which creates and studies innovative approaches to treating pediatric pain and stress through technology. The CHARIOT Program has positively impacted thousands of children around the world and has grown to include emerging technologies like virtual reality, augmented reality, and interactive video games. Dr. Rodriguez is also highly involved in medical humanities education at Stanford Medical School and teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels on how studying art can make better physicians.

  • Stephan Rogalla, M.D. PhD

    Stephan Rogalla, M.D. PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research interest of myself and my lab are in the field of early cancer detection using targeted molecular spies to highlight (pre)cancerous lesions. We as well aim to improve precision medicine in autoimmune disorders like inflammatory bowel disease and oncology.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Intereststhe overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    BioLisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas’ research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement and the Stanford Cancer Institute Community Outreach and Engagement Program. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Jessica Rose

    Jessica Rose

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rose's research investigates neuromuscular mechanisms underlying cerebral palsy (CP) early brain and motor development in preterm children and . Research examines neonatal microstructural brain development on DTI and physiological correlates of motor function in preterm children. Dr. Rose served on the NIH Taskforce on Childhood Motor Disorders, the AACPDM Research Committee and Steering Committee to develop CDE for CP neuroimaging diagnostics, and serves on the Board of Directors of SBMT.

  • Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Stanford University Endowed Professor for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease

    BioI am a pediatric gastroenterologist and physician scientist, who has been devoted to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) research since beginning medical training over 20 years ago. I am also Director of the Stanford Center for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease. I have expertise crossing mucosal immunology and epithelial biology, formal training and experience in clinical and translational investigation with human biospecimens, and direct insight regarding the important clinical challenges caring for children with complicated IBD. My translational research program focuses on how the immune system regulates epithelial function in chronic intestinal inflammation as it relates to IBD. My clinical research program has focused on optimization of anti-TNF therapy in pediatric IBD, and in particular acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC). My laboratory has demonstrated a protective role for IL33, a cytokine that induces type 2 cytokines from T cells an innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), in acute oxazolone colitis through preservation of epithelial goblet cells and barrier function. In line with this finding, we have also shown in a large prospective patient cohort that mucosal expression of type 2 and type 17 immune response genes distinguishes ulcerative colitis (UC) from colon-only Crohn’s disease, and that type 2 gene expression is associated with superior clinical outcome in pediatric UC. We have now developed an organoid-immune cell in vitro culture system to demonstrate the ILC2-dependent mechanism through which IL33 induces goblet cell differentiation in the intestinal epithelium. I led the multicenter study Anti-TNF for Refractory Colitis in Hospitalized Children (ARCH) Study, which aims to establish determinants of anti-TNF response in pediatric ASUC and currently Co-Chair the Crohn's & Colitis Foundations Cohort for Pediatric Translational and Clinical Research in IBD (CAPTURE IBD) and PRO-KIIDS Pediatric IBD clinical research network.

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Bernard Roth

    Bernard Roth

    Rodney H. Adams Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioRoth is one of the founders of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the d.school) and is active in its development: currently, he serves as Academic Director. His design interests include organizing and presenting workshops on creativity, group interactions, and the problem solving process. Formerly he researched the kinematics, dynamics, control, and design of computer controlled mechanical devices. In kinematics, he studied the mathematical theory of rigid body motions and its application to the design of machines.

  • Stephen J. Roth

    Stephen J. Roth

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRandomized Therapeutic Trials in Pediatric Heart Disease, NIH/U01 GrantNo. HL68285 2001-2006.
    Heparin and the Reduction of Thrombosis (HART) Study. Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.
    A Pilot Trial fo B-type Natriuretic Peptide for Promotion of Urine Output in Diuretic-Resistant Infants Following Cardiovascular Surgery.Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.

  • Brian Rutt

    Brian Rutt

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests center on MRI research, including high-field and high-resolution MRI technology development as well as applications of advanced MRI techniques to studying the brain, cardiovascular system and cancer.

  • maura ruzhnikov

    maura ruzhnikov

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics - Medical Genetics

    BioChild neurologist and medical geneticist focusing on the diagnosis and management of rare neurologic disorders. Specific interests are in genetic epilepsy syndromes, childhood neurodegenerative and neurometabolic diseases and undiagnosed suspected genetic conditions.

  • Debra Safer

    Debra Safer

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include the nature and treatment of eating disorders
    (particularly bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder), the development and treatment of obesity, and the development and treatment of problematic eating patterns in patients following bariatric surgery.

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Elaine and John Chambers Professor of Pediatric Cancer and Professor of Genetics
    On Partial Leave from 05/30/2022 To 08/28/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Manish Saggar

    Manish Saggar

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe overarching goal of my research is to develop reliable computational methods that will allow for characterizing and modeling temporal dynamics of brain activity, without averaging data in either space or time. I firmly believe that the spatiotemporal richness in brain activity might hold the key to finding the person- and disorder-centric biomarkers. I am currently developing methods to model the temporal dynamics of brain activity in individuals with fragile X syndrome and healthy controls.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Lee Sanders

    Lee Sanders

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI conduct interdisciplinary research to understand child and parent health literacy as potentially modifiable determinants of child health disparities. I am principal investigator on an multi-site, randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a low-literacy, early-childhood intervention designed to prevent obesity in the first two years of life. The aim of my current scholarship is to apply the health-literacy model to attenuate disparities for children with chronic illness.

  • Meera N. Sankar

    Meera N. Sankar

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPDA in premature infants
    Transcutaneous bilirubin use in the NICU Setting

  • Peter L. Santa Maria, MBBS, PhD

    Peter L. Santa Maria, MBBS, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study chronic suppurative otitis media, a chronic biofilm infection of the middle ear predominantly involving pseudomonas and staph aureus. We are investigating mechanisms of sensory hearing loss, host microbe interactions and trialling novel therapeutics.

    Our work in tympanic membrane regeneration has entered clinical trials.

    Novel treatments for wound healing in intra oral wounds with potential applications to prevent post tonsillectomy wound healing and oral mucositis.

  • Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research encompasses two main areas: 1) Using next-generation RNA, whole genome, and exome sequencing, we are investigating the genetic alterations involved in skin cancer progression, response to therapy, and other clinical outcomes and 2) We are developing and implementing genome-wide genetic risk prediction assessments for skin cancer into clinical use and studying the impact of this information on patient care.

  • Peter Sarnow

    Peter Sarnow

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies virus-host interactions with an emphasis microRNA-mediated gene regulation and on translational control. The mechanism by which a liver-specific microRNA regulates hepatitis C virus genome replication is under intense scrutiny. In addition, the mechanism of internal ribosome entry in certain cellular and viral mRNAs and its biological role in growth and development is being investigated.

  • Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Sarnquist focuses on applied teaching and research on the development, implementation and evaluation of interventions to decrease gender-based violence and prevent HIV infection, especially among adolescents and children. She is particularly interested in rights-based approaches that tackle the complex interplay of factors that lead to poor health for many children and families. All of her work is applied, with direct links health practice and policy, and usually performed in conjunction with non-governmental organization and government partners. She works both globally and in the U.S., with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Nazish Sayed MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Sayed Laboratory is focused on the development of novel technologies that drive innovation in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug testing in vascular biology. The lab conducts translational research in vascular biology and aims to understand the role of the vasculature in the development of cardiac diseases, including those due to inherited genetic variants or environmental insults such as type 2 diabetes or hypertension. The lab employs the human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to generate patient-specific vascular cells (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells) as an alternative to animal models providing a human tissue surrogate for research that is scalable and sustainable. By employing this unique platform, the lab also investigates the role of chemotherapeutic agents (anti-cancer drugs) on the vasculature. Dr. Sayed’s lab has also established an endothelial regeneration program, where they leverage the innate immune system to regenerate endothelial cells from human fibroblasts.

    Work from the lab has led to seminal discoveries in the areas of 1) Nitric oxide (NO) biology, (2) vascular biology, (3) stem cell biology, (4) cardiovascular disease modeling (5) cardio-oncology.

  • Lidia Schapira

    Lidia Schapira

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioI am a medical oncologist focused on breast cancer and cancer survivorship. My career goal is to improve outcomes and experiences of patients and caregivers living with and beyond cancer, and my research and scholarship have contributed to understanding and meeting the needs of the growing population of cancer survivors. My editorial work for the Journal of Clinical Oncology has given me the opportunity to shape the discourse in oncology and as Editor-in-Chief of Cancer.Net I can bring high quality information about cancer to the lay public.

  • David Schneider

    David Schneider

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    On Partial Leave from 04/01/2022 To 03/01/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study innate immunity and microbial pathogenesis. We have been studying models for a variety of bacterial infections including: Listeria, Mycobacteria, Salmonella and Streptococcus as well as some fungi, malaria and viruses. Our current focus is to determine how we recover from infections.

  • Alan Schroeder

    Alan Schroeder

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics
    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care
    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioDr. Schroeder is the associate chief for research in the division of pediatric hospital medicine at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and a clinical professor in the division of hospital medicine and the division of critical care. His research interests focus on identifying areas where we can “safely do less” in healthcare, striving to ensure that children get the healthcare that they need while avoiding excessive tests and treatments that only cause harm. Dr. Schroeder is currently involved in multiple projects involving common conditions and interventions in pediatrics such as head trauma, bronchiolitis, UTI, meningitis, febrile infant management, and third molar extractions. He is a co-chair of the Lown RightCare Alliance Pediatric Council, co-chair of the Academic Pediatric Association’s Healthcare Value Special Interest Group, an editor of the Yearbook of Pediatrics and an associate editor for the journal Hospital Pediatrics. Dr. Schroeder provides clinical care for children in the PICU and the pediatric ward.

  • Matthew P. Scott

    Matthew P. Scott

    Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research has been focused on the genetic regulation of animal development and its relation to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We studied mechanisms and functions of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which controls cell fates and growth, in the context of normal development and brain cancer. We studied a neurodegenerative disease, Niemann-Pick C syndrome, that affects intracellular organelle movements and sterol homeostasis. Due to Dr. Scott's new job, the lab is no longer active.

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Associate Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Zachary M. Sellers, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    BioI am a pediatric physician-scientist striving to advance cystic fibrosis clinical care and translational research. Clinically, I am focused on gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis, developing diagnostic and therapeutic modalities to improve the gastrointestinal and liver health of those with cystic fibrosis. I also specialize in the clinical management of pediatric pancreatitis and am involved with the international INSPPIRE consortium to study pediatric pancreatitis. My research spans the entire spectrum across basic science and translational research to clinical research and trials. In the laboratory, my projects are centered around understanding mechanisms of ion transport in cystic fibrosis tissues and determining how loss of CFTR ion transport leads to pathologic changes in human physiology. We are also very interested in the pathophysiological relationship between pancreatitis and intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease. Our laboratory has expertise in epithelial ion transport, with specialized skills in the measurement of bicarbonate transport. We are also part of a Multi-PI collaboration pursuing CFTR gene editing and stem cell engraftment for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. We utilize a combination of immortalized and primary cell culture, organoids, mouse and human tissue, and whole animal in vivo studies.

  • Chris Severyn

    Chris Severyn

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research focuses on the influence of the microbiome on clinical outcomes in the pediatric oncology, hematology, and bone marrow transplant populations.

  • Ami J. Shah

    Ami J. Shah

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    BioI joined Stanford University in 2015 as a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology/ Oncology, Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine, having completed my training in Pediatric Hematology/ Oncology at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. My areas of clinical expertise have been in the areas of transplantation for immune deficiencies and immune reconstitution post HSCT. I have been actively involved with the care and treatment of children with primary immune deficiencies and work with the Primary Immune Deficiencies Consortium (PIDTC). I am very interested in cellular therapies as a treatment modality for rare genetic diseases. I currently am the PI for several gene therapy trials at Stanford for various disorders including cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (cALD), Sickle Cell Anemia, Thalassemia and Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency. My other main areas of research have been in studying the late effects of patients following stem cell transplantation, in specific the neurocognitive function post HSCT. I have been involved with several national committees addressing the late effects of HSCT within the ASBMT and COG.

    In addition to my research work in stem cell transplantation, I have been actively involved with mentorship and graduate medical education. I am currently the Program Director for the Hematology/ Oncology Fellowship and serve as a mentor through the Pediatric Mentoring Group.

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system.

  • Sejal Shah

    Sejal Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary research interest is evaluating whether vitamin D supplementation can positively affect consequences of the metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adolescents. Other research interests include evaluating the efficacy and biochemical profiles of various types of estrogen replacement in adolescent females.

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Jonathan Shaw

    Jonathan Shaw

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary care, psycho-social determinants of health & care, maternal-child health

  • Kate Shaw, MD MS

    Kate Shaw, MD MS

    Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include expanding access to and and improving patient experience with contraception and abortion care both domestically and globally. I am also interested in medical education and resilience among physicians and trainees.

  • Xinshu She

    Xinshu She

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current interests include global mental health promotion and prevention in underserved pediatric populations, refugee health in US-Mexico borders, minority mental health in the US, physician wellness and gender equity, Diversity and Inclusion research and education.

  • Kevin Shea

    Kevin Shea

    Chambers-Okamura Endowed Professor of Pediatric Orthopaedics

    BioKevin G. Shea, MD is an orthopaedic surgeon at Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. Dr. Shea grew up in Montana and California, graduated from the UCLA School of Medicine, and completed his orthopaedic residency at the University of Utah School of Medicine. His advanced training includes pediatric orthopaedics at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego, AO Fellowship in Bern Switzerland with Drs. Ganz (Hip), Dr. Diego Fernandez (Trauma), and Dr. Hans Staubli (sports), and Ilizarov Training in Lecco, Italy. He was the AOSSM Traveling Sports Medicine Fellow in 2008, and practiced in Boise, ID prior to joining the Stanford Faculty. Dr. Shea is a founding member of the PRiSM Society (Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine) and the ROCK (Research in OsteoChondritis of the Knee) Multi-center Study Group. He is a member of the AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons), POSNA (Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America) and the AOSSM (American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine). In addition, Dr. Shea has authored more than 170 scientific papers and book chapters.

  • Hiroyuki Shimada

    Hiroyuki Shimada

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics

    BioHiroyuki Shimada, MD, PhD, FRCPA (Hon), is Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center. He was born in Tokyo, Japan, and completed MD (1973) and PhD (1982) at the Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan, and also completed his pathology training at the Children's Hospital (now the Nationwide Children’s Hospital) and the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA (1988). Before moving to the Stanford University in 2019, he was Professor of Pathology (Clinical Scholar) at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and working at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.
    Dr. Shimada was Chair of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (1999-2017) and the founder of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC). As Director of the COG (Children’s Oncology Group) Neuroblastoma Pathology Reference Laboratory (since 2001), he has been actively reviewing pathology samples of ~700 neuroblastoma cases per year from United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Pathology review results according to the INPC have been providing critical information for patient stratification and protocol assignment in the COG international neuroblastoma clinical trials.

  • Andrew Young Shin

    Andrew Young Shin

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSURF PROGRAM
    The SURF program is an innovative collaboration between LPCH, Stanford University Hospital and the Stanford School of Engineering. The program has focused on improving quality and safety of patient care, improving hospital operations and promoting clinical effectiveness utilizing contemporary technologies such as machine learning, mathematical optimization, simulation and a variety of statistical, probabilistic and computational tools. The program has 2 independent funding mechanism to primarily improve patient care/hospital operations and improve academics for faculty within the department of Pediatrics at LPCH.

    https://surf.stanford.edu/


    CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
    The Clinical Effectiveness (CE) Program is a funded program that aims to understand and improve unnecessary variation in healthcare delivery in order to optimize quality of care and reduce wasteful expenditures. The CE program has developed innovative programs such as Target Based Care, an award-winning intervention to reduce variation in hospital length of stay and currently a multi-center trial involving more than 20 hospitals in North America. In 2016, the CE program included the first CE fellowship program in a pediatric training program with 3 cycles of graduates. The CE program is supported by LPCH and a philanthropic gift by Susan Choe and Thomas Tobiason.

  • Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe timing for intervention in obstruction in the infant and child is poorly understood.Our group has been interested in trying to define the risks that may be involved in obstructive and infectious uropathies and discovering early signs of damage to the urinary tract and kidney. We have explored ways of imaging the urinary tract using nonionizing radiation (US, MRI). We have studied the relationships of sex steroid hormones, pregnancy, reflux, urinary tract infection and urinary tract function.

  • Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)
    On Leave from 11/01/2021 To 10/17/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Regulation of Intestinal Development and Maturation. We study transcriptional mechanisms regulating the spatial and temporal restriction of intestine-specific gene expression during gut development. Our approach is to characterize the function of gene-specific DNA cis elements and interacting nuclear proteins in cell culture and in transgenic animals. The goal is to relate the gene-specific control mechanisms to the broader pathways specifying acquisition of gut phenotypes.

  • Douglas Sidell, MD

    Douglas Sidell, MD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Sidell's clinical interests include the management of children with voice and swallowing disorders, and congenital or acquired airway abnormalities. Examples of ongoing or upcoming prospective trials include an investigation into the utility of acid suppression in children with laryngomalacia, the management of vocal cord paralysis following cardiac surgery, and the management of type 1 laryngeal clefts in children.

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org

  • Dawn H. Siegel, MD

    Dawn H. Siegel, MD

    Clinical Professor, Dermatology
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics - Operations

    BioDawn Siegel, MD is a Professor in Dermatology at Stanford University. She is affiliated with Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH) at Stanford and Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC). She received her medical degree from University of Wisconsin -Madison and completed her dermatology residency and pediatric dermatology fellowship at University of California San Francisco. She has been in practice for over 14 years. She specializes in hemangiomas, birthmarks, vascular anomalies, and neurocutaneous syndromes. Her research interests are in hemangiomas and the related multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, PHACE (Posterior Fossa anomalies, Hemangiomas, Arterial anomalies, Cardiac defects, and Eye anomalies), RASopathies and health disparities.

  • Norman H. Silverman

    Norman H. Silverman

    Honorary Faculty Emeritus, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests center around cardiac ultrasound. I am currently working on several areas in the development of human cardiac ultrasound.

    These are fetal cardiac ultrasound. intraoperative and transesophageal ultrasound imaging in children, imaging potiential for ultrasound two and three dimensional modalities in children with congenital heart disease

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    BioJulia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford’s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Laura Simons

    Laura Simons

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe primary goal of my research is to promote the health and well being of children and adolescents with chronic pain and their families. In line with this goal, research projects focus on biological, neurological, cognitive, affective, and social risk and resiliency factors of the pain experience. Projects include brain imaging, longitudinal clinical cohort, and treatment interventions studies.

    Some current research orojects include:

    Learning and Memory in Pediatric Chronic Pain
    Funding: NIH/NICHD R01
    Description: Investigating the mechanisms underlying fear learning, extinction and disruption of fear reconsolidation in adolescents with chronic pain and health controls using behavioral and neuroimaging measures. Multi-site study with Boston Children's Hospital (Collaborator: David Borsook, MD).

    Children Pain Behaviors in Context: A functional-cognitive perspective
    Leading Site: University of Ghent (Collaborator: Liesbet Goubert, PhD)
    Description: Identifying key antecedents and consequences that give rise to and maintain children's pain-related behaviors and investigate impact these antecedents on children's behavior and functioning through daily surveys and activity monitoring.

  • Manpreet K. Singh, MD MS

    Manpreet K. Singh, MD MS

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Singh conducts research in the phenomenology, neurobiology, pharmacology, and genetic aspects of depression and bipolar disorder in children. These studies include brain imaging (MRI, MRS, fMRI), medication, and psychotherapy trials. She is particularly interested in risk factors for the development of major mood disorders and associated morbidities, and early intervention strategies to delay the onset and progression of symptoms.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • Stephanie Melissa Smith

    Stephanie Melissa Smith

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am involved with clinical research related to cancer survivorship, with a particular focus on late effects of childhood cancer treatments and community partnerships to improve health equity for adolescent/young adult cancer survivors in under-resourced settings.

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    BioDr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    BioIvan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMP signaling
    BMP signaling in health and disease in the right ventricle of the heart
    "BMP signature" in blood as a biomarker
    BMP signaling in neonatal chronic lung disease

  • Daniel Spielman

    Daniel Spielman

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are in the field of medical imaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. Current projects include MRI and MRS at high magnetic fields and metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled MRS.

  • Alfred M. Spormann

    Alfred M. Spormann

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Biology
    On Leave from 01/01/2022 To 06/30/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMetabolism of anaerobic microbes in diseases, bioenergy, and bioremediation

  • James Spudich

    James Spudich

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Disease, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe general research interest of this laboratory is the molecular basis of cell motility, with a current emphasis on power output by the human heart. We have three specific research interests, the molecular basis of energy transduction that leads to ATP-driven myosin movement on actin, the biochemical basis of the regulation of actin and myosin interaction and their assembly states, and the roles these proteins play in vivo, in cell movement, changes in cell shape and muscle contraction.

  • Sheri Spunt

    Sheri Spunt

    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cancer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses primarily on the management of children, adolescents, and young adults with soft tissue sarcomas. I also have an interest in developmental therapeutics and late effects of cancer therapy,

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D is a Professor of Medicine Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and by courtesy, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stefanick’s research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. She is currently the Principal Investigator the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Extension Study, having been the PI of the Stanford Clinical Center of the landmark WHI Clinical Trials and Observational Study since 1994 and Chair of the WHI Steering and Executive Committees from 1998-2011, as well as PI of the WHI Strong and Healthy (WHISH) Trial which is testing the hypothesis that a DHHS-based physical activity intervention, being delivered to a multi-ethnic cohort of about 24,000 WHI participants across the U.S., aged 68-99 when the trial started in 2015, will reduce major cardiovascular events over 8 years, compared to an equal number of “usual activity” controls. Dr. Stefanick is also PI of the Osteoporotic Study of Men (MrOS) which is continuing to conduct clinical assessments of bone and body composition in survivors of an original cohort of nearly 6000 men aged 65 and over in 2001. As founding Director of the Stanford Women’s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM, “wisdom”) Center, she plays a major role in promoting research and teaching on Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease, Women’s Health and Queer Health and Medicine. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles at the Stanford School of Medicine, including as co-leader of the Population Sciences Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford’s NCI-funded comprehensive cancer center.

    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology, with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research led to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been her academic home for nearly 40 years.

  • Katherine Steffen

    Katherine Steffen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on using dissemination and implementation science tools to study and enhance care provided to patients in the pediatric ICU. I have a background in human factors research and in implementation science and am also interested in clinical effectiveness and outcomes in the PICU.

  • Lea Steffes

    Lea Steffes

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    BioDr. Steffes, a Wisconsin native, completed medical school and pediatric residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She then moved to the Bay Area and completed her clinical fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine at Stanford University in 2020. Additionally, Dr. Steffes received further post-doctoral training in the laboratories of Dr. Maya Kumar and Dr. David Cornfield, studying the cellular and molecular mechanism driving pulmonary vascular disease. In addition to her role as an Instructor in Pediatrics in the division of Pulmonary Medicine, Dr. Steffes is also completing an advanced clinical fellowship in Pulmonary Hypertension at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. Her clinical work consists of caring for patients with pediatric pulmonary and pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, interstitial lung disease, respiratory failure, chronic cough and asthma. Her research is focused on the vascular changes seen in pulmonary hypertension, more specifically understanding the cellular characteristics of occlusive neointimal lesions, the abnormal cells that block pulmonary blood flow in pulmonary hypertension. In her most recent work, Dr. Steffes identified a subset of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells that are the cell of origin for the pathologic neointimal cells and a specific signaling pathway, that when blocked, inhibits the formation of neointimal lesions.

    Dr. Steffes is currently employing advanced single cell sequencing technologies to further understand neointimal cells with the ultimate goal identifying new therapies for pulmonary hypertension, a fatal disease with no known cure.

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

  • Lars Steinmetz

    Lars Steinmetz

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe apply diverse genomic approaches to understand how genetic variation affects health and disease by: 1) functional and mechanistic analyses of gene regulation, 2) studies of meiotic recombination and inheritance, 3) analyses of genetic and environmental interactions, and 4) characterization of diseases in human cells and model organisms. We integrate wet lab and computational genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic approaches, and develop technologies to enable personalized medicine.

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImmunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis, and the parasitic disease, trypanosomiasis.

  • David Stevenson

    David Stevenson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on disorders of the RAS/MAPK pathway (eg. NF1, Noonan, CFC, and Costello syndrome). I am working on understanding the impact of RAS signaling on the musculoskeletal system. I use genomic approaches to identify somatic events and modifiers in the RASopathies. I am also involved in identifying outcome measures for use in clinical trials for the associated orthopedic manifestations. Other areas of research involve vascular anomalies, Prader-Willi syndrome, and hypophosphatasia.

  • David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on the study of the ontogeny and control of heme catabolism and bilirubin production in the developing neonate. A better understanding of the role of increased bilirubin production in neonatal jaundice and the prevention of hemolytic jaundice has remained an overall objective of our program. We are also study the causes of preterm birth and ways to prevent it.

  • Tanya Stoyanova

    Tanya Stoyanova

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStoyanova lab develops new early cancer detection methods and therapeutic strategies for late stage cancers. The current research focus is on protein-based biomarkers for early cancer detection as well as development of new small molecule inhibitors and antibody-based therapies for prostate and other epithelial cancers. The ultimate goals of the laboratory are to improve the early diagnosis and prognosis of clinically significant cancers and guide the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for metastatic prostate and other epithelial cancers.

  • Aaron F. Straight

    Aaron F. Straight

    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the biology of chromosomes. Our research is focused on understanding how chromosomal domains are specialized for unique functions in chromosome segregation, cell division and cell differentiation. We are particularly interested in the genetic and epigenetic processes that govern vertebrate centromere function, in the organization of the genome in the eukaryotic nucleus and in the roles of RNAs in the regulation of chromosome structure.

  • Sarah Streett

    Sarah Streett

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. Sarah Streett is a Clinical Professor of Medicine, the Director of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Education at Stanford, and she is passionate about taking care of people with IBD. She is a national expert in treating complex IBD and initiated a multi-disciplinary approach to care with colorectal surgery, pediatrics, and nutrition. In 2018 she received the Champion of Hope Award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation and serves on their National Scientific Advisory Committee. Her interests focus on fertility and pregnancy in people with IBD, developing precision approaches to IBD therapy, and the role that the microbiome and diet play in its pathogenesis. She is a primary investigator of the Stanford IBD Registry and has research projects focused on optimizing clinical outcomes in IBD, the role of the microbiota and diet in IBD and pregnancy, and applying new technologies to individualizing therapy for IBD. She is also the primary investigator on multiple industry-sponsored IBD trials.

    Teaching is a top priority for Dr. Streett who feels that mentoring fellows in the development of their careers is a privilege. She has held many national leadership roles in the American Gastroenterological Association, where she has been Chair of the Practice Management and Economics Committee, and currently serves on the Government Affairs Committee. She also an appointed member of the Gastrointestinal Drug Advisory Committee at the FDA. She has represented the interests of gastroenterologists and their patients on Capitol Hill numerous times. Dr. Streett believes strongly in a collaborative approach to give patients personalized care based on the latest therapies for the treatment of IBD and is committed to mentoring the next generation of experts in the field.

  • Matthew Strehlow

    Matthew Strehlow

    Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine
    On Leave from 06/15/2022 To 08/15/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Strehlow's research is focused on global health and global emergency care. Working with in-country partners, he aims to identify the epidemiology of emergencies in developing countries and leverage the growth of emergency care systems in innovative ways to improve the overall health of the population. Specific examples include improving patient flow between the community and different level facilities and using emergency call center infrastructure to combat gender based violence.

  • Felice Su

    Felice Su

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical pharmacology research is focused on investigating the impact of dynamic organ function on drug disposition and designing dosing strategies based on mathematical models that account for these changes in order to optimize safe medication administration in critically ill children.

    Research through the REVIVE Initiative for Resuscitation Excellence investigates the quality of resuscitation during cardiopulmonary arrest. Areas of focus include early identification during the no-flow state prior to CPR initiation and quality of CPR simulation education.

  • Leslee L.Subak, MD

    Leslee L.Subak, MD

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the association of weight and urinary incontinence (UI) in women and clinical trials to test strategies to improve outcomes in women’s genitourinary health. We have shown the independent association of weight and UI and the efficacy of weight loss to treat women with UI. I also conduct studies of epidemiology, economics and cost-effectiveness, and novel interventions for UI, sexual dysfunction, vaginal atrophy, pelvic organ prolapse and menopause symptoms.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformation transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Pervez Sultan

    Pervez Sultan

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Pervez Sultan is an Associate Professor of Obstetric Anesthesiology, at Stanford University School of Medicine and also holds an Honorary Faculty position as Associate Professor at University College London. His research interests include defining, characterizing and measuring postpartum recovery.

    Pervez is an Arline and Pete Harman Endowed Faculty Scholar of the Stanford Maternal and Child Health Research Institute at Stanford University.

    He currently serves on the Annual Meeting and Live Events and Curriculum Steering Committees of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology in addition to the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Subcommittee for Obstetric Anesthesia and the International Anesthesia Research Society. He is a former recipient of the UK National Institute of Academic Anesthesia Research Award.

    Researchgate profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pervez_Sultan2
    Google Scholar profile: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Z2ftv_IAAAAJ&hl=en
    Twitter: @PervezSultanMD
    Website: www.postpartumrecovery.net

  • Meghan Sumner

    Meghan Sumner

    Associate Professor of Linguistics

    BioI am an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at Stanford University. I conduct research examining the representations and mechanisms listeners use to understand spoken language, and how linguistic and social factors affect speech perception and word recognition. My current research centers around two main themes: (1) Investigating the effects social information cued by different voices have on memory, and the way social biases result in misremembering, and (2) Using foundational psycholinguistic methodologies to understand how speakers and speaker groups who are new to a community (e.g., the case of Syrian refugees in Germany) accommodate to cultural norms within their native languages.

  • Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Yang Sun, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in the role of inositol phosphatases in eye development and disease, using both animal models and human disease tissue. We are a translational laboratory seeking to understand the basic function of proteins as well as developing therapeutic strategies for clinical trials.

  • Zijie Sun

    Zijie Sun

    Professor of Urology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe focus on understanding the molecular mechanism of transcription factors that govern the transformation of normal cells to a neoplastic state. We are especially interested in nuclear hormone action and its interactions with other signaling pathways in tumor development and progression.