Graduate School of Education


Showing 321-330 of 340 Results

  • Camille Whitney

    Camille Whitney

    BioCamille is a doctoral candidate in Education Policy and the Economics of Education and an IES fellow. Before coming to Stanford, Camille taught high school math in Memphis and worked as a Research Analyst at Child Trends in Washington, D.C. Her research interests include identifying effective educational policies and practices for underserved students and English Language Learners, fostering engagement and socio-emotional skills in school, and the effects of mindfulness programs for students and educators.

  • Carl Wieman

    Carl Wieman

    DRC Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Physics and of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Wieman group’s research generally focuses on the nature of expertise in science and engineering, particularly physics, and how that expertise is best learned, measured, and taught. This involves a range of approaches, including individual cognitive interviews, laboratory experiments, and classroom interventions with controls for comparisons. We are also looking at how different classroom practices impact the attitudes and learning of different demographic groups.

  • Peter Williamson

    Peter Williamson

    Director, Stanford Teacher Education Program for Secondary Teachers and Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education

    BioPeter Williamson is an Associate Professor, Teaching, at Stanford University. He is the Faculty Director of the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) for Secondary Teachers. Before coming to Stanford, Peter was an associate professor at the University of San Francisco, were he co-founded the San Francisco Teacher Residency Program. He earned his doctorate at Stanford, and he studies urban education, English education, education with incarcerated youth, curriculum, and literacy. Peter began his career as a special education teacher working with students who were identified with emotional and behavioral challenges, and then later taught middle and high school English and journalism in the Bay Area’s urban schools.

  • John Willinsky

    John Willinsky

    Khosla Family Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI work under the auspices of the Public Knowledge Project which is focused on extending access to, and the accessibility of, research and scholarship. The research is on student, professional, and public access to this educational resource, while PKP also engages in developing and designing open source software (free) publishing systems to improve the public and scholarly quality of peer-reviewed journals. This also involves international collaborations in Latin America, Africa, and South-East Asia are aimed at helping to better understand and strengthen scholarly publishing in those areas.

  • Sam Wineburg

    Sam Wineburg

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education and Professor, by courtesy, of History

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDistinguishing what is true in our current digital mess; the teaching and learning of history

    New book out in 2018, Why Learn History (When It's Already on Your Phone)

    How young people make decisions about what to believe on the Internet.

    New forms of assessment to measure historical understanding

    The creation of Web-based environments for the learning and teaching of history

  • Caroline Winterer

    Caroline Winterer

    Willilam Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Classics and of Education

    BioCaroline Winterer is William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies at Stanford University. She is also Professor (by courtesy) of Classics.

    She specializes in American history before 1900, especially the history of ideas, political thought, and the history of science. She is currently writing a book on the history of deep time in America.

    Her most recent book is American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason (Yale, 2016). In it, she shows how early Americans grappled with the promises of the Enlightenment--how they used new questions about the plants, animals, rocks, politics, religions, and peoples of the New World to imagine a new relationship between the present and the past, and to spur far-flung conversations about a better future for all of humanity.

    For mapping the social network of Benjamin Franklin, she received an American Ingenuity Award from the Smithsonian Institution. She is an elected member of the Society of American Historians (for literary distinction in the writing of history), a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians, and an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society. She has received fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Humanities Center, the Stanford Humanities Center, and the Spencer Foundation, among others. She has published peer-reviewed articles in the American Historical Review, Journal of American History, William and Mary Quarterly, American Quarterly, Journal of the Early Republic, Eighteenth-Century Studies, and Modern Intellectual History. Winterer has also curated two exhibits of rare books and artifacts: Ancient Rome & America at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia (2010) and also The American Enlightenment at the Stanford Library (2011).

    From 2013-2019, she was Director of the Stanford Humanities Center.