Bio-X


Showing 1-50 of 71 Results

  • Alex Macario MD MBA

    Alex Macario MD MBA

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Macario studies health care economics & outcomes, with a special focus on surgery and anesthesia. He is well known for helping develop the field of operating room management, and is keenly interested in the cost-effectiveness analyses of drugs and devices. For the past decade Dr. Macario has added medical education as a research priority to better understand methods to best teach students and residents. Google Scholar calculates Dr. Macario’s H-Index as 45 and his I-10 as 99.

  • Bruce Macintosh

    Bruce Macintosh

    Professor of Physics

    BioBruce Macintosh's research focusses on the study of extrasolar planets, in particular the study of such planets through direct imaging, and on using adaptive optics to shape the wavefronts of light for a variety of applications. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets involves blocking, suppressing, and subtracting the light of the bright parent star so that a planet hundreds of thousands of times fainter can be seen and studied in detail. Prof. Macintosh is the Principal Investigator of the Gemini Planet Imager http://planetimager.org/ ,an advanced adaptive optics planet-finder for the Gemini South telescope,. He also leads a Science Investigation Team for the coronagraph instrument on the WFIRST mission, focused on imaging and spectroscopy of extrasolar planets.

  • M Bruce MacIver

    M Bruce MacIver

    Professor (Research) of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study drug effects on the nervous system. Cellular, synaptic and molecular drug actions are investigated using electrophysiological and pharmacological tools in cortical/hippocampal brain slice preparations. We are also interested in mechanisms of neuronal integration and synchronization, especially related to patterns of EEG activity seen in vivo and in brain slices.

  • Crystal Mackall

    Crystal Mackall

    Ernest and Amelia Gallo Family Professor and Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRecent clinical studies, by us and others, have demonstrated that T cell based immunotherapy can eradicate cancers resistant to all other available therapies. Our program creates, develops and optimizes genetically engineered T cells to treat cancer. We link the bench with the bedside, developing novel therapies for early phase testing in clinical trials, while simultaneously conducting intensive studies on clinical samples obtained from patients treated on immunotherapy trials.

  • Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Redlich Professor, Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMultiple NIH funded projects to characterize CNS mechanisms of human pain. Comparative effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and chronic pain self-management within the context of opioid reduction (PCORI funded). Single session pain catastrophizing treatment: comparative efficacy & mechanisms (NIH R01). Development and implementation of an open-source learning healthcare system, CHOIR (http://choir/stanford.edu), to optimize pain care and innovative research in real-world patients.

  • Daniel V. Madison

    Daniel V. Madison

    Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is interested in the function and plasticity CNS synapses, including studies of the detailed structure and protein content of synapses in different plastic states. We also have a strong interest in the pathophysiology of Azheimer’s disease as related to endocannabinoids. We use primarily electrophysiogy and high-resolution array tomographic imaging to dissect the function of synapses undergoing changes due either to external stimuli, disease states or internal modulation.

  • Merritt Maduke

    Merritt Maduke

    Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of chloride channels & transporters studied by integration of structural and electrophysiological methods.

  • Holden Maecker

    Holden Maecker

    Professor (Research) of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm interested in immune monitoring of T cell responses to chronic pathogens and cancer, and the correlation of T cell response signatures with disease protection.

  • Vinit Mahajan, MD, PhD

    Vinit Mahajan, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur focus is the development of personalized medicine for eye diseases through translation of our discoveries in proteomics, genomics, and phenomics in humans, mice and tissue culture models.

  • Danielle Mai

    Danielle Mai

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    BioDanielle J. Mai joined the Department of Chemical Engineering at Stanford in January 2020. She earned her B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign under the guidance of Prof. Charles M. Schroeder. Danielle was an Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow in Prof. Bradley D. Olsen's group at MIT, where she engineered materials with selective biomolecular transport properties, elucidated mechanisms of toughness and extensibility in entangled associative hydrogels, and developed high-throughput methods for the discovery of polypeptide materials. The Mai Research Group integrates precise biopolymer engineering with multiscale experimental characterization to advance biomaterials development and to enhance fundamental understanding of soft matter physics.

  • Ravindra Majeti MD, PhD

    Ravindra Majeti MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Majeti lab focuses on the molecular/genomic characterization and therapeutic targeting of leukemia stem cells in human hematologic malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our lab uses experimental hematology methods, stem cell assays, genome editing, and bioinformatics to define and investigate drivers of leukemia stem cell behavior. As part of these studies, we have led the development and application of robust xenotransplantation assays for human hematopoietic cells.

  • Robbie Majzner

    Robbie Majzner

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioRobbie Majzner is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology and Oncology. After graduating with a BA from Columbia University, Dr. Majzner attended Harvard Medical School, where he developed an interest in pediatric oncology. He completed his residency training in pediatrics at New York Presbyterian-Columbia and fellowship training in pediatric hematology-oncology at Johns Hopkins and the National Cancer Institute. During his fellowship, he cared for some of the first pediatric patients to receive CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, children with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) who often had no other therapeutic option. Witnessing the success of CAR T cells in these patients drove Dr. Majzner to the laboratory, where he focuses on extending the use of CAR T cells to solid tumors. He has generated and optimized novel receptors to recognize antigens over-expressed on pediatric solid tumors such as GD2 (Mount/Majzner et al., Nature Medicine, 2018) B7-H3 (Majzner et al., Clinical Cancer Research, 2019), and ALK (Walker/Majzner et al., Molecular Therapy, 2017). Current work focuses on imparting multi-specificity to CAR T cells and optimizing these receptors to enhance their efficacy when the amount of target (antigen density) is limiting (Majzner et al., ASH 2018). By drawing on state of the art bioengineering techniques, the Majzner Laboratory focuses on enhancing the potency and specificity of CAR T cells for children with cancer.

    Clinically, Dr. Majzner cares for all patients with neuroblastoma at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and has a specific interest in bringing novel immunotherapies to clinical trials for these patients and those with other solid tumors. He is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric hematology-oncology.

  • Yvonne Maldonado

    Yvonne Maldonado

    Senior Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Diversity, Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on epidemiologic aspects of viral vaccines and perinatal HIV infection. This includes the molecular epidemiology of factors affecting the immunogenicity of oral polio vaccine (OPV) in developing areas of the world, and now the epidemiology of transmission and circulation of vaccine derived polioviruses in order to assist in global eradication of polio. I also work in development of methods to prevent breastfeeding transmission of HIV in Africa.

  • Robert Malenka

    Robert Malenka

    Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLong-lasting changes in synaptic strength are important for the modification of neural circuits by experience. A major goal of my laboratory is to elucidate the molecular events that trigger various forms of synaptic plasticity and the modifications in synaptic proteins that are responsible for the changes in synaptic efficacy.

  • Sanjay Malhotra

    Sanjay Malhotra

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology), of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on the design and discovery of synthetic, and natural product inspired small molecules which can be used as probes for developing understanding of biological phenomena, including protein-protein interactions and modulation of signal transduction pathways. My laboratory employs the tools of synthetic medicinal chemistry, molecular modeling and chemical biology for translational research in drug discovery, development, imaging and radiation.

  • Parag Mallick

    Parag Mallick

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Mallick Lab is focused on using integrative, multi-omic approaches to model the processes that govern cellular dynamics and to use those models to discover cancer biomarkers and molecular mechanisms.

  • Edward Manche, MD

    Edward Manche, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology at Stanford University Medical Center

    BioEdward E. Manche, MD is Professor of Ophthalmology and Director of the Cornea and Refractive Surgery Service at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine and completed residency training at the University of Medicine and Dentistry at New Jersey where he served as Chief Resident. He completed a two-year fellowship in Cornea and Refractive Surgery at the Jules Stein Eye Institute at UCLA.

    Dr. Manche is a fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and received its Achievement Award in 2003 and its Senior Achievement Award in 2014. He was elected to active membership in the American Ophthalmological Society in 2011, and is recognized in Best Doctors in America and Guide to America's Top Physicians. He serves on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, Journal of Ophthalmology, Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology and Journal of Refractive Surgery.

    He lectures widely on topics in cornea and refractive surgery and has published over 115 peer-reviewed articles and 25 book chapters.

  • Christopher Manning

    Christopher Manning

    Thomas M. Siebel Professor in Machine Learning, Professor of Linguistics and of Computer Science

    BioChristopher Manning is a professor of computer science and linguistics at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He works on software that can intelligently process, understand, and generate human language material. He is a leader in applying Deep Learning to Natural Language Processing, including exploring Tree Recursive Neural Networks, neural network dependency parsing, the GloVe model of word vectors, neural machine translation, question answering, and deep language understanding. He also focuses on computational linguistic approaches to parsing, robust textual inference and multilingual language processing, including being a principal developer of Stanford Dependencies and Universal Dependencies. Manning is an ACM Fellow, a AAAI Fellow, an ACL Fellow, and a Past President of ACL. He has coauthored leading textbooks on statistical natural language processing and information retrieval. He is a member of the Stanford NLP group (@stanfordnlp) and manages development of the Stanford CoreNLP software.

  • M. Peter Marinkovich, MD

    M. Peter Marinkovich, MD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Marinkovich lab studies the function of epithelial extracellular matrix molecules, including integrins, collagens and laminins in epithelial development and carcinoma progression. We apply our discoveries in this area towards development of molecular therapies for carcinomas, hair disease and inherited epithelial adhesive disorders.

  • Thomas Markland

    Thomas Markland

    Associate Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research centers on problems at the interface of quantum and statistical mechanics. Particular themes that occur frequently in our research are hydrogen bonding, the interplay between structure and dynamics, systems with multiple time and length-scales and quantum mechanical effects. The applications of our methods are diverse, ranging from chemistry to biology to geology and materials science. Particular current interests include proton and electron transfer in fuel cells and enzymatic systems, atmospheric isotope separation and the control of catalytic chemical reactivity using electric fields.

    Treatment of these problems requires a range of analytic techniques as well as molecular mechanics and ab initio simulations. We are particularly interested in developing and applying methods based on the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics to include quantum fluctuations such as zero-point energy and tunneling in the dynamics of liquids and glasses. This formalism, in which a quantum mechanical particle is mapped onto a classical "ring polymer," provides an accurate and physically insightful way to calculate reaction rates, diffusion coefficients and spectra in systems containing light atoms. Our work has already provided intriguing insights in systems ranging from diffusion controlled reactions in liquids to the quantum liquid-glass transition as well as introducing methods to perform path integral calculations at near classical computational cost, expanding our ability to treat large-scale condensed phase systems.

  • Ellen Markman

    Ellen Markman

    Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences and the Lewis M. Terman Professor

    BioMarkman’s research interests include the relationship between language and thought; early word learning; categorization and induction; theory of mind and pragmatics; implicit theories and conceptual change, and how theory-based explanations can be effective interventions in health domains.

  • Michael Marmor, MD

    Michael Marmor, MD

    Professor of Ophthalmology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch concerns diseases of retinal function, techniques of clinical electrophysiology, and experimental studies on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) function including fluid transport and retinal adhesiveness. Other studies consider aspects of vision and art, and ophthalmic history.
    Published over 300 journal articles, chapters, books (only selected articles listed).

  • Alison Marsden

    Alison Marsden

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab at Stanford develops novel computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, and medical devices. We have a particular interest in pediatric cardiology, and use virtual surgery to design novel surgical concepts for children born with heart defects.

  • Olivia Martinez

    Olivia Martinez

    Professor (Research) of Surgery (Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHost-Pathogen interactions; EBV B cell lymphomas; pathways of immune evasion in the growth and survival of EBV B cell lymphomas; mechanisms of graft rejection and tolerance induction; stem cell and solid organ transplantation.

  • Todd Martinez

    Todd Martinez

    David Mulvane Ehrsam and Edward Curtis Franklin Professor in Chemistry and Professor of Photon Science

    BioTheoretical chemist Todd Martínez develops and applies new methods that predict and explain how atoms move in molecules. These methods are used both to design new molecules and to understand the behavior of those that already exist. His research group studies the response of molecules to light (photochemistry) and external force (mechanochemistry). Photochemistry is a critical part of human vision, single-molecule spectroscopy, harnessing solar energy (either to make fuels or electricity), and even organic synthesis. Mechanochemistry represents a novel scheme to promote unusual reactions and potentially to create self-healing materials that resist degradation. The underlying tools embody the full gamut of quantum mechanical effects governing molecules, from chemical bond breaking/formation to electron/proton transfer and electronic excited states.

    Professor Martínez was born in Amityville, New York, but spent most of his childhood in Central America and the Caribbean. His chemical curiosity benefitted tremendously from the relaxed safety standards in Central American chemical supply houses, giving him unfettered access to strong acids and bases. When he also became interested in computation, limited or nonexistent computer access forced him to write and debug computer programs on paper. Today, Prof. Martínez combines these interests by working toward theoretical and computational modeling and design of molecules. Martínez received his PhD in chemistry from UCLA in 1994. After postdoctoral study at UCLA and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, he joined the faculty at the University of Illinois in 1996. In 2009, he joined the faculty at Stanford, where he is now the Ehrsam and Franklin Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Photon Science at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. He has received numerous awards for his contributions, including a MacArthur Fellowship (commonly known as the “genius award”). He is co-editor of Annual Reviews in Physical Chemistry, associate editor of The Journal of Chemical Physics, and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Current research in the Martínez lab aims to make molecular modeling both predictive and routine. New approaches to interactive molecular simulation are being developed, in which users interact with a virtual-reality based molecular modeling kit that fully understands quantum mechanics. New techniques to discover heretofore unknown chemical reactions are being developed and tested, exploiting the many efficient methods that the Martínez group has introduced for solving quantum mechanical problems quickly, using a combination of physical/chemical insights and commodity videogaming hardware. For more details, please visit http://mtzweb.stanford.edu.

  • Suleiman Alfred Massarweh

    Suleiman Alfred Massarweh

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work is focused in investigating mechanisms of endocrine resistance in ER-positive breast cancer and novel clinical trial designs of combined ER and targeted therapeutics. Primary areas of investigation are in metastatic disease and preoperative clinical trials.
    Additional areas of interest include breast cancer in young women, in men, and breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy.

  • Tarik F. Massoud, MD, PhD

    Tarik F. Massoud, MD, PhD

    Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current interests are in molecular and translational imaging of the brain especially in neuro-oncology and cerebrovascular diseases, experimental aspects of neuroimaging, clinical neuroradiology, neuroradiological anatomy, and research education and academic training of radiologists and scientists.

  • AC Matin

    AC Matin

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Improvement of our newly discovered cancer prodrug regimen that permits noninvaisve visualization of drug activation. 2. Tracking tumors & cancer metastases using bacterial magnetite and newly developed single-cell tracking by MRI. 3. Molecular basis of bacterial planktonic and biofilm antibiotic resistance on Earth and under space microgravity -- development of new countermeasures; 4. Bioremediation.

  • Harley H McAdams

    Harley H McAdams

    Professor (Research) of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and theoretical analysis and modeling of genetic regulatory circuits, particularly bacterial regulation and with emphasis on global regulation of Caulobacter crescentus. Bioinformatic analysis of bacterial genomes, global patterns of gene transcription and translation.

  • Jay McClelland

    Jay McClelland

    Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Linguistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research addresses topics in perception and decision making; learning and memory; language and reading; semantic cognition; and cognitive development. I view cognition as emerging from distributed processing activity of neural populations, with learning occurring through the adaptation of connections among neurons. A new focus of research in the laboratory is mathematical cognition, with an emphasis on the learning and representation of mathematical concepts and relationships.

  • Michael V. McConnell, MD, MSEE

    Michael V. McConnell, MD, MSEE

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy imaging research has involved clinical and molecular Imaging of cardiovascular disease, with a focus on coronary and vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, and vascular inflammation.

    My prevention research has involved innovative technologies to reduce coronary and vascular disease, including early disease detection plus leveraging mobile health to enhance heart-healthy activities in patients and populations.

  • Susan K. McConnell

    Susan K. McConnell

    Susan B. Ford Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSusan McConnell has studied the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Her work focused on the earliest events that pattern the developing forebrain, enable neural progenitors to divide asymmetrically to generate young neurons, propel the migration of postmitotic neurons outward into their final positions, and sculpt the fates and phenotypes of the neurons as they differentiate.

  • Paul McIntyre

    Paul McIntyre

    Rick and Melinda Reed Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Photon Science

    BioMcIntyre's group performs research on nanostructured inorganic materials for applications in electronics, energy technologies and sensors. He is best known for his work on metal oxide/semiconductor interfaces, ultrathin dielectrics, defects in complex metal oxide thin films, and nanostructured Si-Ge single crystals. His research team synthesizes materials, characterizes their structures and compositions with a variety of advanced microscopies and spectroscopies, studies the passivation of their interfaces, and measures functional properties of devices.

  • David B. McKay

    David B. McKay

    Professor of Structural Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThree-dimensional structure determination and biophysical studies of macromolecules.

  • Tracey McLaughlin

    Tracey McLaughlin

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. McLaughlin conducts a number of clinical research studies related to obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Current studies include: 1) the impact of macronutrient composition on weight loss and cardiocascular risk (diabetic and nondiabetic patients); 2) comparison of weight loss and cardiovascular risk reduction in diabetic patients treated with different classes of antihyperglycemic drugs; 3) the role of the adipocyte in modulating insulin resistance

  • Uel Jackson McMahan

    Uel Jackson McMahan

    Professor of Neurobiology and of Structural Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are currently investigating mechanisms involved in synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis using electron microscope tomography in ways that provide in situ 3D structural information at macromolecular resolution.

  • Jennifer A McNab

    Jennifer A McNab

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods that probe brain tissue microstructure. This requires new MRI contrast mechanisms, strategic encoding and reconstruction schemes, physiological monitoring, brain tissue modeling and validation. Applications of these methods include neuronavigation, neurosurgical planning and the development of improved biomarkers for brain development, degeneration, disease and injury.

  • Elizabeth Mellins

    Elizabeth Mellins

    Professor of Pediatrics (Human Gene Therapy) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms and intracellular pathways of antigen processing and presentation; structure/function of HLA-DR,-DM, -DO; mechanisms underlying HLA allele association with disease; disease mechanisms in systemic idiopathic juveile arthritis, recently found to be an HLA-linked disease.

  • Nicholas Melosh

    Nicholas Melosh

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioThe Melosh group explores how to apply new methods from the semiconductor and self-assembly fields to important problems in biology, materials, and energy. We think about how to rationally design engineered interfaces to enhance communication with biological cells and tissues, or to improve energy conversion and materials synthesis. In particular, we are interested in seamlessly integrating inorganic structures together with biology for improved cell transfection and therapies, and designing new materials, often using diamondoid molecules as building blocks.
    My group is very interested in how to design new inorganic structures that will seamless integrate with biological systems to address problems that are not feasible by other means. This involves both fundamental work such as to deeply understand how lipid membranes interact with inorganic surfaces, electrokinetic phenomena in biologically relevant solutions, and applying this knowledge into new device designs. Examples of this include “nanostraw” drug delivery platforms for direct delivery or extraction of material through the cell wall using a biomimetic gap-junction made using nanoscale semiconductor processing techniques. We also engineer materials and structures for neural interfaces and electronics pertinent to highly parallel data acquisition and recording. For instance, we have created inorganic electrodes that mimic the hydrophobic banding of natural transmembrane proteins, allowing them to ‘fuse’ into the cell wall, providing a tight electrical junction for solid-state patch clamping. In addition to significant efforts at engineering surfaces at the molecular level, we also work on ‘bridge’ projects that span between engineering and biological/clinical needs. My long history with nano- and microfabrication techniques and their interactions with biological constructs provide the skills necessary to fabricate and analyze new bio-electronic systems.


    Research Interests:
    Bio-inorganic Interface
    Molecular materials at interfaces
    Self-Assembly and Nucleation and Growth

  • Teresa Meng

    Teresa Meng

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor in Electrical Engineering and Professor of Computer Science, Emerita

    BioTeresa H. Meng is the Reid Weaver Dennis Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emerita, at Stanford University. Her research activities in the first 10 years focused on low-power circuit and system design, video signal processing, and wireless communications. In 1998, Prof. Meng took leave from Stanford and founded Atheros Communications, Inc., which developed semiconductor system solutions for wireless network communications products. After returning to Stanford in 2000 to continue her teaching and research, Prof. Meng turned her research interest to applying signal processing and IC design to bio-medical engineering. She collaborated with Prof. Krishna Shenoy on neural signal processing and neural prosthetic systems. She also directed a research group exploring wireless power transfer and implantable bio-medical devices. Prof. Meng retired from Stanford in 2013.

  • Vinod Menon

    Vinod Menon

    Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEXPERIMENTAL, CLINICAL AND THEORETICAL SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

    Cognitive neuroscience; Systems neuroscience; Cognitive development; Psychiatric neuroscience; Functional brain imaging; Dynamical basis of brain function; Nonlinear dynamics of neural systems.

  • Mark Mercola

    Mark Mercola

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    BioDr. Mercola is Professor of Medicine and Professor in the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. He completed postdoctoral training at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, was on the faculty in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School for 12 years, and later at the Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Institute and Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego before relocating to Stanford in 2015.

    Prof. Mercola is known for identifying many of the factors that are responsible for inducing and forming the heart, including the discovery that Wnt inhibition is a critical step in cardiogenesis that provided the conceptual basis and reagents for the large-scale production of cardiovascular tissues from pluripotent stem cells. He has collaborated with medicinal chemists, optical engineers and software developers to pioneer the use of patient iPSC-cardiomyocytes for disease modeling, safety pharmacology and drug development. His academic research is focused on developing and using quantitative assays of patient-specific cardiomyocyte function to discover druggable targets for preserving contractile function in heart failure and promoting regeneration following ischemic injury. He co-established drug screening and assay development at the Conrad Prebys Drug Discovery Center (San Diego), which operated as one of 4 large screening centers of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Molecular Libraries screening initiative and continues as one of the largest academic drug screening centers.

    Prof. Mercola received an NIH MERIT award for his work on heart formation, and authored over 130 papers. He holds numerous patents, including describing the invention of the first engineered dominant negative protein and small molecules for stem cell and cancer applications. He serves on multiple editorial and advisory boards, including Vala Sciences,, Regencor, The Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research and the Human Biomolecular Research Institute. His laboratory is funded by the NIH, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the Fondation Leducq.

  • Everett Meyer

    Everett Meyer

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch focus in T cell immunotherapy and T cell immune monitoring using high-throughput sequencing and genomic approaches, with an emphasis on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the treatment of graft-versus-host disease and immune tolerance induction.

  • Tobias Meyer

    Tobias Meyer

    Mrs. George A. Winzer Professor in Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCELLULAR INFORMATION PROCESSING. We are using live single-cell microscopy approaches to understand the design principles of cell signaling circuits. Mammalian signaling processes have a unique logic due to the large number of signaling proteins, second messengers and chromatin modifiers involved in each decision process. We are particularly interested in understanding how cells make decisions to enter and exit the cell cycle and how they decide to polarize and move.

  • Sara Michie

    Sara Michie

    Professor of Pathology (Research), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLymphocyte/endothelial cell adhesion mechanisms involved in lymphocyte migration to sites of inflammation; regulation of expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules.

  • Emmanuel Mignot, MD, PhD

    Emmanuel Mignot, MD, PhD

    Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research focus of the laboratory is the study of sleep and sleep disorders such as narcolepsy and Kleine Levin syndrome. We also study the neurobiological and genetic basis of the EEG and develop new tools to study sleep using nocturnal polysomnography. Approaches mostly involve human genetic studies (GWAS, sequencing), EEG signal analysis, and immunology (as narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease of the brain).

  • D. Craig Miller, M.D.

    D. Craig Miller, M.D.

    Thelma and Henry Doelger Professor in Cardiovascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiac and heart valve disease with experimental laboratory large animal projects focused on the investigation of left ventricular and cardiac mechanics, bioenergetics, and LV and mitral valve physiology and pathophysiology. Current thrust is aimed at understanding the mitral valve and subvalvular mitral apparatus and transmural LV wall strains, thickening, and myolaminar fiber-sheet mechanics.

    Clinical research interests include thoracic aortic diseases (aortic dissection, aneurysm) and cardiac valvular disease, including surgical treatment, endovascular thoracic aortic stent-graft repair, mitral valve repair, and valve-sparing aortic root replacement.