School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 51-85 of 85 Results

  • Thomas MaCurdy

    Thomas MaCurdy

    Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioThomas MaCurdy is a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute of Economic Policy Research, and he further holds appointments as a Professor of Economics and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. MaCurdy has published numerous articles and reports in professional journals and general-interest public policy venues, and he has served in an editorial capacity for several journals. He is a widely-recognized economist and expert in applied econometrics, who has developed and implemented a wide range of empirical approaches analyzing the impacts of policy in the areas of healthcare and social service programs. MaCurdy directs numerous projects supporting the activities and operations of the Center of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Congressional Budget Office (CBO), General Accounting Office (GAO), and Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), and Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC), and he has served as a member of several standing technical review committees for many federal and state government agencies (e.g., CBO, Census, BLS, California Health Benefits Review Program). MaCurdy currently supervises several empirical projects that support CMS regulatory policy responsible for the establishment of Healthcare Exchanges under the Affordable Care Act.

  • Paul Milgrom

    Paul Milgrom

    Shirley R. and Leonard W. Ely, Jr. Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Professor of Economics, Senior Fellow at SIEPR and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the GSB and of Management Science and Engineering

    BioPaul Milgrom is the Shirley and Leonard Ely professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Department of Economics at Stanford University and professor, by courtesy, in the Stanford Graduate School of Business and in the Department of Management Sciences and Engineering. Born in Detroit, Michigan on April 20, 1948, he is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a winner of the 2008 Nemmers Prize in Economics, the 2012 BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge award, the 2017 CME-MSRI prize for Innovative Quantitative Applications, and the 2018 Carty Award for the Advancement of Science.

    Milgrom is known for his work on innovative resource allocation methods, particularly in radio spectrum. He is coinventor of the simultaneous multiple round auction and the combinatorial clock auction. He also led the design team for the FCC's 2017 incentive auction, which reallocated spectrum from television broadcast to mobile broadband.

    According to his BBVA Award citation: “Paul Milgrom has made seminal contributions to an unusually wide range of fields of economics including auctions, market design, contracts and incentives, industrial economics, economics of organizations, finance, and game theory.” As counted by Google Scholar, Milgrom’s books and articles have received more than 80,000 citations.

    Finally, Milgrom has been a successful adviser of graduate students, winning the 2017 H&S Dean's award for Excellence in Graduate Education.

  • Rosamond Naylor

    Rosamond Naylor

    William Wrigley Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Activities:
    My research focuses on the environmental and equity dimensions of intensive food production systems, and the food security dimensions of low-input systems. I have been involved in a number of field-level research projects around the world and have published widely on issues related to climate impacts on agriculture, distributed irrigation systems for diversified cropping, nutrient use and loss in agriculture, biotechnology, aquaculture and livestock production, biofuels development, food price volatility, and food policy analysis.

    Teaching Activities:
    I teach courses on the world food economy, food and security, aquaculture science and policy, human society and environmental change, and food-water-health linkages. These courses are offered to graduate and undergraduate students through the departments of Earth System Science, Economics, History, and International Relations.

    Professional Activities:
    William Wrigley Professor of Earth Science (2015 - Present); Professor in Earth System Science (2009-present); Director, Stanford Center on Food Security and the Environment (2005-2018); Associate Professor of Economics by courtesy (2000-present); William Wrigley Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Woods Institute for the Environment (2007-2015); Trustee, The Nature Conservancy CA program (2012-present); Member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Beijer Institute for Ecological Economics in Stockholm (2011-present), for the Aspen Global Change Institute (2011-present), and for the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (2012-present); Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in Environmental Science and Public Policy (1999); Pew Fellow in Conservation and the Environment (1994). Associate Editor for the Journal on Food Security (2012-present). Editorial board member for Aquaculture-Environment Interactions (2009-present) and Global Food Security (2012-present).

  • Roger Noll

    Roger Noll

    Professor of Economics, Emeritus

    BioRoger G. Noll is professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University. Noll also is a Senior Fellow and member of the Advisory Board at the American Antitrust Institute. Noll received a B.S. with honors in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph. D. in economics from Harvard University. Prior to joining Stanford, Noll was a Senior Economist at the President's Council of Economic Advisers, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Institute Professor of Social Science and Chair of the Division of Humanities and Social Sciences at the California Institute of Technology. At Stanford, Noll served as Associate Dean for Social Sciences in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Public Policy Program, and Senior Fellow in the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research where he also was Director of the Program in Regulatory Policy and Director of the Stanford Center for International Development.

    Noll is the author or co-author of seventeen books and over three hundred articles and reviews. His primary research interests include technology policy; antitrust, regulation and privatization policies in both advanced and developing economies; economic aspects of public law (administrative law, judicial processes, and statutory interpretation); and the economics of sports and entertainment. Among Noll’s published books are Economic Aspects of Television Regulation (1973), Government and the Sports Business (1974), The Technology Pork Barrel (1991), Constitutional Reform in California (1995), Sports, Jobs and Taxes (1997), Challenges to Research Universities (1998), and Economic Reform in India (2013).

    Noll has been a member of the advisory boards of the U.S. Department of Energy, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and National Science Foundation. He also has been a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy of the National Research Council, and of the California Council on Science and Technology.

    Noll has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, the annual book award of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters, the Rhodes Prize for undergraduate education at Stanford, the Distinguished Service Award of the Public Utilities Research Center, the Alfred E. Kahn Distinguished Career Award from the American Antitrust Institute, the Distinguished Member Award from the Transportation and Public Utilities Group of the American Economic Association, Economist of the Year from Global Competition Review, and the American Antitrust Institute award for Distinguished Achievement by an Economist in Antitrust Litigation.

  • Petra Persson

    Petra Persson

    Assistant Professor of Economics
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    BioPetra Persson is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Stanford’s Department of Economics, where she teaches in the PhD program. She is also a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Stanford Center for International Development, and a Research Affiliate at the Centre for Economic Policy Research. Her research agenda centers on social insurance and family structure, and explores the interaction between government-provided insurance and intra-family insurance.

    Petra Persson was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research from 2013 to 2014, and a Predoctoral Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School Women and Public Policy Program from 2012 to 2013. She earned her PhD in Economics from Columbia University in 2013, her MSc in Economics from Stockholm School of Economics in 2006, and her BA in Political Science and Mathematics from Stockholm University in 2005.

  • Luigi Pistaferri

    Luigi Pistaferri

    Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioLuigi Pistaferri is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University, a research fellow of NBER, CEPR and IZA, the "Ralph Landau" Senior Fellow at SIEPR, and one of the co-editors of the American Economic Review. His papers are on the intersection between labor economics and macroeconomics. Pistaferri holds a PhD in Economics from University College, London, and a Doctorate in Economic Sciences from IUN in Naples (Italy), where he was born in 1968. Pistaferri joined Stanford University in 1999 after finishing his PhD and has been a member of the faculty ever since, with the exception of one year sabbatical spent at EIEF in Rome.

  • Joseph Romano

    Joseph Romano

    Professor of Statistics and of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWork in progress is described under "Projects"

  • Maya Rossin-Slater

    Maya Rossin-Slater

    Associate Professor of Health Policy (Health Services Research), Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioMaya Rossin-Slater is an Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford University School of Medicine. She is also a Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic and Policy Research (SIEPR), a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Research Affiliate at the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA). She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University in 2013, and was an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California, Santa Barbara from 2013 to 2017, prior to coming to Stanford. Rossin-Slater’s research includes work in health, public, and labor economics. She focuses on issues in maternal and child well-being, family structure and behavior, and policies targeting disadvantaged populations in the United States and other developed countries. She is the recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and has published articles in a variety of peer-reviewed journals, including the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Journal of Health Economics, Journal of Public Economics, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Gregory Rosston

    Gregory Rosston

    Gordon Cain Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioGreg Rosston is Director of the Public Policy program at Stanford University, the Gordon Cain Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and Professor of Economics (by courtesy). He teaches Economics and Public Policy courses on competition policy and strategy, economic policy analysis, and writing and rhetoric.

    Dr. Rosston served as Deputy Chief Economist at the Federal Communications Commission working on the implementation of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and the design and implementation of the first ever spectrum auctions in the United States. In 2011, he was Senior Economist for Transactions for the Federal Communications Commission for the proposed AT&T – T-Mobile transaction. He served as a member and co-chair of the Department of Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory Committee from 2010 – 2014.

    Dr. Rosston received his Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University and his A.B. with Honors from University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Rosston has written extensively on the application of economics to telecommunications issues and regularly teaches courses on Economic policy focusing on cost-benefit analysis and competition policy. He has advised companies and governments regarding auctions and served as a consultant to various organizations including the World Bank and the Federal Communications Commission, and as a board member and advisor to high technology, financial, and startup companies. He serves as Chair of the Board of the Stanford Federal Credit Union, as a Board member of the Nepal Youth Foundation and as an Advisory Board member of Sustainable Conservation and the Technology Policy Institute.

  • Cristian Javier Santesteban

    Cristian Javier Santesteban

    Lecturer

    BioCristian is an applied industrial organization and antitrust economist with extensive experience across many industries, including semiconductors (CPUs, DRAM), telecom/media (cable TV, wireless phone, satellite TV), commodities (polyurethane foam, flat glass, natural gas, LCDs), food products (milk, mushrooms, tuna fish, soft drinks), medical devices (pulse oximeters, sharps containers), finance (LIBOR, Euribor, Silver Futures), internet marketing, and college sports. He is a Lecturer in the Department of Economics and the President of Red Peak Economics Consulting.

  • John Shoven

    John Shoven

    The Charles Schwab Professor of Economics, Emeritus

    BioJohn B. Shoven is the Trione Director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and the Charles R. Schwab Professor of Economics at Stanford. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He specializes in public finance and corporate finance and has published on Social Security, health economics, corporate and personal taxation, mutual funds, pension plans, economic demography and applied general equilibrium economics. His books include The Real Deal: The History and Future of Social Security, Yale University Press, 1999 and The Evolving Pension System, Brookings Institution Press, 2005. His most recent book is co-authored with former Secretary of State and Treasury George Shultz and deals with both Social Security and health care reform in the U.S. (Putting Our House in Order: A Guide to Social Security and Health Care Reform, WWNorton, 2008). He also recently published a research paper on new ways of measuring age (“New Age Thinking: Alternative Ways of Measuring Age, Their Relationship to Labor Force Participation, Government Policies and GDP,” NBER Working Paper No. 13476. October 2007). His journal publications appear in such places as the American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Perspectives, and the Journal of Public Economics. In total, he has published more than one hundred professional articles and twenty books.

    Professor Shoven is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of the Paul A. Samuelson Award for Outstanding Scholarly Writing on Lifelong Financial Security, and an award winning teacher at Stanford. He received his Ph.D in Economics from Yale University in 1973 and has been associated with Stanford ever since. He was Dean of Humanities and Sciences from 1993 to 1998. He is Chairman of the Board of Board of Cadence Design Systems and serves on the boards of American Century Funds, Exponent, Inc. and Financial Engines, Inc.

  • John Taylor

    John Taylor

    Mary and Robert Raymond Professor, George P. Shultz Senior Fellow of Economics at the Hoover Institution and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioJohn B. Taylor is the Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics at Stanford University and the George P. Shultz Senior Fellow in Economics at the Hoover Institution. He is Director of the Stanford Introductory Economics Center. He formerly served as director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, where he is now a senior fellow.
    Taylor’s academic fields of expertise are macroeconomics, monetary economics, and international economics. He is known for his research on the foundations of modern monetary theory and policy, which has been applied by central banks and financial market analysts around the world. He has an active interest in public policy. He served as senior economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1976 to 1977, as a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1989 to 1991. He was also a member of the Congressional Budget Office’s Panel of Economic Advisers from 1995 to 2001. Taylor served as a member of the California Governor’s Council of Economic Advisors from 1996-98 and 2005-10.
    For four years from 2001 to 2005, Taylor served as Under Secretary of Treasury for International Affairs where he was responsible for currency markets, trade in financial services, foreign investment, international debt and development, and oversight of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. He was also responsible for coordinating financial policy with the G-7 countries, was chair of the OECD working party on international macroeconomics, and was a Member of the Board of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. His book Global Financial Warriors: The Untold Story of International Finance in the Post-9/11 World chronicles his years as head of the international division at Treasury. His book Getting Off Track: How Government Actions and Interventions Caused, Prolonged, and Worsened the Financial Crisis was one of the first on the financial crisis, and he has since followed up with two books on preventing future crises, co-editing The Road ahead for the Fed and Ending Government Bailouts As We Know Them. His latest book is First Principles: Five Keys to Restoring Americas’ Prosperity, winner of the 2012 Hayek Prize.
    In 2010, Taylor received the Bradley Prize from the Bradley Foundation and the Adam Smith Award from the National Association for Business Economics for his work as a researcher, public servant, and teacher. Taylor was awarded the Alexander Hamilton Award for his overall leadership at the U.S. Treasury, the Treasury Distinguished Service Award for designing and implementing the currency reforms in Iraq, and the Medal of the Republic of Uruguay for his work in resolving the 2002 financial crisis. He was awarded the George P. Shultz Distinguished Public Service Award at Stanford, the Hoagland Prize for excellence in undergraduate teaching and the Rhodes Prize for his high teaching ratings in Stanford’s introductory economics course. He also received a Guggenheim Fellowship for his research, and he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society; he formerly served as vice president of the American Economic Association.
    Previously, Taylor held positions of professor of economics at Princeton University and Columbia University. Taylor received a B.A. in economics summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1968 and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University in 1973.

  • Heidi L. Williams

    Heidi L. Williams

    Charles R. Schwab Professor of Economics, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Law

    BioHeidi Williams is the Charles R. Schwab Professor of Economics at Stanford University, and Professor (by courtesy) at Stanford Law School. She is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and is a co-editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives. Her research agenda focuses on investigating the causes and consequences of technological change, with a particular focus on health care markets. Heidi received her AB in mathematics from Dartmouth College in 2003, her MSc in development economics from Oxford University in 2004, and her PhD in economics from Harvard in 2010. She is the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2015) as well as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship (2015), and has also been recognized for her undergraduate teaching, graduate teaching, and graduate advising.

  • Frank Wolak

    Frank Wolak

    Holbrook Working Professor of Price Theory and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Precourt Institute for Energy
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    BioFrank A. Wolak is a Professor in the Department of Economics at Stanford University. His fields of specialization are Industrial Organization and Econometric Theory. His recent work studies methods for introducing competition into infrastructure industries -- telecommunications, electricity, water delivery and postal delivery services -- and on assessing the impacts of these competition policies on consumer and producer welfare. He is the Chairman of the Market Surveillance Committee of the California Independent System Operator for electricity supply industry in California. He is a visiting scholar at University of California Energy Institute and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

    Professor Wolak received his Ph.D. and M.S. from Harvard University and his B.A. from Rice University.

  • Gavin Wright

    Gavin Wright

    William Robertson Coe Professor in American Economic History, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Wright is now studying the economic implications of voting rights and vote suppression in the American South. He is also revisiting the relationship between slavery and Anglo-American capitalism.