School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 344 Results

  • Grant Barber

    Grant Barber

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. Grant Barber is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University. His clinical passion is in the care of patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. After completing his medical training at Harvard Medical School, he completed his training in gastroenterology as well as a Master's degree in clinical research at Stanford. He completed additional training in advanced IBD management at Stanford before joining faculty. His research is focused on male reproductive health in IBD, quality improvement in the provision of IBD care, and economic studies to identify strategies that provide excellent outcomes while being sustainable within the healthcare system. He is an expert in tailoring evidence-based therapies to need of individual people with IBD.

  • Maria Barna

    Maria Barna

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies how intricate control of gene expression and cell signaling is regulated on a minute-by-minute basis to give rise to the remarkable diversity of cell types and tissue morphology that form the living blueprints of developing organisms. Work in the Barna lab is presently split into two main research efforts. The first is investigating ribosome-mediated control of gene expression genome-wide in space and time during cellular differentiation and organismal development. This research is opening a new field of study in which we apply sophisticated mass spectrometry, computational biology, genomics, and developmental genetics, to characterize a ribosome code to gene expression. Our research has shown that not all of the millions of ribosomes within a cell are the same and that ribosome heterogeneity can diversify how genomes are translated into proteomes. In particular, we seek to address whether fundamental aspects of gene regulation are controlled by ribosomes harboring a unique activity or composition that are tuned to translating specific transcripts by virtue of RNA regulatory elements embedded within their 5’UTRs. The second research effort is centered on employing state-of-the-art live cell imaging to visualize cell signaling and cellular control of organogenesis. This research has led to the realization of a novel means of cell-cell communication dependent on a dense network of actin-based cellular extension within developing organs that interconnect and facilitate the precise transmission of molecular information between cells. We apply and create bioengineering tools to manipulate such cellular interactions and signaling in-vivo.

  • Christopher O. Barnes

    Christopher O. Barnes

    Assistant Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in our lab is aimed at defining the structural correlates of broad and potent antibody-mediated neutralization of viruses. We combine biophysical and structural methods (e.g., cryo-EM), protein engineering, and in vivo approaches to understand how enveloped viruses infect host cells and elicit antigen-specific immune responses. We are particularly interested in the co-evolution of HIV-1 and broadly-neutralizing IgG antibodies (bNAbs), which may hold the key to the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. In addition, we are investigating antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 and related zoonotic coronaviruses (CoV), with the related goal of developing broadly-protective immunotherapies and vaccines against variants of concern and emerging CoV threats.

    HIV-1; SARS-CoV-2; coronaviruses; cryo-EM; crystallography; vaccines; directed evolution

  • Leandra A. Barnes, MD

    Leandra A. Barnes, MD

    Instructor, Dermatology

    BioDr. Barnes is a board-certified dermatologist who provides care at Stanford Health Care Dermatology Clinics in Redwood City and Emeryville. She is also an Instructor of Dermatology within the Department of Dermatology at Stanford School of Medicine.

    Dr. Barnes specializes in diagnosing and treating a broad range of skin conditions, including hidradenitis suppurativa, skin cancer, and conditions that disproportionally impact people of color. As Co-Director of the Stanford Medicine Hidradenitis Suppurativa Specialty Clinic, her clinical focus includes maximizing awareness of and care options for this condition. Dr. Barnes is also the Founding Director of the Stanford Medicine Skin of Color Program and Director of Advocacy, Equity, and Inclusion in the Department of Dermatology at Stanford Medicine.

    Dr. Barnes’ clinical research focuses on identifying the underlying mechanisms associated with the onset and progression of hidradenitis suppurativa. These efforts include research on access to care among different patient populations and studies identifying immune-mediated characteristics of the condition. She is also engaged in efforts to promote broader and more effective outreach initiatives to drive melanoma awareness among minority populations and young children.

    Dr. Barnes has published her work in numerous peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, JAMA Dermatology, and the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. She has also been an invited guest speaker at national and international meetings, including those for the Society of Investigative Dermatology and the World Congress of Dermatology.

  • Patrick Barnes

    Patrick Barnes

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdvanced imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, of injury to the developing central nervous system; including fetal, neonatal, infant and young child; and, including nonaccidental injury (e.g. child abuse).

    See Biosketch for details.

  • Ellen Jo Baron

    Ellen Jo Baron

    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNo current scientific activities. I am retired.

  • Richard Baron, MD

    Richard Baron, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Baron is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist in the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic and the Vestibular Balance Disorders Program. He is also clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences and, by courtesy, in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received fellowship training in both headache medicine and otoneurology (dizziness and vestibular disorders) at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He specializes in diagnosing, managing, and treating the many causes of headache, facial pain, and dizziness. To provide the highest level of care, he takes a detailed history, performs a specialized physical exam, and collaborates with colleagues across the Stanford Health Care system. Dr. Baron develops a comprehensive care plan customized for each patient. He specializes in non-medication options, nerve blocks and other advanced treatments, Botox® injections, and the latest headache medications and devices.

    Dr. Baron has a particular interest in the management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), which results from pressure around the brain and causes headaches and problems with vision. He has established a multidisciplinary group of Stanford Health Care doctors to improve and coordinate care for people with IIH. The group includes doctors from several departments, including neuro-ophthalmology, neurosurgery, interventional radiology, and bariatric surgery and medical weight loss. They work together to determine the most effective medical and procedural treatments.

    Dr. Baron also has a strong interest in the evaluation of acute vestibular syndromes and the management of dizziness in the emergency room. He has published in Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, and Translational Behavioral Medicine. He has also written several chapters for the Stanford Neurology Resident Handbook. He has presented his research at conferences throughout the United States, and he is heavily involved with quality improvement projects and educating resident physicians.

    Dr. Baron is a member of the American Headache Society, American Academy of Neurology, Catholic Medical Association, and Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

  • Donald Barr

    Donald Barr

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics), Emeritus

    BioDonald Barr is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Stanford School of Medicine, and Professor by Courtesy in the Graduate School of Education. He teaches in the Undergraduate Program in Human Biology, where he helped to found Human Biology's curriculum in health policy. His research has studied the effect of the organizational structure of the U.S. medical care delivery system on the quality of primary care. He has also studied cultural and linguistic barriers to health care access for low-income patients, and factors associated with higher rates of attrition from pre-medical studies among minority students at Stanford and other universities. The fourth edition of his book, Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing, and Delivery of Health Care in America, was published in 2016. The third edition of his book, Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity and the Social Determinants of Health, was published in 2019. In June 2003 Dr. Barr was awarded the Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contribution to Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. In 2006 he received the Miriam Aaron Roland Prize, which recognizes Stanford faculty who engage and involve students in integrating academic scholarship with significant and meaningful volunteer service to society.

  • Juliana Barr

    Juliana Barr

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) ICU Outcomes Research; 2) Clinical pharmacology of sedative-hypnotic agents in ICU patients.

  • Annelise E. Barron

    Annelise E. Barron

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiophysical mechanisms of host defense peptides (a.k.a. antimicrobial peptides) and their peptoid mimics; also, molecular and cellular biophysics of human innate immune responses.

  • Michele Barry, MD, FACP

    Michele Barry, MD, FACP

    Drs. Ben & A. Jess Shenson Professor, Senior Associate Dean, Global Health, Director, Center for Innovation in Global Health, Professor of Medicine, Senior Fellow at Woods and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAreas of research
    Ethical Aspects of research conducted overseas
    Clinical Tropical Diseases
    Globalization's Impact upon Health Disparities
    Hemorrhagic Viruses

  • Greg Barsh

    Greg Barsh

    Professor of Genetics and of Pediatrics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenetics of color variation

  • Richard Barth

    Richard Barth

    Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMagnetic Resonance Imaging and Sonographic diagnosis of fetal anomalies.
    Focus interest in the diagnosis and conservative (non-surgical and minimal radiation) management of congenital broncho pulmonary malformations.
    Imaging of appendicitis in children.
    Sonography of the pediatric testis.

  • Fiona Barwick, PhD, DBSM

    Fiona Barwick, PhD, DBSM

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Sleep Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests focus on expanding sleep education, improving sleep health, optimizing treatment for circadian rhythm disorders, and adapting treatment for insomnia in populations where developmental, medical, psychiatric and cultural factors intersect.

    Current research projects include developing and piloting integrated protocols for treating sleep problems that co-occur with medical conditions such as chronic pain or POTS. Ongoing collaborations include delivery of a CBTI protocol in Mandarin via telehealth to patients at Chongqing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital in China. Past projects include investigation of the link between RLS and the gut microbiome and a survey of student sleep health.

  • Jennifer Basarab-Tung

    Jennifer Basarab-Tung

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioI enjoy providing anesthesia for a wide variety of patients, procedures, and conditions. My practice sites include the Stanford Main Operating Room, Ambulatory Surgical Center, Labor and Delivery, Outpatient Surgical Center in Redwood City, Cancer Center South Bay in Los Gatos, and Reproductive Endocrinology/Infertility in Sunnyvale. Some of my clinical areas of focus include thoracic surgery and obstetrics. I am also involved in resident education and help manage the resident lecture curriculum.

  • Preetha Basaviah, M.D.

    Preetha Basaviah, M.D.

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical education, preparation for clerkship curricula and hospital medicine.

  • Marina Basina

    Marina Basina

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDiabetes type I and type II, insulin pump therapy, glucose sensor technology, insulin resistance, PCOS, thyroid disorders

  • Dorsey Bass

    Dorsey Bass

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is interested in the pathophysiology, immunology, and epidemiology of viral gastroenteritis.

  • Hannah Bassett

    Hannah Bassett

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUnderstanding how to implement real time patient-centered healthcare cost transparency in the acute care setting and how this transparency effects patient and system-level outcomes.

    Understanding how to best decrease unnecessary variation in clinical care through implementation of clinical effectiveness tools.

  • Michael Bassik

    Michael Bassik

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are an interdisciplinary lab focused on two major areas:(1) we seek to understand mechanisms of cancer growth and drug resistance in order to find new therapeutic targets(2) we study mechanisms by which macrophages and other cells take up diverse materials by endocytosis and phagocytosis; these substrates range from bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells to drugs and protein toxins. To accomplish these goals, we develop and use new technologies for high-throughput functional genomics.

  • Brian T. Bateman

    Brian T. Bateman

    Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioBrian T. Bateman, MD, MSc is the Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine Endowed Professor and Chair of the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine.

    Before coming to Stanford, Dr. Bateman served as the Vice Chair for Faculty Development and Chief of the Division of Obstetric Anesthesia in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School and as Co-Director of the Harvard Program on Perinatal and Pediatric Pharmacoepidemiology in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

    Dr. Bateman’s scholarship focuses on the study of medication safety in pregnancy and on predictors and management of maternal morbidity. To address questions in these areas, Dr. Bateman and collaborators at Harvard helped pioneer the use of advanced epidemiological techniques applied to large, routinely collected healthcare utilization data. This research has been funded by multiple R01 grants from the NIH and by grants from the FDA and has been published in leading clinical journals including NEJM, JAMA, BMJ, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA Pediatrics, JAMA Psychiatry, and Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Bateman’s bibliography contains over 300 publications. This research is frequently cited in clinical reviews and guidelines and has prompted both the FDA and EMA to make labelling changes to medications regarding use in pregnancy. Dr. Bateman is also a founding member of the International Pregnancy Safety Study Consortium (InPress) which is a collaborative effort between investigators from the US and each of the five Nordic countries to pool data for studies evaluating the safety of medications.

    Dr. Bateman currently serves as Chairperson of FDA’s Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee after having previously served a 4-year term (2015-2019) as a voting member of this Committee. He was a technical advisor for the recent revision of the Joint Commission’s pain management standards. He has served on expert panels and workshops sponsored by the National Academy of Medicine, the FDA, the NIH, the CDC, and the Department of Health and Human Services, and on multiple grant review committees for the NIH and other funders. He is an Editor for the journal, Anesthesiology, and the textbook, Chestnut’s Obstetric Anesthesia: Principles and Practice.

    Dr. Bateman’s work has been recognized by a number of awards including his selection in 2017 by the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology as the Gerard Ostheimer lecturer and in 2018 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists as the James E. Cottrell Presidential Scholar Awardee, which is given to one clinical-scientist each year within 10 years of initial faculty appointment for accomplishment in research.

    Faculty development and mentorship has been a central focus of Dr. Bateman’s career. He has mentored numerous trainees who have gone on to outstanding academic careers. Throughout his career, he has worked particularly hard to advance the careers of women and underrepresented minorities and to create environments where everyone is welcomed and has an opportunity to advance.

    Dr. Bateman is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate Yale College and received his MD from Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, where he was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha and was awarded the Janeway Prize for the highest achievements and abilities in the graduating class. He completed an internship in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and residency and chief residency in anesthesiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He completed a Masters in Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health.

  • Glaivy Batsuli, MD

    Glaivy Batsuli, MD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHemophilia is a rare inherited X-linked bleeding disorder characterized by the deficiency of blood clotting proteins factor VIII or factor IX. These individuals are at risk for spontaneous bleeds and trauma or surgery-induced bleeding. There have been remarkable advancements in the management of hemophilia to prevent these bleeding episodes and improve quality of life. However, the presence of neutralizing antibodies, called inhibitors, still dictates access to novel therapies such as factor replacement for bleed management and now FDA-approved gene therapies. The Batsuli Lab is focused on elucidating mechanisms of the immune response to blood coagulation proteins in bleeding disorders in order to develop strategies and therapeutics for inhibitor prevention and tolerance induction.

    Dr. Batsuli's clinical research interests also include clinical trial participation for novel therapeutics & interventions in bleeding disorders such as hemophilia and von Willebrand disease in addition to coagulation issues & outcomes in ultra-rare bleeding disorders and sickle cell disease.

  • Eugene Bauer

    Eugene Bauer

    Lucy Becker Professor in Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDefining the role of matrix metalloproteinases in connective tissue remodeling of the skin. Defining the macromolecular structures of the cutaneous basement membrane zone. Developing methods for delivery of extracutaneous gene therapy in epidermolysis bullosa.

  • Fiona Baumer

    Fiona Baumer

    Assistant Professor of Neurology (Pediatric Neurology) and of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCauses of Disturbed Cognition in Pediatric Epilepsy

  • Tina Baykaner

    Tina Baykaner

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioTina Baykaner is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Electrophysiology. Following internal medicine residency, cardiovascular medicine and advanced heart failure fellowship trainings at University of California, San Diego and electrophysiology fellowship at Stanford University, Dr. Baykaner joined Stanford University faculty in 2018. She has published over 200 papers, book chapters and abstracts including over 80 original peer-reviewed articles, and delivered over 40 invited presentations in national and international meetings. She serves as associate editor, section editor and editorial board member of four electrophysiology journals.

    Dr. Baykaner’s current research interests include outcomes research, epidemiology and mechanisms of rhythm disorders. She is currently funded by the National Institutes of Health to study patient related outcomes regarding atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. She received prior research funding from American Heart Association and Heart Rhythm Society. Dr. Baykaner's clinical practice focuses on ablation of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, SVTs, inappropriate sinus tachycardia management, device implantation and device extraction.

    Dr. Baykaner is an active member of American Heart Association (AHA), American College of Cardiology (ACC), Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and European Society of Cardiology (ESC). She serves as an elected member of the Communications Committee for HRS, and previously served as an elected member of the ACC Task Force ICD research committee. She also served in the Organizing Committee for Stanford Cardiovascular Institute Annual Postdoctoral Research Meeting in 2017 and 2018 and for Early Career related sessions for HRS Scientific Sessions in 2019 and 2020.

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor, Professor of Urology, of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunction of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Dr. Gregory Bean

    Dr. Gregory Bean

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Bean is an Assistant Professor who specializes in breast pathology. His research interests include molecular characterization of breast cancer subtypes and precursors. He is also involved with the training of residents and fellows on the breast service.

  • Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Christopher Beaulieu M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformatics and image processing techniques that provide infrastructure for diagnosis in musculoskeletal imaging. Decision support for improving accuracy of bone tumor diagnosis. Improved methods for MRI in the musculoskeletal system.

  • Nataly Beck, MD

    Nataly Beck, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioAs co-founder and co-director of La Clínica Latina, Dr. Nataly Beck is a psychiatrist who is passionate about providing culturally sensitive and compassionate care to patients, especially to those from the Latino community. Originally from Lima, Peru, she immigrated to the US with her family at a young age. She graduated from Yale School of Medicine and completed her psychiatry residency at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. After her first year as an attending at Yale, she began her work at Stanford where she worked in the INSPIRE Clinic for individuals experiencing psychosis and then co-founded La Clínica Latina. She loves the Bay Area and her interests include salsa dancing, playing piano, and spending time with her family.

  • Hans-Christoph Becker, MD, FSABI, FSCCT

    Hans-Christoph Becker, MD, FSABI, FSCCT

    Clinical Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMyocardial bridges (MB) with associated upfront atherosclerotic lesions are common findings on coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Abnormal septal wall motion in exercise echocardiography (EE) may to be associated with MB. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is considered the gold standard for the detection of MB. We investigate whether CTA is comparable to IVUS for the assessment of MB and upstream plaques in symptomatic patients with suspicion for MB raised by EE.