School of Medicine


Showing 201-220 of 220 Results

  • Carolina V. Guimaraes

    Carolina V. Guimaraes

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFetal Neuro Imaging
    Pediatric Neuroradiology

  • Vanessa Gulla

    Vanessa Gulla

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Urology

    BioDr. Gulla is a board-certified urologist with fellowship training in endourology. She is a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Urology.

    For each patient, she develops a comprehensive, compassionate care plan customized to individual needs. Her goal is to help each patient achieve the best possible health and quality of life.

    Dr. Gulla performs the complete spectrum of diagnostic and treatment procedures for urological conditions. She treats disorders including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), blood in urine, kidney stones, male and female voiding dysfunction, neurogenic bladder, prostate cancer, and over active bladder.

    She excels at ureteroscopy and cystoscopy (examination of the bladder and urinary tract with a scope), endourology (minimally invasive treatment of kidney stones), laser therapy, ultrasound-guided diagnosis and treatment, urodynamic testing, and other techniques.

    To help advance her field, Dr. Gulla has conducted research. Among the topics she has investigated are voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) testing in children for bladder and urethral abnormalities and for conditions that can lead to kidney infections.

    She has presented her research findings at the national meeting of the American Urologic Association. She also has published papers in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons and elsewhere.

    She is a member of the American Urologic Association.

  • Saad Ahmad Gulzar

    Saad Ahmad Gulzar

    Assistant Professor of Political Science
    On Leave from 10/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    BioI am an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. My research asks under what conditions can representative government – one that provides equality of voice and influence – improve people’s lives?

    Focusing on South Asia, I pose two broad sets of questions:
    1. Does representative government improve redistribution at the cost of policy efficiency? My work shows that broadening political representation can redistribute welfare towards marginalized communities without incurring efficiency costs. I argue that taking electoral incentives seriously holds the key to making politics work for development.
    2. How can societies transition towards more representative government? I examine long-term historical processes of transitions and their policy consequences. I also study how barriers that prevent broader political participation can be overcome both at the individual and organizational levels. My work shows that politics can be made more inclusive and that doing so can better align policy outcomes with the preferences of people.

    I work closely with politicians, political parties, bureaucrats, and government agencies in Pakistan, India, and Nepal, and strive to make these collaborations meaningful for research and policy. My work has been published in the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Politics, the Journal of Development Economics, and the Journal of the European Economic Association.

    I received my Ph.D. in Political Science at New York University in 2017, where my work received the Best Dissertation Award from the American Political Science Association’s Experiments Section.

    Please visit my website for my cv and research: saadgulzar.com

  • H. Henry Guo, MD, PhD

    H. Henry Guo, MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests3D printing of lung
    Quality assurance of ultralow dose CT scans
    Post radiation treatment changes of lung tumors
    CT features as predictor of cardiovascular disease
    FDG uptake in lung diseases

  • Neel K. Gupta

    Neel K. Gupta

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have specific interest in the pathobiology and management of individuals with AIDS-related and primary central nervous system lymphomas.

  • Tanya Gupta, MD

    Tanya Gupta, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Gupta is a medical oncologist in the Stanford University Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology. In her clinical practice and research, she is dedicated to advancing the understanding and management of breast cancer.

    She is a recent recipient of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/Conquer Cancer 2020 Bonadonna Breast Cancer Research Grant. This grant supports her work as the co-investigator of a clinical trial evaluating the ctDNA status changes during adjuvant treatment of patients with early-stage triple-negative breast cancer who do not respond completely to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Dr. Gupta was a member of the combined bachelors/MD program at the University of California – San Diego. She graduated summa cum laude and was inducted into the Gold Humanism in Medicine Honor Society. She completed internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Stanford, during which time she was a recipient of the Julian Wolfsohn Award for clinical achievements in Internal Medicine and was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. She then served as a Chief Resident and Clinical Instructor in Internal Medicine. Subsequently, she stayed on at Stanford for fellowship training in Hematology and Medical Oncology.

  • Brooke Gurland, MD, FACS

    Brooke Gurland, MD, FACS

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    BioPelvic floor and functional bowel disorders refer to a series of symptoms and anatomic findings that effect men and women of all ages. These may include: constipation, difficult evacuation, fecal incontinence, irritable bowel disorders, diarrhea, pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and sexual dysfunction and pain. Although not life threatening, these disorders can severely affect quality of life and individual performance.

    Over the past two decades I have dedicated my career to working with other specialists for comprehensive care for individuals with pelvic floor disorders. In July 2017, I joined The Department of Surgery, Division of Colorectal Surgery at Stanford University as the Medical Director of the Pelvic Health Center. I previously spent the prior decade at Cleveland Clinic running a multidisciplinary clinic and performing over 200 combined procedures in conjunction with colleagues in urology and urogynecology. We developed a robotic surgical approach to woman with vaginal and rectal prolapse and performed many surgeries to repair intestinal and rectal fistula (abnormal communications between the intestine and vagina).

    Prior to that I established a Pelvic Floor Center at Maimonides Medical Center received a Jahnigan Career Development Award looking at multicompartment prolapse in elderly women. In addition to performing surgery and teaching throughout my career, I have maintained a commitment to long-term follow up of patients after surgery.
    Although my training and focus is around surgical techniques and solutions for anorectal disorders and pelvic health, I believe that prevention, non-surgical alternatives, diet, exercise, and behavior management are vitally important to patient success.

    One of my many goals is to educate patients, health care providers, and trainees about pelvic floor disorders.
    When I am not at work I enjoy quality time with my three teenagers, dog, friends and I practice yoga.

  • Geoffrey Gurtner

    Geoffrey Gurtner

    Johnson & Johnson Distinguished Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeoffrey Gurtner's Lab is interested in understanding the mecahnism of new blood vessel growth following injury and how pathways of tissue regeneration and fibrosis interact in wound healing.