School of Medicine


Showing 1-100 of 118 Results

  • Michael Salerno

    Michael Salerno

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging)

    BioDr. Salerno completed his BS in Biological Engineering at Cornell University, and his MD and PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program. He then completed the American Board of Internal Medicine Research Pathway with an Internal Medicine residency at Stanford University, and his general cardiology fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. During his time at Duke he completed a dedicated year in cardiovascular MRI at the Duke Cardiovascular MR Imaging Center. He returned to UVA in 2008 to complete a 2-year advanced cardiovascular imaging fellowship where he trained in CMR and cardiovascular CTA. He achieved COCATS Level III training in all cardiovascular imaging modalities (Echo, Nuclear, CMR, CCT), and is board certified in Echocardiography and Nuclear Cardiology. He served as faculty at UVA in Cardiology, Radiology, and Biomedical Engineering from 2010-2021 where he was the Director of Cardiac MRI and the Medical Director of Echocardiography, before returning to Stanford.

    His research involves the development and evaluation of novel MRI pulse sequences and techniques to improve the clinical utility of CMR imaging. The current focus of the research is on quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging, quantitative imaging of myocardial fibrosis, rapid free-breathing and self-gated imaging, and deep learning for image reconstruction and post-processing. His laboratory includes undergraduate and graduate engineering students as well as clinical cardiovascular imaging fellows to bring new advances into clinical practice. Dr. Salerno has been in the field of MRI for 25 years and holds multiple patents related to the development and application of novel pulse sequences for MRI. He has received numerous research awards, and has published extensively in the areas of MRI, cardiovascular MRI and multi-modality cardiovascular imaging. His research has been supported by the AHA and the National Institutes of health. He is a deputy editor for JACC Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Outside of work, Dr. Salerno enjoys sailing, rock climbing, skiing, running, biking, hiking, and spending time with his wife Cherie, and his two boys Christopher and Joseph.

  • Karim Sallam, MD

    Karim Sallam, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioKarim Sallam, MD, is trained in Cardiovascular Medicine and Advanced Heart Failure.

  • Giselle (Ghazal) Salmasi, MD

    Giselle (Ghazal) Salmasi, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    BioDr. Salmasi is a board-certified, fellowship-trained hematologist. She treats patients in the Hematology Program and the Hematologic Cancer Program at Stanford Health Care. Dr. Salmasi is the associate clinical chief for classical hematology. She is also a clinical associate professor in the Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She treats a wide range of blood disorders and blood cancers. Her clinical/research interests include immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA). Dr. Salmasi understands that patients need social and emotional support along with medical care. She founded the earliest adolescent and young adult survivorship support groups in Santa Cruz, California, and Toronto, Canada. Dr. Salmasi is also dedicated to training future doctors in providing excellent hematologic care.

    Dr. Salmasi was the medical co-investigator for a national phase 3 clinical trial of endovascular therapy for treating chronic venous thrombosis.

    Her research has appeared in the Leukemia & Lymphoma journal and the Transfusion and Apheresis Science journal. Dr. Salmasi’s publications include articles and a chapter about lymphoma. She has also reviewed articles for the Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation journal and the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

    Dr. Salmasi is a member of the American Society of Hematology.

  • Alexander Tarlochan Singh Sandhu

    Alexander Tarlochan Singh Sandhu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioAlex Sandhu, MD, MS is a cardiologist with a special interest in the care of patients with advanced heart failure. He graduated from the seven-year combined BA-MD program at Northwestern with a focus on economics and mathematics. He completed an internal medicine residency at Stanford University, spending 16 weeks at Makerere Hospital in Uganda as part of the Global Health track. He subsequently earned a Masters in Health Services Research at Stanford while acting as a fellow in health services research at the Palo Alto VA and Stanford's Center for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research. Next, he completed fellowships in cardiology and advanced heart failure and transplant at Stanford before joining the faculty.

    Alex is now an active clinician and heart failure researcher who focuses on health economics, the implementation of high-value care strategies, comparative effectiveness, and innovative clinical trial design. He is passionate about patient care and finding ways to bring meaningful improvements to patients’ lives. He is involved in several clinical trials including the K-23 funded PRO-HF (patient centered quality of life assessments), DOT-HF (mobile device based implementation trial), and a CAC notification pilot trial (patient centered coronary artery calcification notification).

    In his free time, he enjoys playing soccer as well as entertaining and being entertained by his joyful sons, Kyle and Tyler.

  • Ryan Sandoval, M.D.

    Ryan Sandoval, M.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Sandoval is a board-certified cardiologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He completed his residency at the University of Texas at Austin, where he continued on as chief resident before going on to complete his fellowship in cardiovascular disease at the Medical University of South Carolina. Prior to his residency, he completed a research fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

    His clinical interests include preventive cardiology and management of heart failure. He is particularly focused on treating patients with the complex clinical syndrome of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF).

    His interest in preventive cardiology grew through his participation in clinics for the uninsured and underinsured during his training. These experiences fostered his passion for understanding and addressing health care disparities. He is deeply committed to providing exceptional patient care with a personalized approach to treatment and improving the lives of his patients.

    He is a member of the American College of Cardiology.

  • Rebecca Sands

    Rebecca Sands

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sands currently serves as the Clinical Section Chief of Palliative Care at Stanford University. She graduated from Franklin & Marshall College in 2001 with a BA in Chemistry. She then attended Midwestern University, Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine from 2002-2006. She completed a residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at Cambridge Health Alliance in Cambridge, MA and went on to complete her Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM) fellowship at the Harvard combined program at Massachusetts General Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute in 2011. She spent 8 years at the University of Pittsburgh where she served as core teaching faculty and the HPM Fellowship Program Director. Her clinical work has focused on the intersection of oncology and palliative care. Her primary interests are in mentorship and the advancement of palliative care within the structure of academic medicine including ambulatory practice. She has a particular focus on resiliency skill development for trainees, staff, and faculty as well a commitment to the innovation of ways to create meaning in our everyday lives as health care professionals.

  • Christine Santiago

    Christine Santiago

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    BioDr. Christine Santiago is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Stanford Division of Hospital Medicine with a deep commitment to improving healthcare access and equity. Dr. Santiago earned her M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School graduating cum laude and completed an M.P.H. in Health Policy and Management at the University of California Berkeley.

    Throughout her career, Dr. Santiago has actively engaged in various leadership roles and initiatives, such as co-founding the Stanford Health Equity, Advocacy and Research Program (Stanford HEARs), a resident-led program aimed at addressing healthcare disparities. She also had the privilege of serving as Chief Resident, where she supported educational activities and mentored fellow residents.

    With a strong focus on diversity and inclusion, Dr. Santiago has been involved in multiple professional associations, including the American College of Physicians and the California Medical Association, to promote diversity within healthcare. Additionally, she has contributed to curriculum development, mentorship programs, and research activities, all in the pursuit of advancing healthcare, improving patient outcomes and creating a more equitable healthcare system for all patients.

  • Anuja Anand Sathe

    Anuja Anand Sathe

    Instructor, Medicine - Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in understanding the determinants of therapeutic resistance in cancer. I investigate the composition of the tumor microenvironment and adaptive responses to therapy using single-cell and spatial approaches.

  • Amelia Sattler, MD

    Amelia Sattler, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrently working on projects identifying effective use of actual patient encounters in undergraduate medical education. Specifically interested in the role of actual patient encounters in the training of shared decision making. Also interested in medical student empathy and physician wellness.

    Also working on many different projects in the realm of quality improvement and population health in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health.

  • Thomas Robert Savage

    Thomas Robert Savage

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine
    Masters Student in Biomedical Informatics, admitted Autumn 2022

    BioDr Thomas Savage is a Hospitalist at Stanford University Hospital. He teaches residents and medical students on the general medicine service as well as covers the oncology, cardiology and transplant services as a nocturnist. His research interests include artificial intelligence applications to medicine and wearable medical devices.

  • John Scandling

    John Scandling

    Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTolerance induction in clinical kidney transplantation

  • Lidia Schapira

    Lidia Schapira

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Schapira is a medical oncologist with clinical expertise in the treatment of breast cancer. As the inaugural Director of Stanford's Cancer Survivorship Program, she has developed a thriving research and clinical program focused on optimizing health outcomes for people living with and beyond cancer. Dr. Schapira is interested in training future generations of physician-scientists as well as the broader community of practicing physicians through the design of innovative educational programs. Dr. Schapira's advocacy for people with cancer led to her appointment as Editor-in-Chief of the American Society of Clinical Oncology's website for the public,Cancer.Net, a position she held from 2015 until-2021. She served on the Board of Directors of the American Psychosocial Oncology Society and as Chair of the Psychosocial Interest Group of the Multinational Society for Supportive Care in Cancer. Dr. Schapira is particularily committed to reducing inequities in cancer outcomes and improve access to cancer care and cancer clinical trials. Dr. Schapira has published numerous manuscripts, lectures both nationally and internationally on issues of cancer survivorship and served as Associate Editor of the narrative section, Art of Oncology, for the Journal of Clinical Oncology from 2013 until 2023.

  • Erika Schillinger

    Erika Schillinger

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy passion is clinical skills education: the patient's experience of health and healthcare, doctor-patient communication, professionalism and physical exam. I am focused on curriculum design and innovation, having helped develop the Continuity of Care Clerkship, the clinical skills curriculum in Practice of Medicine, the Family Medicine core clerkship, outpatient faculty development modules and the SHIELD course (Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive).

  • Rebecca Pearl Schisler

    Rebecca Pearl Schisler

    Academic Staff - Hourly - CSL, Medicine

    BioDirector of SHEFA Initiative for Health & Wellbeing

    Rebecca is an artist, devoted mindfulness practitioner, and student rabbi at ALEPH Ordination Programs. She teaches meditation classes and retreats with Or HaLev, Awakened Heart Project, Institute for Jewish Spirituality, and Orot, and recently co-authored a new curriculum integrating Social/Emotional Learning and Jewish wisdom on Constructive Conflict for high schools with the Pardes Institute in Jerusalem. Rebecca also teaches yoga and has guided young people through nature-based rites-of-passage as a lead facilitator with Wilderness Torah. Originally from a small town in Texas, Rebecca has lived in the Bay Area for many years and is thrilled to bring her passion for holistic, integrative & creative approaches to spirituality, education & wellness to the SHEFA initiative at Hillel at Stanford.

  • Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research continues to be in the field of echocardiography. Several areas of research are currently being pursued.

  • Gary Schoolnik

    Gary Schoolnik

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructure-function analysis of bacterial adhesion proteins and toxins; design and synthesis of synthetic antigens; immunobiology of human papillomaviruses

  • John S. Schroeder, MD

    John S. Schroeder, MD

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine (Cardiovascular), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Clinical Pharmocology of Cardiovascular Drugs
    (a) Calcium Channel Blockers
    (b) Agents for Heart Failure
    (c) Anti-atherosclerotic Effects of Cardiovascular Drugs, e.g. Calcium Channel Blockers

    2. Cardiac Transplantation/Congestive Heart Failure

    3. Coronary Artery Spasm

  • Joseph Schroers-Martin

    Joseph Schroers-Martin

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical heme/onc focused on molecular cancer diagnostics and novel biomarkers.

  • Kevin Schulman

    Kevin Schulman

    Professor of Medicine (Hospital Medicine), by courtesy, of Health Policy and of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business

    BioDr. Schulman is a Professor of Medicine, Clinical Excellence Research Center (CERC) at the Stanford University School of Medicine, and, by courtesy, Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. He is the Faculty Director of Stanford’s new applied master's degree program, the Master of Science in Clinical Informatics Management program.

    Dr. Schulman is a health economist/health services researcher working at the intersection of business, medicine and technology. With over 500 publications, he has had a broad impact on several areas of health policy (Scopus h-index=81). His research has appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and Health Affairs. He is the editor-in-chief of Health Management, Policy and Innovation (www.HMPI.Org), and Senior Associate Editor of Health Service Research (HSR).

    He is a graduate of Dartmouth College, the New York University School of Medicine, and The Wharton Health Care Management Program.

  • Jake Scott

    Jake Scott

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Jake Scott is a board-certified infectious diseases specialist. He provides general infectious diseases care in the inpatient and outpatient settings and his special interests include COVID-19, coccidiomycosis, multidrug-resistant organisms, HIV, and HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis. He works with patients from diverse backgrounds to provide compassionate, high-quality care aligned with their needs.

    Dr. Scott was born and raised in the Bay Area and was inspired to pursue a career in medicine after working as an HIV test counselor in San Francisco. He studied literature and creative writing in college and values the narrative aspect of medicine and the importance of drawing out the story behind the diagnosis.

    One of Dr. Scott’s passions is teaching. He regularly works with Stanford residents and students and has lectured on various infectious disease-related topics, such as COVID-19, fever of unknown origin, and the dangers of antibiotic overuse, especially as it contributes to the rising threat of multidrug-resistant infections. He is also committed to expanding awareness of infectious diseases outside of the hospital and university through public presentations in the community and media interviews.
    He is the medical director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare in Pleasanton and is a member of the Infection Control Committee and the Stanford Vaccine Clinical Advisory Committee.

    In his spare time, Dr. Scott enjoys rock climbing, hiking, and spending time with his wife and two young children.

  • Katharine Sears Edwards

    Katharine Sears Edwards

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPotential impact of brief behavioral interventions to improve adjustment, coping, medical adherence, and cardiovascular health among cardiac patients.

    Psychosocial challenges of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD).

    Assessment and training in evidence-based psychological therapies.

  • Rebecca Seekamp, MD

    Rebecca Seekamp, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterested in complementary/alternative medicine, international health, international adoption medicine and providing full spectrum health care.

  • Niraj Sehgal

    Niraj Sehgal

    Clinical Professor, Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsQuality Improvement & Patient Safety, Teamwork & Communication, Leadership
    Development, Organizational Culture & Change

  • Deborah Sellmeyer

    Deborah Sellmeyer

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    BioDr. Sellmeyer is an internationally recognized expert in Metabolic Bone Disease. She is a renowned clinician who joined the Stanford faculty in 2018 as a Professor of Medicine. She has been recognized for her clinical excellence with induction into the Miller Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence while she was at Johns Hopkins. In addition to her clinical expertise, Dr. Sellmeyer maintains a research program that centers on the effect of nutrition and environmental factors on skeletal metabolism which she has investigated through both smaller CRC-based trials and large multi-center trials. Studies she has conducted have investigated the role of dietary sodium chloride, source of dietary protein (animal, vegetable, dairy, soy), role of dietary potassium and alkaline potassium salts, targeted thoracic exercises on kyphosis, whether structured exercise can prevent bone loss in premenopausal women treated for breast cancer, and studies validating nutritional assessment questionnaires. Her expertise as a clinical researcher has enabled development of a multi-disciplinary translational research team including basic scientists in the orthopedic department, junior faculty members with K grant funding, and basic scientists in the endocrine division to develop translational projects studying the effects of osteoporosis medications on basic elements of skeletal biology utilizing bone biopsies from treated individuals as well as clinical trials of novel therapies for rare bone disorders. Dr. Sellmeyer also is a esteemed educator, having received multiple teaching awards.

  • Robert W. Shafer

    Robert W. Shafer

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pathology
    On Leave from 05/01/2024 To 10/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group’s research is on the mechanisms and consequences of virus evolution with a focus on HIV therapy and drug resistance. We maintain a public HIV drug resistance database (http://hivdb.stanford.edu) as a resource for HIV drug resistance surveillance, interpreting HIV drug resistance tests, and HIV drug development. Our paramount goal is to inform HIV treatment and prevention policies by identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  • Atulkumar T. Shah, MD

    Atulkumar T. Shah, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. Shah is a board-certified, fellowship-trained gastroenterologist with Stanford Health Care’s Digestive Health program. He is a clinical associate professor of medicine in the division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Shah treats all gastrointestinal and liver conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), colon polyps, hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. He has a special interest in the increasingly prevalent fatty liver disease, which allows him to work closely with patients to educate them about symptom management and making lifestyle changes that will improve their health and wellbeing.

    Dr. Shah treats all gastrointestinal and liver conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), colon polyps, hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. He has a special interest in the increasingly prevalent fatty liver disease, which allows him to work closely with patients to educate them about symptom management and making lifestyle changes that will improve their health and wellbeing.

    After more than two decades of practice, Dr. Shah added training in liver transplant to expand his knowledge of liver disease and offer his patients a “one-stop” resource for truly comprehensive care.

    Dr. Shah is a member of the American College of Gastroenterology, American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, and American Association for the Study of Liver Disease.

    Among Dr. Shah’s current research interests is the development of an algorithm assessing the impact of gastrointestinal disease management on readmission rates.

    Dr. Shah brings a personalized approach to working with patients and to teaching the next generation of physician scientists the classic skills of careful listening and patient examination. Throughout his career, he has emphasized the fundamental importance of balancing scientific expertise with empathy and compassion.

    As a volunteer with the non-profit organization Health Volunteers Overseas, Dr. Shah travels around the world to train physicians about liver disease management and treatment. He is director of the HVO site in Bangalore, India.

  • Mamta Madhav Shah, MD

    Mamta Madhav Shah, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Nephrology

    BioDr. Shah is a board-certified, fellowship-trained nephrologist and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She provides care for patients with a variety of kidney-related conditions, with a special interest in management of kidney stones and related conditions. Her goal is to collaborate with each patient to develop a personalized and comprehensive care plan. She has given several talks on kidney stones to trainees and peers. Dr. Shah previously served as medical director of one of the dialysis clinics at University of Connecticut Health Center and helped run the plasmapheresis treatments.

    Some of Dr. Shah’s recent research is focused on efforts to prevent filter failure when performing membrane-based therapeutic plasma exchange—a blood purification treatment for removing large molecular weight substances from plasma.

    Dr. Shah’s work has been published in the Journal of Onco-Nephrology, Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis, and Connecticut Medicine. She has presented to her peers at national and regional meetings of the American Society of Nephrology, the National Kidney Foundation, and the American College of Physicians, Connecticut Chapter.

    Dr. Shah is a member of the American Society of Nephrology. She has a keen interest in education of trainees including medical students, residents and fellows; and served as core faculty of the Nephrology Fellowship at the University of Connecticut Health Center.

    She is fluent in Hindi and Gujarati. Outside of work she enjoys traveling and spending time with her husband and daughter.

  • Neha Shah

    Neha Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioDr Shah's clinical and research interests lie in Integrative Rheumatology, healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole patient, including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapies, including those outside the realm of allopathic medicine. Specifically, she is interested in exploring the impact of diet/nutrition/botanicals on inflammation as it pertains to rheumatic diseases such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriatic arthritis and other autoimmune conditions, as well as studying the impact of other lifestyle approaches such as mindful meditation, sleep, yoga, stress reduction, etc. on disease burden and quality of life of patients with rheumatic diseases. She boarded in Lifestyle Medicine and has advanced training in Functional Medicine. Dr Shah is currently pursuing additional training in Ayurvedic Medicine.

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system.

  • Nirav R. Shah, MD, MPH

    Nirav R. Shah, MD, MPH

    Adjunct Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioNirav R. Shah, MD, MPH, is Senior Scholar at Stanford University’s School of Medicine. He is a distinguished healthcare leader with experience as an operator, scientist, innovator, and regulator. His expertise spans public health, public and private health insurance, and clinical operations across the continuum of care. At Stanford, Dr. Shah conducts research on improving healthcare quality and safety while lowering cost, driving adoption of digital technologies, and quantitatively evaluating the resulting value for US and international health care systems. Dr. Shah is Board-certified in Internal Medicine and is a graduate of Harvard College and Yale School of Medicine. He is an Advisor to the CDC Director, Senior Fellow of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), independent director of STERIS plc [NASDAQ:STE], and trustee of the John A. Hartford Foundation. Previously, he served as Chief Operating Officer of Kaiser Permanente in Southern California, and as Commissioner of the New York State Department of Health.

  • Sumit Shah

    Sumit Shah

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Sumit Shah specializes in the management of advanced urologic malignancies such as prostate, kidney, bladder, and testicular cancers. He also serves as an investigator on numerous clinical trials, with a focus on novel immunotherapy agents. His academic interests also include digital health technologies and novel healthcare delivery services, both in the domestic and international setting. Dr. Shah graduated with distinction in biomedical engineering from Duke University, received his medical doctorate from Stanford University, and Masters in Public Health from Harvard University. He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where he stayed on faculty for one year before returning to Stanford for his fellowship training in medical oncology, where he now serves on the faculty.

  • Shagufta Shaheen

    Shagufta Shaheen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Shaheen specializes in the gastrointestinal malignancies and she has expertise in treating neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Following her fellowship in Hematology and Oncology, Dr Shaheen completed an advanced fellowship in Neuroendocrine tumors from Stanford University. The NET advanced fellowship is first of its kind in United State started under the leadership of Dr Pamela Kunz who is the founding Director of the Stanford Neuroendocrine Tumor Program established in 2015. After completing her advanced fellowship, Dr Shaheen joined Stanford Oncology division as Clinical Assistant Professor. Dr Shaheen is involved in further developing the neuroendocrine oncology program at Stanford which serves as a centre of excellence in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. Dr Shaheen is actively involved in clinical research and clinical trials. Dr Shaheen is also involved in taking care of patients admitted to the oncology service as well as resident and fellow teaching.

  • Husham Sharifi

    Husham Sharifi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    BioI am a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine in Stanford University School of Medicine. My practice includes a Lung Graft-versus-Host-Disease (GVHD) Clinic for patients with pulmonary complications after life-saving hematopoietic cell transplant. Our clinic is part of a Lung GVHD Consortium comprising Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Michigan, and MD Anderson Cancer Center. In this context I am the site co-Principal Investigator for two national clinical trials through the Lung GVHD Consortium that are funded by the National Institutes of Health, one studying the association of respiratory viruses with Lung GVHD and a second studying the diagnostic and prognostic utility of quantitative CT scans of the chest for Lung GVHD. Separately, I see patients with pulmonary complications of infection from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), including "Long COVID". I also see patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). My research applies advanced computational analysis to clinical metadata and quantitative imaging data, domains that draw on my graduate level education and postdoctoral training in engineering and bioinformatics. I strive to fuse detailed, communicative patient care with the advances of data science in medicine that I research and study.

  • Rahul P Sharma, MBBS, FRACP

    Rahul P Sharma, MBBS, FRACP

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranscatheter valve therapies, CT valve imaging, AI and device innovation

  • Christopher Sharp, MD

    Christopher Sharp, MD

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Informatics
    Clinical Education
    Teaching Physical Examination
    Quality Improvement
    Preventive Medicine

  • Jonathan Shaw

    Jonathan Shaw

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary care, psycho-social determinants of health & care, maternal-child health

  • Meera Sheffrin

    Meera Sheffrin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeriatric education
    Implementation and evaluation of home-based care
    Improving care for older adults with dementia

  • Bansari Sureshchandra Sheth

    Bansari Sureshchandra Sheth

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sheth is originally from southern California, but has progressively moved up the coast over the last few years, now making the Bay Area her wonderful new home. Board certified in Family Medicine, she had comprehensive training during residency. She has a variety of special interests, including pediatric illnesses, women’s health, diabetes care including lifestyle management, as well as Hepatitis C treatment. She believes in empowering her patients, working together with them as a team. In her free time, Dr. Sheth enjoys yoga, going to plays or musicals, comedy shows, and hiking.

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • William Shomali

    William Shomali

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    BioDr. Shomali is a clinical assistant professor of Hematology at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is board certified in hematology & medical oncology.

    Dr. Shomali specializes in the treatment of blood cancers such as myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. He aims to provide compassionate, personalized, and evidence-based care to each patient.

    Dr. Shomali received his medical degree from the University of Jordan, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center where he studied infections in cancer patients and the role of biomarkers in defining tumor fever. He completed his residency training in Internal Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation where he served as a Chief Medical Resident. He then joined Stanford University for his combined Hematology & Oncology fellowship training.

    Dr. Shomali’s research interests include the study of novel agents in myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. He developed investigator-initiated clinical trials for patients with eosinophilic neoplasms and advanced myelofibrosis. In addition, he co-authored several papers and book chapters discussing the care of patients with cancer. His work has been presented in national meetings and published in peer reviewed journals including Blood, American Journal of Hematology, British Journal of Hematology, Leukemia & Lymphoma, and Cancer.

    Among his honors, Dr. Shomali received the Cleveland Clinic Excellence in Teaching Award and was named to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. He has received a Young Investigator Award from the Conquer Cancer Foundation, an NIH Institutional National Research Service Award, and a Stanford Cancer Institute Fellowship Award.

    Dr. Shomali is a member of the American Society of Hematology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  • Aimee D. Shu

    Aimee D. Shu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    BioI am an endocrinologist with particular interests in reproductive and bone health.

    I enjoy treating patients with menstrual disorders, menopause, fractures, osteoporosis, parathyroid imbalance, and calcium imbalance.

    As a certified menopause practitioner (North American Menopause Society), I help women fine-tune their health at the mid-life transition. Some women transition through menopause with ease, while others experience challenging symptoms like hot flashes, slowed metabolism, and mood changes. This transition period provides a good opportunity to create a "game plan" for preserving future health. It also marks the beginning of natural bone loss, leaving one more susceptible to fragility fractures.

    I provide individualized treatment plans for bone health to men and women of all ages, including for those with specific challenges such as chronic steroid use. As a certified clinical densitometrist (International Society for Clinical Densitometry), I personally review all my patients' bone density scan images. Thus, please bring any non-Stanford bone density scan images to your appointment with me.

    Appointments with me are available on Stanford's main campus (300 Pastuer Drive) and at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center (450 Broadway, Redwood City).

  • Takudzwa Shumba

    Takudzwa Shumba

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Takudzwa Shumba is a family medicine clinician-educator with particular interests in global health equity, preventative medicine, women's health, pediatrics and integrative medicine. She was born and raised in Zimbabwe. Prior to beginning medical school at Stanford, she completed a Master's in Public Health at Yale, with a focus in global health. She has been involved in public health projects in Zimbabwe, Hong Kong and mainland China and Kenya. She completed her residency at Stanford Health Care - O'Connor Hospital Family Medicine in San Jose, prior to joining faculty at Stanford Family Medicine. LGBTQQI friendly. After several years as a continuity primary care provider at Stanford Family Medicine, she transitioned to providing quality same day access for acute patient needs.

    She is currently Co-director of the Leadership Education in Advancing Diversity (LEAD) program, Associate Director of the Clinical Summer Internship (CSI), Course Director of the undergraduate seminar “Decolonizing Global Health,” and Co-Director of the "Social and Environmental Determinants of Health" elective. She is a California Health Care Foundation (CHCF) Fellow (2020-2022) and Presidential Leadership Scholar (2022). She previously served as the Primary Care and Population Health (PCPH) Division Global Health faculty lead and PCPH DEI faculty lead.

  • Anjali Sibley MD, MPH

    Anjali Sibley MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Sibley is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at Stanford School of Medicine. She is the Director of the Stanford Medicine Cancer Center in Emeryville and is a board-certified, fellowship-trained hematologist and medical oncologist.

    Her clinical interests include treating solid tumor cancers, lung cancers, blood cancers and benign blood conditions. She is interested in cancer prevention and reducing disparities in hematologic/oncologic care among underserved populations, and successful cancer survivorship programs.

    In addition to responsibilities related to patient care and overseeing the Cancer Center in Emeryville, Dr. Sibley has developed and is leading an innovative cancer survivorship clinic, including an exercise initiative. She also is passionate about advancing clinical trial enrollment for medically underserved populations and she serves on the Cancer Network’s East Bay Health Equity Committee leading lung cancer screening efforts in the East Bay. She is also working on a Stanford Cancer Institute-funded study examining psychosocial factors and cardiac health in Black cancer patients in the East Bay.

    She believes that providing patient care is a true privilege. Dr. Sibley utilizes a patient-centered practice approach that addresses multiple aspects of a patient’s well-being. Her research interests have included chemoprevention of breast cancer and the development of magnetic resonance imaging technology in breast cancer detection and mapping. She has also led community-based efforts to implement low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) as a screening tool for cancer.

    Dr. Sibley’s publications include articles on breast cancer prevention, breast magnetic resonance imaging, and other topics. Her work has appeared in American Journal of Hematology, JAMA, the Breast Journal, Internal Medicine News, and elsewhere. Dr. Sibley was invited to deliver a peer-reviewed presentation on community-based cancer screening and preventive education to the Global Health Council. Dr. Sibley is on the board of directors of the Cancer Support Community SF Bay Area. She has also served as a clinic physician for the Native American Health Center of Oakland, on the Committee on Health Equity of the American Public Health Association, and as chair and vice chair of the Cancer Forum Caucus of the American Public Health Association. She is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Preventive Oncology, and American Society of Hematology. She has provided volunteer services to the Global Health Council and to the Cancer Patients Aid Association, for whom she conducted a patient screening and education program in Mumbai, India.

  • Surbhi Sidana, MD

    Surbhi Sidana, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Sidana is a hematologist/oncologist who is fellowship trained in advanced hematology with an emphasis on myeloma, amyloidosis, and dysproteinemia disorders. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation & Cellular Therapy, at Stanford University School of Medicine. She leads the Myeloma Cellular Immunotherapy program at Stanford.

    Her areas of expertise include transplantation and novel cellular immunotherapies such as CAR-T-cell therapy for patients with multiple myeloma. For each patient, Dr. Sidana develops a personalized care plan designed to optimize outcomes and quality of life.

    Dr. Sidana conducts extensive research. Currently, she is conducting clinical trials of CAR-T therapy and bispecific T-cell engagers for treatment of patients with myeloma. She is studying patients’ access to CAR-T cell therapy, the financial burden of the treatment, and its impact on patients’ quality of life and cognitive function.

    Dr Sidana has received a grant from the Stanford Medicine Cancer Institute and NIH funding through the Stanford KL2 program to study adverse events of CAR-T therapy on patients and monitoring of patients undergoing CAR-T therapy using wearable devices.

    In the past, Dr. Sidana received Conquer Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology for her research on the impact of clinical trial participation on patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma. She has also received grants from the Amyloidosis Foundation and International Waldenstrom’s Macrogloulinemia Foundation to understand AL amyloidosis, a rare disease caused by buildup of an abnormal protein.

    Dr. Sidana has given presentations at regional and national conferences and her work has been published in high-impact journals.

    Dr. Sidana has been recognized for her work with many honors, including an Outstanding Hematology/Oncology Fellow award and Outstanding Research Fellow award from the Mayo Clinic.

    She is a member of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, International Myeloma Society, International Society of Amyloidosis, and American Society of Transplantation & Cellular Therapy. Dr. Sidana is often an invited speaker at patient support groups as well as symposia and workshops for her peers.

  • Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests: cancer pharmacology, mechanisms of resistance to anticancer drugs, regulation and function of MDR1 and tubulin genes, CD47 as a target for activation of anticancer macrophases, Phase I trials of new drugs, gene expression profiling of cancers

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    BioJulia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology and Obstetrics and Gynecology in Maternal Fetal Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford’s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Sundeep Singh

    Sundeep Singh

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioAfter living and training throughout the country, I am excited to be part of the Stanford team. As a result of both my personal experiences and training, I am passionate about ensuring that patients receive appropriate diagnostic testing and treatment options in order to improve people's quality of life. In collaboration with my amazing colleagues, I am confident in the high quality and easily accessible care we are able to provide to patients across northern California.

    While my interest is most in inflammatory bowel disease, I am also interested in the interaction between mental health, incentives, and emerging therapies in gastroenterology.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Infectious Disease and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • Sidhartha Sinha

    Sidhartha Sinha

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThere are two primary and overlapping emphases of my research, both of which are driven and united by needs-based innovation and translational potential:

    (1) Understanding the microenvironment of the inflamed versus normal gut in order to identify better therapeutic targets for people with immune-¬mediated GI disorders. Here, our investigations include understanding the influence and interactions of pharmacologic and dietary interventions on gut microbiome/metabolomic changes and the host immune response. In the context of providing patients with new understanding and solutions for their disease, I have led and advised on the design of both pilot and large clinical trials (including new FDA approved therapies) for anti-inflammatory therapies;

    (2) Applying novel approaches and technologies (including natural language processing, computer vision, and reinforcement learning) to identify and address unmet clinical needs. In this area we have ongoing and published efforts in my lab to validate and develop solutions to pressing clinical needs. We have developed/led new drug delivery technologies with a multidisciplinary team that have shown strong potential in ongoing human IBD clinical trials. My lab has utilized both supervised and unsupervised approaches to analyze social media discourse and unstructured data sets for identifying patient needs that are rarely addressed in clinical settings. We have gained insights into patient perceptions around preventative health interventions, such as health screening and diet, including the dearth of evidence-based dietary recommendations to treat IBD (despite strong patient desire for solutions in this domain).

  • Tammy Lisa Sirich

    Tammy Lisa Sirich

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI conduct translational research focused on uremia and dialysis. I use mass spectrometry to conduct studies testing ways to reduce levels of solutes and examining the contribution of uremic solutes to illness.

  • Kelley M. Skeff, MD, PhD

    Kelley M. Skeff, MD, PhD

    George DeForest Barnett Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and evaluation of improved teaching methods; assessment of teacher's attitudes toward their teaching role; study of clinical teaching; evaluation of alternative methods of learning in clinical clerkships (e.g. computer assisted instruction, video tape review, etc.).

  • Peter Michael Sklarin

    Peter Michael Sklarin

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sklarin practices endocrinology at Menlo Medical Clinic. He is a graduate of Harvard College, where he majored in biology. He attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, completed his internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and completed his endocrinology fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

    Dr. Sklarin is board certified in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism and treats patients with a wide variety of endocrine disorders. He has special expertise in thyroid ultrasound and ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration and directs the Menlo Clinic bone density center.

    In his free time Dr. Sklarin enjoys spending time with his family, playing tennis, running, biking, swimming, and doing triathlons.

  • Grant M. Smith, MD

    Grant M. Smith, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Grant Smith is a palliative care physician and Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine. He is the medical director of the Stanford Palliative Care Center of Excellence (PCCOE) Community Partnerships Team, and he is the lead for quality improvement in advance care planning in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. Dr. Smith graduated with a Bachelor of Science in psychology from Duke University. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He completed residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco with a focus in primary care, followed by a chief resident year at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. He subsequently completed his palliative care fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. As part of the Stanford faculty, he is an attending on the palliative care inpatient service and as a provider in the outpatient palliative care clinic in Palo Alto.

  • Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Smith is a board-certified, fellowship-trained medical oncologist and hematologist. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

    She is a physician-scientist who conducts extensive research. She completed a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Clinical Research Training (now, the Medical Research Scholars) Program and she was a post-doctoral researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Her research focuses on studies evaluating strategies whereby donor T cells can be administered to improve outcomes following blood and marrow transplant. Specifically, she studies novel treatment strategies using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy.

    Dr. Smith has been invited to present the findings of her research at regional, national, and international conferences. At the Insights in Hematology Conference, she focused on the use of CAR T cells for blood cancers, whereas she presented her investigations on the associations between CAR T cells and the intestinal microbiome at the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Further, at the annual meeting of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy, she addressed the importance of training scientists from underrepresented populations.

    Dr. Smith has co-authored articles on topics within the field of cancer immunology, including cancer immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and CAR T cell therapy. Her work has appeared in journals, including Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood Advances, Leukemia, Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Medicine, and elsewhere.

    She serves a peer reviewer for publications in various journals, such as Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Haematologica, and ImmunoMedicine. She also has co-written chapters in books, including Pocket Oncology, Current Concepts and Controversies in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, and Advanced Concepts in Human Immunology: Prospects for Disease Control.

    Dr. Smith has also earned numerous honors. The American Society of Hematology, Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and many other professional societies and organizations have recognized her achievements as a clinician, researcher, and scholar.

    She is a member of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Subcommittee on Immunotherapy and the co-chair of the Committee on Trainees and Junior Faculty for the American Society of Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (ASTCT). Other positions in service to professional organizations include co-chairing committees and task forces dedicated to promoting diversity among hematology and cell therapy specialists.

  • Katia Sol

    Katia Sol

    Academic Staff - Hourly - CSL, Medicine
    Lecturer, Change Leadership for Sustainability
    Temp - Non-Exempt, Distinguished Careers Institute

    Current Role at StanfordAssistant Director, Health and Human Performance, Stanford Flourishing

    Lecturer, Health and Human Performance (LEAD, WELLNESS & LIFEWORKS)

  • Irene Sonu

    Irene Sonu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioI am passionate about gut health and strive to provide the best care to my patients. I specialize in complex motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. My areas of clinical expertise include achalasia, dysphagia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastroparesis, functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, and pelvic floor dysfunction. I also see patients in need of fecal microbiota transplant for recurrent C. difficile infection.

  • Allyson Spence

    Allyson Spence

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioAllyson Spence MD, PhD is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her MD, PhD in the MSTP program at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, studying basic mechanisms of transcription using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system in the laboratory of Dr. Tony Weil. She went on to an internship and residency at the University of Pennsylvania before returning to Stanford to complete her Oncology fellowship training. She did a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford in the department of Molecular Biology under the auspices of Dr. Margaret Fuller, where she was the recipient of a career award.

    She has transitioned from basic science research to clinical medicine where she sees patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Additionally, she has an appointment at the Palo Alto VA as a staff oncologist where she focuses on women's cancers and women at high risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers. She is involved in several translational research projects at the VA, as well as being involved in clinical trials.

  • Sean Paul Spencer, MD,PhD

    Sean Paul Spencer, MD,PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioSean Spencer, MD,PhD is a Gastroenterologist and Physician Scientist at Stanford University working with Justin Sonennburg,PhD to uncover the role of dietary intake on the gut microbiome and mucosal immune system. Sean obtained his medical degree University of Pennsylvania, earning his PhD studying nutritional immunology with Yasmine Belkaid,PhD at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), after which he moved to Boston for residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital and completed his Gastroenterology training at Stanford University. Sean’s career goal is to study mechanisms by which dietary intake influences our microbiome and immune system to better understand and treat gastrointestinal disease.

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMPR, ENG, ACVRL1 (ALK1), SMAD signaling
    Structural and molecular programs governing right ventricular adaptation and failure
    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia
    Pulmonary Arteriovenous malformations
    Computational Drug Prediction and Repurposing
    Deep Tissue Confocal Imaging

  • Joshua M. Spin

    Joshua M. Spin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Spin began his research career studying the structural biology of low density lipoprotein, and has been augmenting his skills with intensive training in molecular biology techniques, particularly those involving high-throughput genetic expression profiling. He is especially interested in vascular smooth muscle cells, and the role of smooth muscle differentiation and phenotypic switching in development and vascular disease. His latest work has focused on the biology of aortic aneurysms.

  • Sandy Srinivas

    Sandy Srinivas

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interests: general oncology, genito-urinary malignancy Research interests: conducting clinical trials in advanced prostate cancer, bladder cancer and renal cell carcinoma

  • Malathi Srinivasan

    Malathi Srinivasan

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Srinivasan is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, Associate Director at the Stanford Center for Asian Healthcare Research and Education (Stanford CARE), Director of the Stanford CARE Scholars research program, Director of the Stanford Implementation Sciences Fellowship, Fellow at the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH), Board Member for the Stanford Health Professions Education and Scholars (SHaPES, formerly CTSS), and member of the Stanford Teaching and Mentoring Academy (TMA). She is co-Director of the One Health Teaching Scholars Faculty Development Program, an international program focusing on faculty development for health professions education around the world. She is a contributor to CBS-KPIX “Medical Mondays”. Dr. Srinivasan brings her skills as an educator, physician, health services researcher, and entrepreneur to considering how scalable technologies can improve health care. Her work in Virtual Health/telemedicine and new patient engagement models has been published in the NEJM Catalyst – a leading healthcare innovation journal.

    Previously, Dr. Srinivasan was a Master Clinical Educator and Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine. She was the Senior Associate Editor and Editorial Fellowship Director for the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and was the Kimitaka Kaga Visiting Professor at the University of Tokyo at the International Research Center for Medical Education. At UC Davis, Dr. Srinivasan was the Director of Practice Based Learning and Improvement and Medical Director of the Clinical Performance Examination for a decade. She is former President of the California-Hawaii Society of General Internal Medicine, and ex-officio National Council Member for SGIM. She was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar and US Health and Human Service Public Policy Fellow. Dr. Srinivasan has been awarded the California SGIM Educator of the Year Award, Mentor of the Year (California American College of Physicians), and Faculty of the Year (Stanford CARE), and was recognized with the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Education (UC Davis). Her research has focused on two themes. Fist, improving physician competency around clinical decision-making, through Virtual Health, technology-aided education and reflective practice. Second, addressing health disparities for vulnerable populations. She also pursues her interests in the Medical Humanities on the Executive Board of The Pegasus Physician Writers Program at Stanford and as Director of the Medicine, Movement and Dance program within Stanford's medical humanities program, Medicine and the Muse.

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.

  • Natasha Z. Rabinowitz Steele

    Natasha Z. Rabinowitz Steele

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    BioInternship & Residency Stanford University School of Medicine
    MD, University of Washington
    MPH, The George Washington University
    BA, Mount Holyoke College

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D is a Professor of Medicine Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and by courtesy, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stefanick’s research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. She is currently the Principal Investigator the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Extension Study, having been the PI of the Stanford Clinical Center of the landmark WHI Clinical Trials and Observational Study since 1994 and Chair of the WHI Steering and Executive Committees from 1998-2011, as well as PI of the WHI Strong and Healthy (WHISH) Trial which is testing the hypothesis that a DHHS-based physical activity intervention, being delivered to a multi-ethnic cohort of about 24,000 WHI participants across the U.S., aged 68-99 when the trial started in 2015, will reduce major cardiovascular events over 8 years, compared to an equal number of “usual activity” controls. Dr. Stefanick is also PI of the Osteoporotic Study of Men (MrOS) which is continuing to conduct clinical assessments of bone and body composition in survivors of an original cohort of nearly 6000 men aged 65 and over in 2001. As founding Director of the Stanford Women’s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM, “wisdom”) Center, she plays a major role in promoting research and teaching on Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease, Women’s Health and Queer Health and Medicine. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles at the Stanford School of Medicine, including as co-leader of the Population Sciences Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford’s NCI-funded comprehensive cancer center.

    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology, with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research led to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been her academic home for nearly 40 years.

  • Simon H. Stertzer, MD, FACC,FAHA,FACP

    Simon H. Stertzer, MD, FACC,FAHA,FACP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCoronary Angioplasty; Intramyocardial Stem cell delivery

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImmunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis, and the parasitic disease, trypanosomiasis.