School of Medicine


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  • Marwa Abu El Haija

    Marwa Abu El Haija

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioI am a pediatric gastroenterologist with clinical and research interest in childhood obesity. I believe that each patient is unique in their disease and background, that is why they deserve to be approached in an individualized way. I aspire to discover what's unknown about the pathophysiologic causes of obesity, and the mechanisms of which treatments work. My clinical and research interests in pediatric obesity found home within Stanford's distinctive position academically, medically and geographically.

  • Leina Alrabadi

    Leina Alrabadi

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioI enjoy working with a multidisciplinary team to care for patients who have complex medical needs with the aim of giving children a better future. As a clinical researcher, my main focus is on finding improved therapies for autoimmune and cholestatic liver diseases, since an ideal therapy currently does not exist.

  • Rosa Bacchetta

    Rosa Bacchetta

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn the coming years, I plan to further determine the genetic and immunological basis of diseases with autoimmunity or immune dysregulation in children. I believe that much can still be learned from the in depth mechanistic studies of pediatric autoimmune diseases. Genomic analysis of the patients' samples has become possible which may provide a rapid indication of altered target molecules. I plan to implement robust functional studies to define the consequences of these genetic abnormalities and bridge them to the patient's clinical phenotype.

    Understanding functional consequences of gene mutations in single case/family first and then validating the molecular and cellular defects in other patients with similar phenotypes, will anticipate and complement cellular and gene therapy strategies.

    For further information please visit the Bacchetta Lab website:
    http://med.stanford.edu/bacchettalab.html

  • Dorsey Bass

    Dorsey Bass

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is interested in the pathophysiology, immunology, and epidemiology of viral gastroenteritis.

  • Rachel Bensen

    Rachel Bensen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on improving health care delivery systems for children, adolescents and young adults with chronic illness and their families. I have particular interests in the development of chronic disease self-management skills, assessment of patient reported outcomes, the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care, and comprehensive programs to support families caring for a child with chronic illness.

  • Jon Bernstein

    Jon Bernstein

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on the diagnosis, discovery and delineation of rare genetic conditions with a focus of neurodevelopmental disorders. This work includes the application of novel computational methods and multi-omics profiling (whole genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, metabolomics). I additionally participate in an interdisciplinary project to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of genetic neurodevelopmental disorders..

  • William Berquist

    William Berquist

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastroenterology, gastointestinal motility, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  • Alice Bertaina MD, PhD

    Alice Bertaina MD, PhD

    Lorry I. Lokey Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bertaina is a highly experienced clinician and will play a key role in supporting Section Chief Dr. Rajni Agarwal and Clinical Staff in the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. She will also continue her research on immune recovery and miRNA, understanding the mechanisms underlying immune reconstitution, Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT in pediatric patients affected by hematological malignant and non-malignant disorders.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Ricardo Castillo

    Ricardo Castillo

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudy of the interaction and role of nutrients and intestinal growth factors in enhancing intestinal adaptation and allograft viability using animal models for short bowel syndrome and orthtopic intestinal transplantation.

    Study of immunosuppression regimens and induction of immune tolerance in intestinal transplantation.

  • Ruben J Colman, MD, PhD

    Ruben J Colman, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioDr. Colman is a pediatric gastroenterologist and physician-scientist with an overarching goal to improve and optimize the quality of care and outcomes for children with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) through precision medicine approaches. His interdisciplinary team science research program focuses on making precision medicine clinically actionable through innovative solutions merging clinical pharmacology knowledge with ‘-omics’ discoveries using microbiome and metabolomics signatures. Part of this work includes translating these findings into improved clinical treat-to-target endpoints with immediate noninvasive point-of-care measures such as intestinal ultrasound.

    The foundation of his current work originates from his PhD titled ‘Precision Dosing and Personalized Medicine in pediatric IBD’. During his training, Dr. Colman was also an American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) editorial fellow for Gastroenterology and he is actively involved in the committees of several professional societies including the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. Dr. Colman is currently supported by Early Career Awards of the Thrasher Research Fund, the NASPGHAN Foundation and the Stanford Medicine Children’s Health Center for IBD and Celiac Disease Research Program.

  • Kenneth L. Cox

    Kenneth L. Cox

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastroenterology, biliary motility, hormonal regulation, embryology, gastrointestinal tract, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  • Genevieve D'Souza

    Genevieve D'Souza

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioGenevieve D’souza MD, FASA is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Pediatric Anesthesia division of the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. She is a Board-certified Pediatric Anesthesiologist , Fellowship trained Pediatric Pain Doctor, and trained in Medical Acupuncture.
    She is a practicing Chronic Pediatric Pain Doctor at Stanford Medicine Children's Health and is also part of the Acute Pain Service. She is the Interim Medical Director of the Pediatric Pain Division. She is also the Director of the Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital.
    She is also the Senior Editor for the Visual Pearl Series For the Society of Pediatric Pain Medicine and on the Board of Directors for Society of Pediatric Pain Medicine.

  • Dylan Dodd

    Dylan Dodd

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHarnessing the gut microbiome to treat human disease.

  • Noelle Hanako Ebel

    Noelle Hanako Ebel

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include:
    -indications for combined heart-liver transplantation
    -mitigating perioperative bleeding during cardiac surgery in children with Alagille syndrome
    -congenital heart disease and liver transplantation
    -subspecialty advocacy

  • Carlos O. Esquivel, M.D., Ph.D.,FACS

    Carlos O. Esquivel, M.D., Ph.D.,FACS

    Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor in Pediatric Transplantation and Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) and of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Induction of immunotolerance
    2) Rejection of liver and intestinal transplantation.
    3) Clinical outcomes of children with unresectable liver tumors.

  • Nielsen Fernandez-Becker

    Nielsen Fernandez-Becker

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioI am the director of the Celiac Disease Program at Stanford and I am highly experienced in diagnosis and management of celiac disease and gluten associated disorders.
    My objective is to provide excellent and compassionate clinical care for my patients while seeking a better understanding of diseases I treat, particularly Celiac disease (CeD), eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). My top priorities are patient care and translational research to make new discoveries and improve the care my patients.

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Liu (Liao) Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe microbiome carries out extraordinary feats of biology: it produces hundreds of molecules, many of which impact host physiology; modulates immune function potently and specifically; self-organizes biogeographically; and exhibits profound stability in the face of perturbations. Our lab studies the mechanisms of microbiome-host interactions. Our approach is based on two technologies we recently developed: a complex (119-member) defined gut community that serves as an analytically manageable but biologically relevant system for experimentation, and new genetic systems for common species from the microbiome. Using these systems, we investigate mechanisms at the community level and the strain level.

    1) Community-level mechanisms. A typical gut microbiome consists of 200-250 bacterial species that span >6 orders of magnitude in relative abundance. As a system, these bacteria carry out extraordinary feats of metabolite consumption and production, elicit a variety of specific immune cell populations, self-organize geographically and metabolically, and exhibit profound resilience against a wide range of perturbations. Yet remarkably little is known about how the community functions as a system. We are exploring this by asking two broad questions: How do groups of organisms work together to influence immune function? What are the mechanisms that govern metabolism and ecology at the 100+ strain scale? Our goal is to learn rules that will enable us to design communities that solve specific therapeutic problems.

    2) Strain-level mechanisms. Even though gut and skin colonists live in communities, individual strains can have an extraordinary impact on host biology. We focus on two broad (and partially overlapping) categories:

    Immune modulation: Can we redirect colonist-specific T cells against an antigen of interest by expressing it on the surface of a bacterium? How do skin colonists induce high levels of Staphylococcus-specific antibodies in mice and humans?

    Abundant microbiome-derived molecules: By constructing single-strain/single-gene knockouts in a complex defined community, we will ask: What are the effects of bacterially produced molecules on host metabolism and immunology? Can the molecular output of low-abundance organisms impact host physiology?

    3) Cell and gene therapy. We have begun two new efforts in mammalian cell and gene therapies. First, we are developing methods that enable cell-type specific delivery of genome editing payloads in vivo. We are especially interested in delivery vehicles that are customizable and easy to manufacture. Second, we have begun a comprehensive genome mining effort with an emphasis on understudied or entirely novel enzyme systems with utility in mammalian genome editing.

  • Adam Frymoyer

    Adam Frymoyer

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on understanding the clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of medicines used in complex pediatric populations. This includes identifying sources of variation in drug response through the application of population PK-PD modeling and simulation approaches. The goal is to ultimately apply this quantitative understanding to guide therapeutic decision-making in infants and children.

  • Hayley Gans

    Hayley Gans

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe focus of my laboratory is the immune response to viral vaccines evaluating the ontogeny of responses in infants and limitations in immunocompromised hosts. We have studied responses to an early two-dose measles immunization, one versus 2 doses of varicella immunization, and polio vaccine in preterm versus term infants. Other active areas of research include measles and varicella immunity in HIV infected individuals, and transplant recipients.

  • Chris Garcia

    Chris Garcia

    Younger Family Professor and Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Christopher Gardner

    Christopher Gardner

    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of nutrition in individual and societal health, with particular interests in: plant-based diets, differential response to low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss diets by insulin resistance status, chronic disease prevention, randomized controlled trials, human nutrition, community based studies, Community Based Participatory Research, sustainable food movement (animal rights and welfare, global warming, human labor practices), stealth health, nutrition policy, nutrition guidelines

  • Rachel E. Herdes

    Rachel E. Herdes

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a pediatric physician-investigator, I strive to understand the role of nutrition and diet therapy in pediatric health. I am particularly interested in understanding and developing novel treatment plans for adolescent patients with obesity and in establishing guidelines to improve health outcomes for pediatric intestinal failure patients.

    Current research studies include novel treatment options for pediatric metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD), health equity in pediatric patients with intestinal failure, and medication management after metabolic and bariatric surgery in pediatric patients with severe obesity.

  • Sohail Z Husain

    Sohail Z Husain

    Chambers-Okamura Endowed Professor of Pediatric Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research delves into three broad areas of the exocrine pancreas: (1) The crucial signaling pathways that initiate and transduce pancreatitis; (2) the factors that turn on pancreatic regeneration and recovery after pancreatic injury; and (3) the mechanisms underlying drug-induced pancreatitis.

  • Hilary Jericho

    Hilary Jericho

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinical associate professor of pediatric gastroenterology and the Inaugural Medical Director of the Celiac Disease Program at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford whose clinical practice and research have an emphasis on the diagnosis and management of celiac disease. I was appointed the Director of Pediatric Clinical Research at the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center in 2014. I am deeply involved in both local community and national professional societies serving as the Director of the Chicagoland Children’s Health Alliance (CCHA) endoscopy committee and am a member of the CCHA celiac committee, the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) celiac special interest group, CeliacKids (a pediatric multi-center celiac research focused collaborative), the Standards-Based Active Guideline Environment (a committee responsible for the establishment of guidelines for accommodating children with celiac disease within school settings across the United States), and the NASPGHAN Endoscopy committee. My clinical work and research focus on pediatric celiac disease (CeD) and have resulted in numerous publications, peer-reviewed articles, and book chapters. This research has also helped to establish myself as an expert in the field of pediatric celiac disease leading to invitations to speak and be a moderator at both local and national meetings, including the internationally attended University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center educational preceptorship programs, the NASPGHAN annual meeting and Beyond Celiac. I have additionally been called up to provide celiac specific journal reviews as well as expert opinions to leading publications, including US News and World Report, Reader’s Digest and Reuter’s. The current application builds logically on my prior work in the field of pediatric celiac disease for which I have successfully administered the projects (staffing, research coordination, budgeting, data analysis and manuscript creation). In summary, I have the expertise, leadership, training, and motivation necessary to successfully carry out the proposed research projects.

  • John Kerner

    John Kerner

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in pediatric nutritional support and have experience evaluating new enteral and parenteral products especially for the neonate (I studied a "new" I.V. fat product for Abbott; I participated in a multicenter trial of a formula with fish oil in it for neonates with Mead Johnson and a multicenter trial of a new human milk fortifier for Wyeth).

  • Kian Keyashian

    Kian Keyashian

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioThe management of inflammatory bowel disease continues to evolve, with the introduction of biologic and small molecule therapies and new goals of treatment, with an emphasis on healing the bowel. My career goal since my graduation from IBD fellowship in 2012 has been to improve the outcomes and quality of life of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In line with these goals, my research has focused investigating new noninvasive diagnostic test, finding factors early in the disease course that might predict a more aggressive disease course and need for different therapies, and investigating new promising effective medications with less side effects.

  • Nasim Sabery Khavari

    Nasim Sabery Khavari

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Gastroenterology, Celiac Disease, Nutrition in Celiac Disease

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

  • Calvin Kuo

    Calvin Kuo

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study cancer biology, intestinal stem cells (ISC), and angiogenesis. We use primary organoid cultures of diverse tissues and tumor biopsies for immunotherapy modeling, oncogene functional screening and stem cell biology. Angiogenesis projects include blood-brain barrier regulation, stroke therapeutics and anti-angiogenic cancer therapy. ISC projects apply organoid culture and ko mice to injury-inducible vs homeostatic stem cells and symmetric division mechanisms.

  • Bomi Lee

    Bomi Lee

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImmune mechanisms in pancreatic diseases, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

  • Grace Lee

    Grace Lee

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    BioDr. Grace Lee is Chief Quality Officer and the Christopher G. Dawes Endowed Director of Quality at Stanford Medicine Children’s Health and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and Associate Dean for Maternal and Child Health (Quality and Safety) and Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine. She oversees the Center for Pediatric and Maternal Value that seeks to improve quality, safety, patient experience and health equity across the organization. Dr. Lee previously served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee (IOM) to Review Priorities in the National Vaccine Plan, the IOM Committee on the Ethical and Scientific Issues in Studying the Safety of Approved Drugs, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Committee on Vaccine Research and Development Recommendations for Advancing Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza Preparedness and Response, and AHRQ's Healthcare Safety and Quality Improvement Research Study Section. She also served as a Board Member for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. She was previously the Chair of the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) that recommends vaccines for the U.S. population, and she is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine.

  • Mary Leonard

    Mary Leonard

    Arline and Pete Harman Professor and Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy multidisciplinary research program is focused on (1) the detrimental effects of glucocorticoids, sarcopenia and inflammation on bone development in pediatric diseases, (2) the long-term effects of childhood cancer on bone and muscle quality, (3) the assessment of renal osteodystrophy using novel micro-imaging techniques, (4) the effects of vitamin D deficiency on physical function and cardiovascular disease, and (5) the evaluation of biomechanical interventions as anabolic bone therapies.

  • David B. Lewis

    David B. Lewis

    Naddisy Foundation Professor of Pediatric Food Allergy, Immunology, and Asthma

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory is focused on defining cellular and molecular mechanisms that limit T cell responses to vaccines and pathogens during normal early postnatal development and in cases of inherited genetic immunodeficiencies. We are also determinomg how these limitations in immunity can be overcome by using novel approaches for vaccine adjuvants for influenza vaccine and by using catalytically inactive Cas proteins for inducing endogenous gene expression.

  • David Maahs

    David Maahs

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr David M. Maahs is the Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics, Division Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology, and Associate Chair for Academic Affairs in Pediatrics at Stanford University and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. He earned his MD followed by Pediatric Residency at the University of New Mexico. After 3 years on New Mexico’s faculty, Dr. Maahs completed a Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship and a concurrent PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Colorado. He remained on Colorado’s faculty for 10 years, advancing to Professor of Pediatrics before moving to Stanford. Prior to his medical career, Dr. Maahs received a BA and MA in English from the University of Kansas and was inspired to pursue a medical career after serving in the Peace Corps with assignments in Tunisia and the Central African Republic.

    Dr. Maahs’ leadership experiences include being a past co-Chair (2013-16) for Protocols and Publications with the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange for which he continues as Director of International Collaborations. This complements his role as President-elect for the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2021-25) and Editor-in-Chief for the 2018 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. He served on the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2016-18), which writes the annual ADA Standards of Care. Previously, he served on the ADA Scientific Sessions committee representing the Council on Youth. He has also served on national committees for the American Heart Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and multiple journal editorial boards and review committees.

    His scholarly interest is improving care and preventing complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Along with Dr Peter Chase, he is author of the 12th and 13th editions of Understanding Diabetes, or ‘Pink Panther,’ which are the most widely used educational books for children newly diagnosed with T1D, distributed internationally by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF). More specifically, he has conducted epidemiologic studies that help generate hypotheses for clinical studies, including trials to develop artificial pancreas systems to improve glucose control, lower disease burden, prevent the complications of diabetes, and reduce disparities in diabetes care. He is author or co-author of over 350 research publications. His multi-disciplinary research has been funded by the JDRF, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Dr Maahs is Associate Director for the recently formed and NIDDK P30 funded Stanford University Diabetes Research Center (https://sdrc.stanford.edu). His collaborations extend to his role as Principal Investigator (PI) or steering committee member for NIH funded multi-center clinical trials including the FLEX, PERL, and ACTION studies as well as multiple Artificial Pancreas clinical trials. Education, mentorship, and training leadership includes being Program Director with Dr. Georgeanna Klingensmith on the Barbara Davis Center T32 and K12 training grants in Pediatric Endocrinology while at the University of Colorado. He is the PI on the Stanford NIH funded K12 "Training Research Leaders in Type 1 Diabetes.' Dr Maahs is also the Associate Chair for Academic Affairs for the Department of Pediatrics.

    While in the Peace Corps, David met his wife, Christine Walravens, who is also a Pediatrician at Stanford. They enjoy outdoor activities and traveling with their adult children.

  • Elizabeth Mellins

    Elizabeth Mellins

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms and intracellular pathways of MHC class II antigen processing and presentation, with a focus on B cells; mechanisms underlying HLA allele association with disease; disease mechanisms in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, including an HLA-linked complication; monocytes as drivers or suppressors of auto-inflammation in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and pediatric acute neuropsychiatric syndrome.

  • Shweta S. Namjoshi MD MPH

    Shweta S. Namjoshi MD MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. The mission of the International Intestinal Failure Registry (IIFR) is to provide the international intestinal rehabilitation and transplant community with accurate data on the outcomes and course of intestinal failure to support research, quality improvement, and policy development. https://tts.org/irta-registries/irta-ifr

    2. NCT05241444 is the first-in-human, Phase 1 clinical trial will test the feasibility of the manufacturing and the safety of the administration of CD4^LVFOXP3 in up to 36 evaluable human participants with IPEX and evaluate the impact of the CD4^LVFOXP3 infusion on the disease.

    3. Stanford's local Intestinal Failure Registry (SIFR) ensures ongoing assessment and improvement of intestinal failure outcomes and care provided at Stanford in collaboratiton with the Division of Pediatric Surgery. This registry focuses on clinical outcomes and social developmental outcomes for patients with short bowel syndrome, pediatric CODEs, and pseudoobstruction.

  • Amrita Narang

    Amrita Narang

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioMy clinical and research interests are in neonatal cholestatic liver diseases, including biliary atresia and fatty liver disease. I'm also highly experienced in liver transplant care, with a particular focus on teen and transition of care.

    In addition to my clinical and research work, I'm deeply committed to medical education and patient education. I believe that knowledge is power, and I strive to empower my patients and their families with the resources and information they need to make informed decisions about their care.

    As a physician, I'm dedicated to providing the highest level of care to my patients and their families. I believe that every child deserves the best possible chance at a healthy and fulfilling life, and I'm honored to play a role in helping them achieve that goal.

  • Meeta Raman Patel

    Meeta Raman Patel

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioDr. Patel has been working with children with autism and other disabilities for over 20 years. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Dr. Patel received a BS degree from the University of California at Davis in 1996 in Psychology with an emphasis in Biology. She continued her graduate training in Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Patel received her PhD in Psychology with an emphasis in Behavior Analysis.

    She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2001. Dr. Patel joined the faculty at the Marcus and Kennedy Krieger Institutes in 2001 and Emory University School of Medicine in 2002. Dr. Patel was a case manager in the Pediatric Feeding Disorders and Early Intervention Programs at the Marcus and Kennedy Krieger Institutes from 2001-2003. In 2003, she started Clinic 4 Kidz, which is a home-based Interdisciplinary Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program. Currently, she serves as the Executive Director of Clinic 4 Kidz.

    Her research and clinical interests focus on treating feeding problems in children who have underlying medical issues (e.g., prematurity, failure to thrive [FTT], tube dependence, gastroesophageal reflux [GER], food allergies, etc.). In addition, she has expertise in working with children with autism, more specifically treating food selectivity by type and/or texture.

    She currently serves on the editorial board of Behavioral Development which is a journal of the American Psychological Association. She formerly served on the editorial boards for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Education and Treatment of Children. Dr. Patel also serves as a guest reviewer for several journals. She has published over 20 research studies in peer-reviewed journals and has authored two invited book chapters. Dr. Patel has also been invited to present at numerous conferences and at various hospitals all over the country.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    On Partial Leave from 04/29/2024 To 10/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Stanford University Endowed Professor for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease

    BioI am a pediatric gastroenterologist and physician scientist, who has been devoted to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) research since beginning medical training over 20 years ago. I am also Director of the Stanford Center for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease. I have expertise crossing mucosal immunology and epithelial biology, formal training and experience in clinical and translational investigation with human biospecimens, and direct insight regarding the important clinical challenges caring for children with complicated IBD. My translational research program focuses on how the immune system regulates epithelial function in chronic intestinal inflammation as it relates to IBD. My clinical research program has focused on optimization of anti-TNF therapy in pediatric IBD, and in particular acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC). My laboratory has demonstrated a protective role for IL33, a cytokine that induces type 2 cytokines from T cells an innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), in acute oxazolone colitis through preservation of epithelial goblet cells and barrier function. In line with this finding, we have also shown in a large prospective patient cohort that mucosal expression of type 2 and type 17 immune response genes distinguishes ulcerative colitis (UC) from colon-only Crohn’s disease, and that type 2 gene expression is associated with superior clinical outcome in pediatric UC. We have now developed an organoid-immune cell in vitro culture system to demonstrate the ILC2-dependent mechanism through which IL33 induces goblet cell differentiation in the intestinal epithelium. I led the multicenter study Anti-TNF for Refractory Colitis in Hospitalized Children (ARCH) Study, which aims to establish determinants of anti-TNF response in pediatric ASUC and currently Co-Chair the Crohn's & Colitis Foundations Cohort for Pediatric Translational and Clinical Research in IBD (CAPTURE IBD) and PRO-KIIDS Pediatric IBD clinical research network.

  • Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Regulation of Intestinal Development and Maturation. We study transcriptional mechanisms regulating the spatial and temporal restriction of intestine-specific gene expression during gut development. Our approach is to characterize the function of gene-specific DNA cis elements and interacting nuclear proteins in cell culture and in transgenic animals. The goal is to relate the gene-specific control mechanisms to the broader pathways specifying acquisition of gut phenotypes.

  • Sidhartha Sinha

    Sidhartha Sinha

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThere are two primary and overlapping emphases of my research, both of which are driven and united by needs-based innovation and translational potential:

    (1) Understanding the microenvironment of the inflamed versus normal gut in order to identify better therapeutic targets for people with immune-¬mediated GI disorders. Here, our investigations include understanding the influence and interactions of pharmacologic and dietary interventions on gut microbiome/metabolomic changes and the host immune response. In the context of providing patients with new understanding and solutions for their disease, I have led and advised on the design of both pilot and large clinical trials (including new FDA approved therapies) for anti-inflammatory therapies;

    (2) Applying novel approaches and technologies (including natural language processing, computer vision, and reinforcement learning) to identify and address unmet clinical needs. In this area we have ongoing and published efforts in my lab to validate and develop solutions to pressing clinical needs. We have developed/led new drug delivery technologies with a multidisciplinary team that have shown strong potential in ongoing human IBD clinical trials. My lab has utilized both supervised and unsupervised approaches to analyze social media discourse and unstructured data sets for identifying patient needs that are rarely addressed in clinical settings. We have gained insights into patient perceptions around preventative health interventions, such as health screening and diet, including the dearth of evidence-based dietary recommendations to treat IBD (despite strong patient desire for solutions in this domain).

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Alex and Susie Algard Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goals of the Sonnenburg Lab research program are to (i) elucidate the basic mechanisms that underlie dynamics within the gut microbiota and (ii) devise and implement strategies to prevent and treat disease in humans via the gut microbiota. We investigate the principles that govern gut microbial community function and interaction with the host using a broad range of experimental approaches including studies of microbiomes in diverse human cohorts.

  • Sarah Streett

    Sarah Streett

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. Sarah Streett is a Clinical Professor of Medicine, the Director of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Education at Stanford, and she is passionate about taking care of people with IBD. She is a national expert in treating complex IBD and initiated a multi-disciplinary approach to care with colorectal surgery, pediatrics, and nutrition. In 2018 she received the Champion of Hope Award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation and serves on their National Scientific Advisory Committee. Her interests focus on fertility and pregnancy in people with IBD, developing precision approaches to IBD therapy, and the role that the microbiome and diet play in its pathogenesis. She is a primary investigator of the Stanford IBD Registry and has research projects focused on optimizing clinical outcomes in IBD, the role of the microbiota and diet in IBD and pregnancy, and applying new technologies to individualizing therapy for IBD. She is also the primary investigator on multiple industry-sponsored IBD trials.

    Teaching is a top priority for Dr. Streett who feels that mentoring fellows in the development of their careers is a privilege. She has held many national leadership roles in the American Gastroenterological Association, where she has been Chair of the Practice Management and Economics Committee, and currently serves on the Government Affairs Committee. She also an appointed member of the Gastrointestinal Drug Advisory Committee at the FDA. She has represented the interests of gastroenterologists and their patients on Capitol Hill numerous times. Dr. Streett believes strongly in a collaborative approach to give patients personalized care based on the latest therapies for the treatment of IBD and is committed to mentoring the next generation of experts in the field.

  • Ali Bin Syed

    Ali Bin Syed

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    BioDr. Syed is a member of the divisions of Pediatric Radiology and Body MRI and serves as the Director of MRI for Stanford Medicine Children's Health. His clinical interests include MR imaging of pediatric and adult hepatobiliary disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, gynecologic pathology, and congenital heart disease. He is also an active researcher, collaborating with fellow engineers and scientists at Stanford to translate technical innovations in MRI into improved patient care. His recent work focuses on translation of machine learning techniques for rapid, robust MRI in children and adults.

  • Ana Vanessa Adams Wren

    Ana Vanessa Adams Wren

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioClinical Focus:
    Psychology
    Child and Adolescent Psychology
    Pediatric Pain Psychology
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease Psychology

  • Ann Ming Yeh

    Ann Ming Yeh

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioDr. Ann Ming Yeh is a Clinical Professor at Stanford University in Pediatric Gastroenterology and practices at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital and Stanford Children’s Health. She completed her residency and GI fellowship at Stanford University.

    Dr. Yeh’s research interests include diet therapies for inflammatory bowel disease, nutrition, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and integrative medicine for pediatric gastroenterology. She has presented her work on fatty liver, inflammatory bowel disease and integrative medicine at national meetings.

    She completed a two-year distance learning fellowship through the University of Arizona’s Center for Integrative Medicine where she gained additional expertise in mind-body therapies, botanicals, and nutritional supplements. With skill and compassion, Dr. Yeh treats her patients with a comprehensive, evidence-based, holistic approach. She is also a formally trained and board-certified medical acupuncturist. She is currently the program director for the nation’s premier fellowship for Pediatric Integrative Medicine at Stanford.

    Outside of medicine, she enjoys yoga, gardening, hiking, and traveling with her family.