Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)


Showing 101-150 of 269 Results

  • Jackelyn Hwang

    Jackelyn Hwang

    Assistant Professor of Sociology

    BioJackelyn Hwang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a faculty affiliate at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Urban Studies Program. Jackelyn’s main research interests are in the fields of urban sociology, race and ethnicity, immigration, and inequality. In particular, her research examines the relationship between how neighborhoods change and the persistence of neighborhood inequality by race and class in US cities. Her current projects focus on the causes and consequences of gentrification and developing automated methods for measuring neighborhood change using Google Street View imagery.

    Jackelyn received her B.A.S. in Sociology and Mathematics from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University. After completing her Ph.D., she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Office of Population Research at Princeton University. Her research has been supported by the American Sociological Association, the Joint Center for Housing Studies, the National Science Foundation, among others. Her work has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Demography, Social Forces, and other academic journals.

  • Daniel Imler

    Daniel Imler

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in understanding the impact of smart, agile clinical pathways to drive behavior change among providers.

  • Ramesh Johari

    Ramesh Johari

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioJohari is broadly interested in the design, economic analysis, and operation of online platforms, as well as statistical and machine learning techniques used by these platforms (such as search, recommendation, matching, and pricing algorithms).

  • Amit Kaushal

    Amit Kaushal

    Adjunct Professor, Bioengineering

    BioAmit Kaushal, MD, PhD is Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine (Stanford-VA) and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University. Dr. Kaushal's work spans clinical medicine, teaching, research, and industry.

    He helped launch Stanford School of Engineering's undergraduate major in Biomedical Computation (bmc.stanford.edu) and has served as long-time director of the major. The major has graduated over 70 students since inception and was recently featured in Nature (https://go.nature.com/2P2UnRu).

    His research interests are in utilizing health data in novel and ethical ways to improve the practice of medicine. He is a faculty executive member of Stanford's Partnership for AI-Assisted Care (aicare.stanford.edu). Recently, he has also been working with public health agencies to improve scale and speed of contact tracing for COVID-19.

    He has previously held executive and advisory roles at startups working at the interface of technology and healthcare.

    He continues to practice as an academic hospitalist.

    Dr. Kaushal completed his BS (Biomedical Computation), MD, PhD (Biomedical Informatics), and residency training at Stanford. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Clinical Informatics.

  • Monroe Kennedy III

    Monroe Kennedy III

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is to develop technology that improves everyday life by anticipating and acting on the needs of human counterparts. My research can be divided into the following sub-categories: robotic assistants, connected devices and intelligent wearables. My Assistive Robotics and Manipulation lab focuses heavily on both the analytical and experimental components of assistive technology design.

  • Khizer Khaderi MD, MPH

    Khizer Khaderi MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Ophthalmology

    BioDr. Khizer Khaderi is a Clinical Associate Professor at the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University. Khaderi is the Director/Founder of the Stanford Human Perception Laboratory (HPL) and the Stanford Vision Performance Center (VPC). He also serves as faculty at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI and the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance (HPA)

    Khaderi is a renowned Neuro-Ophthalmic surgeon, technologist and futurist. Khaderi has extensive domain expertise in artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), mixed reality (MxR), wearables, gaming, Web3, applied neuroscience, human factors, and human-machine interfaces/interaction. His research interests include developing personalized human intelligent systems based on the human brain and sensory systems, developing technologies to optimize human performance, and combining biological and computational principles to expand our capabilities in research, clinical practice, and everyday life. Dr. Khaderi's approach to advance research interests and develop practical applications for everyday use is building technology, companies and collaborative partnerships across academia and industry.

    Dr. Khaderi’s experience across industry sectors include consumer electronics, gaming, retail, life science, sports/Esports health care, Pharma, e-commerce, to name a few. He has developed novel technologies in these areas, and generated multiple invention patents. Selected as a “40 under 40”, he contributed to President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology regarding vision technology and the aging population. He also advises multiple companies, venture firms and organizations including the Global Esports Federation, Magic Leap, Riot Games, Intel, Activision, Unity, Epic Games, Google, FB, Microsoft, Apple, NBA, Aerie Pharma, the World Health Organization, and the World Bank.

  • Oussama Khatib

    Oussama Khatib

    Weichai Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioRobotics research on novel control architectures, algorithms, sensing, and human-friendly designs for advanced capabilities in complex environments. With a focus on enabling robots to interact cooperatively and safely with humans and the physical world, these studies bring understanding of human movements for therapy, athletic training, and performance enhancement. Our work on understanding human cognitive task representation and physical skills is enabling transfer for increased robot autonomy. With these core capabilities, we are exploring applications in healthcare and wellness, industry and service, farms and smart cities, and dangerous and unreachable settings -- deep in oceans, mines, and space.

  • Jennifer King

    Jennifer King

    HAI Privacy and Data Policy Fellow

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI research information privacy from the user's perspective (HCI) across multiple domains, including: online commercial contexts, IoT/Ubicomp, human genetics. I conduct both theoretical and applied privacy research, with a focus on the impacts of law and policy on privacy. My dissertation research explored the effects of social structures (such as power differentials) on individuals' decisions to disclose personal information in commercial contexts.

  • Kevin Klyman

    Kevin Klyman

    Master of Arts Student in International Policy, admitted Autumn 2023
    Other Tech - Graduate (9105), Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI)

    BioKevin Klyman is a JD-MA candidate at Harvard Law School and Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute. He is also the Lead Technology Researcher at Harvard's Avoiding Great Power War Project, an Emerging Expert at the Forum on the Arms Trade, and part of the policy team at Stanford's Center for Research on Foundation Models. His research focuses on the regulation of large AI models and the competition in emerging technology between the US, China, and Europe.

    Klyman’s writing on US-China relations has been published in Foreign Policy, TechCrunch, Just Security, The American Prospect, The Diplomat, Inkstick, The National Interest, and South China Morning Post among others. He is the author of “The Great Tech Rivalry: China vs. the US” with Professor Graham Allison, which has been cited by The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, and NPR.

    Klyman's research at Stanford covers the level of transparency of foundation model developers, the policies companies employ to restrict how their models are used, and government regulation of AI. His recent report with Professor Percy Liang, "Do Foundation Model Providers Comply with the Draft EU AI Act?", is one of the most thorough analyses of how European AI regulation applies to large AI models.

    At Harvard, Klyman has published on issues including compute governance, quantum computing export controls, digital trade agreements, and clean energy supply chains. Klyman was the inaugural recipient of the Belfer Center's Lovita Strain Award for Advancing Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging in recognition of his work to promote equity as a leader on Belfer's DIB Committee.

    Klyman has led tech policy initiatives for a variety of the world’s leading international organizations. As an Artificial Intelligence and Digital Rights Fellow at United Nations Global Pulse, the AI lab of the UN Secretary-General, he headed the organization’s work on national AI strategies and coordinated the UN’s Privacy Policy Group. Klyman helped lead the development of a risks, harms, and benefits assessment for algorithmic systems that is now used across the UN. After the onset of the pandemic, Klyman coauthored a new privacy policy in partnership with the World Health Organization—the “Joint Statement on Data Protection and Privacy in the COVID-19 Response”—which was adopted by the UN as a whole.

    As a Policy Fellow at the UN Foundation’s Digital Impact Alliance, Klyman built a database that is now used by the World Bank and the UN Development Programme to assess countries' readiness for digital investment. At the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, Klyman directed research on countries’ policies regarding autonomous weapons, resulting in the landmark report “Stopping Killer Robots: Country Positions on Banning Fully Autonomous Weapons and Retaining Human Control.”

    Klyman has also worked on a wide range of issues aside from technology. At Human Rights Watch, he helped expose war crimes in Syria and Yemen through open-source intelligence gathering and coauthored a report about the illegal use of cluster munitions. As a Legislative Assistant to the Mayor of Berkeley, California, he drafted a dozen pieces of legislation that nearly doubled the city’s investments in affordable housing.

    Klyman attended UC Berkeley as an undergraduate, graduating with highest honors in political science along with a degree in applied mathematics concentrating in computer science. He is an award-winning debater who achieved the highest ranking in Berkeley’s history in American parliamentary debate and was Co-President of Berkeley’s parliamentary debate team. His thesis on Chinese foreign policy won the Owen D. Young Prize as the top paper in international relations and he received the John Gardner Public Service Fellowship as one of Berkeley’s top three public service-oriented graduates. He serves as Co-President of the John Gardner Fellowship Association, a 501(c)3.

  • Brian Knutson

    Brian Knutson

    Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab and I seek to elucidate the neural basis of emotion (affective neuroscience), and explore implications for decision-making (neuroeconomics) and psychopathology (neurophenomics).

  • Mykel Kochenderfer

    Mykel Kochenderfer

    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioMykel Kochenderfer is Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. Prior to joining the faculty, he was at MIT Lincoln Laboratory where he worked on airspace modeling and aircraft collision avoidance, with his early work leading to the establishment of the ACAS X program. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh and B.S. and M.S. degrees in computer science from Stanford University. Prof. Kochenderfer is the director of the Stanford Intelligent Systems Laboratory (SISL), conducting research on advanced algorithms and analytical methods for the design of robust decision making systems. Of particular interest are systems for air traffic control, unmanned aircraft, and other aerospace applications where decisions must be made in uncertain, dynamic environments while maintaining safety and efficiency. Research at SISL focuses on efficient computational methods for deriving optimal decision strategies from high-dimensional, probabilistic problem representations. He is an author of "Decision Making under Uncertainty: Theory and Application" (2015), "Algorithms for Optimization" (2019), and "Algorithms for Decision Making" (2022), all from MIT Press. He is a third generation pilot.

  • Rohini Kosoglu

    Rohini Kosoglu

    Biodesign Collaborator, School of Medicine - MDRP'S - Biodesign Program

    BioRohini Kosoglu is a leading national expert on domestic policy and veteran of the White House, Congress, and presidential campaigns. She currently serves as a Policy Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) and Director of Public Policy and Political Affairs at the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign. She is also a Venture Partner at Fusion Fund, a venture firm that focuses on early-stage technology and health care investments. Kosoglu has been at the forefront of driving transformative change in social, technology, and economic policy over the last two decades. She also has the distinction of being the first South Asian American woman to hold the roles of both Domestic Policy Advisor to the Vice President and Chief of Staff in the United States Senate.

    Kosoglu recently served as Deputy Assistant to the President and Domestic Policy Advisor to the Vice President. In this role, Kosoglu became the first Asian American woman to hold this position. She led and promoted initiatives on behalf of the President and Vice President to strengthen democracy, advance gender and racial equity, and create economic mobility for millions of American workers and families. Kosoglu also served as a key advisor during the creation and implementation of the American Rescue Plan, including the national response to the COVID-19 crisis, the CHIPS Act, the AI Bill of Rights, the bipartisan infrastructure law and the Cancer Moonshot. On behalf of the Vice President, she helped forge a number of public-private partnerships in the White House, ultimately driving billions of private sector dollars towards national priorities of the President and Vice President and leveraged the strengths of both the government and private-sector. Vice President Harris praised Kosoglu as “a brilliant and trusted leader” who “brought vision, strategic judgement, and a depth of experience as our Administration has addressed some of the most urgent challenges facing our nation.”

    Earlier, Kosoglu made history as the first South Asian American woman to serve as Chief of Staff in the United States Senate under then-U.S. Senator Kamala Harris. She managed hearing preparations for some of the highest-profile Senate hearings over the last decade including investigations around data privacy, cybersecurity, and social media interference during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as Supreme Court nomination hearings. Additionally, under her organizational leadership, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies named Harris’ office under Kosoglu's tenure as the most diverse in the U.S. Senate.

    Kosoglu’s career in the United States Congress has also included over a decade of leadership positions crafting social, economic, and technology policy initiatives with senior Democratic Senators, including U.S. Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado and U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow of Michigan. Notably, Kosoglu was a key negotiator during the passage of the historic Affordable Care Act. She also was a lead negotiator and drafter during the reform of the Food and Drug Administration which led to landmark designations for approval of innovative drugs and devices, known today as Breakthrough Therapies and Breakthrough Devices, respectively, as well as laws to strengthen patient-centered care in the 21st Century Cures Act.

    Kosoglu was a former resident fellow at the Harvard Institute of Politics at the Kennedy School and received her bachelor’s degree with honors from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree from George Washington University. She serves on several nonprofit boards and advises across the public and private sectors.

  • Anshul Kundaje

    Anshul Kundaje

    Associate Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop statistical and machine learning frameworks to learn predictive, dynamic and causal models of gene regulation from heterogeneous functional genomics data.

  • Monica Lam

    Monica Lam

    Kleiner Perkins, Mayfield, Sequoia Capital Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Monica Lam is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and the Faculty Director of the Stanford Open Virtual Assistant Laboratory. Dr. Monica Lam obtained her BS degree in computer science from University of British Columbia, and her PhD degree in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1987. She joined Stanford in 1988.

    Professor Lam's current research is on conversational virtual assistants with an emphasis on privacy protection. Her research uses deep learning to map task-oriented natural language dialogues into formal semantics, represented by a new executable programming language called ThingTalk. Her Almond virtual assistant, trained on open knowledge graphs and IoT API standards, can be easily customized to perform new tasks. She is leading an Open Virtual Assistant Initiative to create the largest, open, crowdsourced language semantics model to promote open access in all languages. Her decentralized Almond virtual assistant that supports fine-grain sharing with privacy has received Popular Science's Best of What's New Award in Security in 2019.

    Prof. Lam is also an expert in compilers for high-performance machines. Her pioneering work of affine partitioning provides a unifying theory to the field of loop transformations for parallelism and locality. Her software pipelining algorithm is used in commercial systems for instruction level parallelism. Her research team created the first, widely adopted research compiler, SUIF. She is a co-author of the classic compiler textbook, popularly known as the “dragon book”. She was on the founding team of Tensilica, now a part of Cadence.

    Dr. Lam is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and an Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow.

  • Eric Lambin

    Eric Lambin

    George and Setsuko Ishiyama Provostial Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment
    On Leave from 01/01/2024 To 03/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study human-environment interactions in land systems by linking remote sensing, GIS and socio-economic data. I aim at better understanding causes and impacts of changes in tropical forests, drylands, and farming systems. I currently focus on land use transitions – i.e., the shift from deforestation (or land degradation) to reforestation (or land sparing for nature), – the influence of globalization on land use decisions, and the interactions between public and private governance of land use.

  • James Landay

    James Landay

    Anand Rajaraman and Venky Harinarayan Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLanday's current research interests include Technology to Support Behavior Change (especially for health and sustainability), Demonstrational User Interfaces, Mobile & Ubiquitous Computing, Cross-Cultural Interface Design, Human-Centered AI, and User Interface Design Tools. He has developed tools, techniques, and a top professional book on Web Interface Design.

  • Curtis Langlotz

    Curtis Langlotz

    Professor of Radiology (Thoracic Imaging), of Biomedical Informatics Research, of Biomedical Data Science and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the use of deep neural networks and other machine learning technologies to help radiologists detect disease and eliminate diagnostic errors. My laboratory is developing deep neural networks that detect and classify disease on medical images. We also develop natural language processing methods that use the narrative radiology report to create large annotated image training sets for supervised machine learning experiments.

  • Victor R. Lee

    Victor R. Lee

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAI literacy, data literacy, quantified self, maker education, conceptual change in science, elementary computer science education

  • Mark Lemley

    Mark Lemley

    William Neukom Professor of Law and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsintellectual property, Internet, and antitrust law; law and AI/robotics

  • Jure Leskovec

    Jure Leskovec

    Professor of Computer Science

    BioJure Leskovec is Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. He is affiliated with the Stanford AI Lab, Machine Learning Group and the Center for Research on Foundation Models. In the past, he served as a Chief Scientist at Pinterest and was an investigator at Chan Zuckerberg BioHub. Leskovec recently pioneered the field of Graph Neural Networks and co-authored PyG, the most widely-used graph neural network library. Research from his group has been used by many countries to fight COVID-19 pandemic, and has been incorporated into products at Facebook, Pinterest, Uber, YouTube, Amazon, and more.

    His research received several awards including Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship in 2011, Okawa Research award in 2012, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in 2012, Lagrange Prize in 2015, and ICDM Research Contributions Award in 2019. His research contributions have spanned social networks, data mining and machine learning, and computational biomedicine with the focus on drug discovery. His work has won 12 best paper awards and 5 10-year test of time awards at a premier venues in these research areas.

    Leskovec received his bachelor's degree in computer science from University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, PhD in machine learning from Carnegie Mellon University and postdoctoral training at Cornell University.

  • Margaret Levi

    Margaret Levi

    Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMargaret Levi is Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow, Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, the former Sara Miller McCune Director and current Faculty Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS), Senior Fellow of the Woods Institute, and co-director of Ethics, Society and Technology, Stanford University. She is Jere L. Bacharach Professor Emerita of International Studies in the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington. She held the Chair in Politics, the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, 2009-13. At the University of Washington, she was director of the CHAOS (Comparative Historical Analysis of Organizations and States) Center and formerly the Harry Bridges Chair and Director of the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies.

    Levi is the winner of the 2019 Johan Skytte Prize and 2020 Falling Walls Prize for Breakthrough of the Year in Social Sciences and Humanities. She became a fellow of the National Academy of Sciences in 2015, the British Academy in 2022, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001, the American Academy of Political and Social Science in 2017, and the American Philosophical Society in 2018. She was a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow in 2002. She served as president of the American Political Science Association from 2004 to 2005. She is the recipient of the 2014 William H. Riker Prize for Political Science. In 2019 she received an honorary doctorate from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 2019.

    Levi is the author or coauthor of numerous articles and six books, including Of Rule and Revenue (University of California Press, 1988); Consent, Dissent, and Patriotism (Cambridge University Press, 1997); Analytic Narratives (Princeton University Press, 1998); Cooperation Without Trust? (Russell Sage, 2005), In the Interest of Others (Princeton, 2013), and A Moral Political Economy (Cambridge, 2021). She explores how organizations and governments provoke member willingness to act beyond material interest.

    She was the general editor of Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics. She is co-general editor of the Annual Review of Political Science and on the editorial board of PNAS.. Levi serves on the boards of the: Berggruen Institute: Center for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (CEACS) in Madrid; Research Council of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), and CORE Economics. Levi and her husband, Robert Kaplan, are avid collectors of Australian Aboriginal art. Ancestral Modern, an exhibition drawn from their collection, was on view at the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) in 2012. Yale University Press and SAM co-published the catalog.

    Her fellowships include the Woodrow Wilson in 1968, German Marshall in 1988-9, and the Center for Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences in 1993-1994. She has lectured and been a visiting fellow at the Australian National University, the European University Institute, the Max Planck Institute in Cologne, the Juan March Institute, the Budapest Collegium, Cardiff University, Oxford University, Bergen University, and Peking University. She was a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar in 2005-6. She periodically serves as a consultant to the World Bank.

  • Ron Li

    Ron Li

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine

    BioRon Li is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hospital Medicine and Center for Biomedical Informatics Research at Stanford University School of Medicine. As the Medical Informatics Director for Digital Health at Stanford Health Care, he provides medical and informatics direction for the health system's enterprise digital health portfolio, including expanding digital referral networks and virtual care modalities. He is the co-founder and Director for the Stanford Emerging Applications Lab (SEAL), which helps clinicians and staff build ideas into novel digital products that are prototyped and tested for care delivery at Stanford Health Care.

    Ron's academic interests focus on the "delivery science" of new technological capabilities such as digital and artificial intelligence in healthcare and how to design, implement, and evaluate new tech enabled models of care delivery. Ron's work spans across multiple disciplines, including clinical medicine, data science, digital health, information technology, design thinking, process improvement, and implementation science. He has consulted for various companies in the digital health and artificial intelligence space and is leading work in AI and user experience research in partnership with Google. He is an attending physician on the inpatient medicine teaching service at Stanford Hospital and is a core faculty for the Stanford Clinical Informatics Fellowship.

  • Percy Liang

    Percy Liang

    Associate Professor of Computer Science, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI, and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Statistics

    BioPercy Liang is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University (B.S. from MIT, 2004; Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, 2011). His two research goals are (i) to make machine learning more robust, fair, and interpretable; and (ii) to make computers easier to communicate with through natural language. His awards include the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2019), IJCAI Computers and Thought Award (2016), an NSF CAREER Award (2016), a Sloan Research Fellowship (2015), and a Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship (2014).