School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-50 of 85 Results

  • Nicholas Haber

    Nicholas Haber

    Assistant Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use AI models of of exploratory and social learning in order to better understand early human learning and development, and conversely, I use our understanding of early human learning to make robust AI models that learn in exploratory and social ways. Based on this, I develop AI-powered learning tools for children, geared in particular towards the education of those with developmental issues such as the Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in the mold of my work on the Autism Glass Project. My formal graduate training in pure mathematics involved extending partial differential equation theory in cases involving the propagation of waves through complex media such as the space around a black hole. Since then, I have transitioned to the use of machine learning in developing both learning tools for children with developmental disorders and AI and cognitive models of learning.

  • Stephen Haber

    Stephen Haber

    A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioStephen Haber is the A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. In addition, he is a professor of political science, professor of history, and professor of economics (by courtesy).

    Haber has spent his career investigating why the world distribution of income so uneven. His papers have been published in economics, history, political science, and law journals.
    He is the author of five books and the editor of six more. Haber’s most recent books include Fragile by Design with Charles Calomiris (Princeton University Press), which examines how governments and industry incumbents often craft banking regulatory policies in ways that stifle competition and increase systemic risk. The Battle Over Patents (Oxford University Press), a volume edited with Naomi Lamoreaux, documents the development of US-style patent systems and the political fights that have shaped them.

    His latest project focuses on a long-standing puzzle in the social sciences: why are prosperous democracies not randomly distributed across the planet, but rather, are geographically clustered? Haber and his coauthors answer this question by using geospatial tools to simulate the ecological conditions that shaped pre-industrial food production and trade. They then employ machine learning methods to elucidate the relationship between ecological conditions and the levels of economic development that emerged across the globe over the past three centuries.

    Haber holds a Ph.D. in history from UCLA and has been on the Stanford faculty since 1987.
    From 1995 to 1998, he served as associate dean for the social sciences and director of Graduate Studies of Stanford’s School of Humanities and Sciences. He is among Stanford’s most distinguished teachers, having been awarded every teaching prize Stanford has to offer.

  • Heather Hadlock

    Heather Hadlock

    Associate Professor of Music

    BioHeather Hadlock studies 18th- and 19th-century French and Italian opera, with a focus on changing norms for representing masculinity in opera on nineteenth century stages and in contemporary productions of classic operas. Her research repertoire encompasses Italian bel canto opera, Berlioz, Offenbach, operatic masculinities, opera in the age of its digital mediation, and divas and technology. She approaches operatic voices and performance through feminist theories of difference, vocality, and embodiment; gender and sexuality studies; and dynamics of adaptation between opera, literature, and video. She has directed Stanford's interdisciplinary Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and served on the Phiip Brett Award committee and board of the AMS LGBTQ Study Group. She serves on the editorial board of the journal Nineteenth-Century Music.

  • Elizabeth Hadly

    Elizabeth Hadly

    Paul S. and Billie Achilles Professor of Environmental Biology, Professor of Earth System Science, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElizabeth Hadly and her lab probe how perturbations such as climatic change and human modification of the environment influence the evolution and ecology of animals.

  • Jens Hainmueller

    Jens Hainmueller

    Kimberly Glenn Professor and Professor of Political Science

    BioJens Hainmueller is the Kimberly Glenn Professor in Political Science and Director of Graduate Studies of the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He is the Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford Immigration Policy Lab that is focused on the design and evaluation of immigration and integration policies and programs.

    His research interests include statistical methods, causal inference, immigration, and political economy. He has published over 65 articles, many of them in top general science journals (e.g. Science, Nature, PNAS) and top field journals in political science, statistics, economics, and business. His statistical methods are used by organizations to conduct causal inferences in various settings. He has also published multiple open source software packages. His research has received funding from organizations such as Schmidt Futures, the Robin Hood Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Health, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research has won various awards including the Gosnell Prize for Excellence in Political Methodology, the Warren Miller Prize, the Robert H. Durr award, and the Emerging Scholar award by the Society of Political Methodology. He was selected as an Andrew Carnegie Fellow and inducted as a Fellow of the Society of Political Methodology. He has received an honorary degree from the European University Institute (EUI).

    Hainmueller received his PhD from Harvard University and also studied at the London School of Economics, Brown University, and the University of Tübingen. Before joining Stanford, he served on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  • Andrew Hall

    Andrew Hall

    Davies Family Professor, Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    BioAndrew Hall is a Professor of Political Economy at the Graduate School of Business and a Professor of Political Science. He is the co-director of the Democracy & Polarization Lab and a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Hall combines large-scale quantitative datasets with tools from economics, statistics, and machine learning to understand how to design democratic systems of governance, with a focus on American elections and legislatures as well as the governance of online communities.

  • Robert Hall

    Robert Hall

    Robert and Carole McNeil Endowed Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    BioI’m an applied economist with interests in employment, technology, competition, and economic policy in the aggregate economy and in particular markets.

    I served as President of the American Economic Association for the year 2010. I presented the Ely Lecture to the Association in 2001 and served as Vice President in 2005. I’m a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Distinguished Fellow of the AEA, and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and the Society of Labor Economists.

    Along with my Hoover Institution colleague Alvin Rabushka, I developed a framework for equitable and efficient consumption taxation. Our article in the Wall Street Journal in December 1981 was the starting point for an upsurge of interest in consumption taxation. Our book, The Flat Tax (free download from the Hoover Institution Press) spells out the proposal. We were recognized in Money magazine’s Hall of Fame for our contributions to financial innovation.

    Marc Lieberman and I have a college textbook, Economics: Principles and Applications, now in its sixth edition.

    I also served as director of the research program on economic fluctuations and growth of the National Bureau of Economic Research from 1977 through 2013. I continue to serve as chairman of the Bureau's Committee on Business Cycle Dating, which maintains the semiofficial chronology of the U.S. business cycle.

    I have advised a number of government agencies on national economic policy, including the Justice Department, the Treasury Department, the Federal Reserve Board, and the Congressional Budget Office, where I serve on the Advisory Committee. I served on the National Presidential Advisory Committee on Productivity. I have testified on numerous occasions before congressional committees concerning national economic policy.

    Before coming to Stanford’s Hoover Institution and the Department of Economics in 1978, I taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at the University of California, Berkeley. I was born in Palo Alto, attended school there and in Los Angeles, received my B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and my Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    In a 1976 paper, I introduced the distinction between fresh-water and salt-water economists. Bloggers using these terms are asked to contribute $1 to a fund that sends graduate students to MIT for one year and to the University of Minnesota for a second year.

    I am married to economist Susan Woodward, chairman of Sand Hill Econometrics, and live in Menlo Park, California. Visit our blog for pictures and information about our visits to places with villages, ruins, and good food.

  • MarYam Hamedani, PhD

    MarYam Hamedani, PhD

    Executive Director & Senior Research Scientist

    BioI am a social psychologist with experience leading centers and teams within higher ed. I study and put into practice strategies to help people live, work, and thrive in today’s increasingly diverse and divided world. My expertise is in harnessing the power of culture to support organizational and societal change and disrupting cultural defaults that lead to bias and inequality. My research has been published in peer-reviewed journals, covered by national media outlets, and supported by leading foundations.

    As Executive Director and Senior Research Scientist at Stanford SPARQ, I oversee the center’s team and projects. I partner with practitioners in criminal justice, education, economic mobility, education, health, media, and technology to leverage behavioral science insights to drive change. I prioritize an approach to research that is grounded in society’s most pressing problems and centers the perspectives of practitioners working to lead change on the ground. I create opportunities for researchers and practitioners to learn from one another in mutually beneficial partnerships. I also regularly speak and advise on how social science research on race, culture, and inequality can drive strategies for change.

    Before Stanford SPARQ, I was Associate Director of Stanford’s Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) and Stanford's Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE). I am a Stanford Ph.D. alum in Social Psychology.

  • James Hamilton

    James Hamilton

    Hearst Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedia economics, journalism, economics of regulation

  • Philip C. Hanawalt

    Philip C. Hanawalt

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor in Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current interest includes two principal areas:

    1. The molecular basis for diseases in which the pathway of transcription-coupled DNA repair is defective, including Cockyne syndrome (CS) and UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS). Patients are severely sensitive to sunlight but get no cancers. See Hanawalt & Spivak, 2008, for review.

    2. Transcription arrest by guanine-rich DNA sequences and non-canonical secondary structures. Transcription collisions with replication forks.

  • Thomas Hansen

    Thomas Hansen

    Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAnthropology of political life, ethno-religious identities, violence and urban life in South Asia and Southern Africa. Multiple theoretical and disciplinary interests from political theory and continental philosophy to psychoanalysis, comparative religion and contemporary urbanism

  • Eric Hanushek

    Eric Hanushek

    Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioEric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He is internationally recognized for his economic analysis of educational issues, and his research has broadly influenced education policy in both developed and developing countries. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field, he was awarded the prestigious Yidan Prize for Education Research in 2021. His extensive and well-cited body of work encompasses many pivotal topics within education, including class size reduction, school accountability, and teacher effectiveness. His pioneering exploration into teacher effectiveness, quantified through students' learning gains, laid the foundation for the widespread adoption of value-added measures in evaluating educators and institutions. His seminal book, The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth, establishes the close relationship between a nation's long-term economic growth and the skill levels of its populace. His scholarly contributions include twenty-six books and over 300 articles contributing to knowledge within the field. He is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and completed his Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (https://hanushek.stanford.edu/)

  • Gabriella M. Harari

    Gabriella M. Harari

    Assistant Professor of Communication

    BioGabriella Harari is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at Stanford University, where she directs the Media and Personality Lab.

    She studies how personality is expressed in the physical and digital contexts of everyday life. Much of her research is focused on understanding what digital technologies reveal about who we are, and how use of digital technologies shapes who we are. Her current projects analyze people’s everyday behavioral patterns (e.g., social interactions, mobility) and environmental contexts (e.g., places visited, social media platforms) to show how they are associated with individual differences in personality and well-being.

    Harari takes an ecological approach to conducting her research, emphasizing the importance of studying people and their behavior in natural contexts. To that end, she conducts intensive longitudinal field studies and is interested in mobile sensing methods and analytic techniques that combine approaches from the social and computer sciences. For example, methodologies she uses in her work in include surveys, experience sampling, longitudinal modeling, mobile sensing, data mining, and machine learning.

    Harari completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship and earned her PhD at the Department of Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin. She completed her BA in Psychology & Humanities from Florida International University, where she was also a Ronald E. McNair Scholar. Her work has been published in academic outlets such as Perspectives in Psychological Science, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and the Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies (IMWUT). Her work has also been supported by the National Science Foundation and Stanford HAI Seed Grant Awards.

  • Keren Haroush

    Keren Haroush

    Assistant Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies the mechanisms by which highly complex behaviors are mediated at the neuronal level, mainly focusing on the example of dynamic social interactions and the neural circuits that drive them. From dyadic interactions to group dynamics and collective decision making, the lab seeks a mechanistic understanding for the fundamental building blocks of societies, such as cooperation, empathy, fairness and reciprocity.

  • Stephen Harrison

    Stephen Harrison

    Senior Lecturer in Music

    BioStudied with George Neikrug, Andor Toth, Jr., Margaret Rowell, Eugene Lehner.

    Artistic Director, Ives Collective (2015-)
    Founding member, Ives String Quartet. Cellist (1998-2015)
    Founding member, Stanford String Quartet (1983-1997).

    Solo cellist, San Francisco Contemporary Music Players.

    Former principal, the Chamber Symphony of San Francisco, New England Chamber Orchestra, The Opera Company of Boston.

    Principal cellist, Mendocino Music Festival; Faculty coach, Emerging Artists Program, Mendocino Music Festival
    Faculty member, SoCal Chamber Music Workshop
    Cellist, Telluride Chamber Music Festival

    Former faculty/cellist at the Rocky Ridge Music Center, Centrum/Port Townsend (WA),

    Recordings for CRI, Laurel Records, New Albion, AIX Entertainment, Delos, Centaur, and Music and Arts Recordings of America.

  • Bard Harstad

    Bard Harstad

    David S. Lobel Professor in Business and Sustainability, Professor at the Doerr School of Sustainability and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioWith a PhD from Stockholm University, Harstad taught at Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2004-2012, and then at the University of Oslo 2012-2023, before joining the GSB in 2023. His fields include political economics, environmental economics, and applied theory. Specific research projects include the design of international agreements, trade agreements and climate agreements, supply-side environmental policies, and policies that motivate environmental conservation and reducing deforestation.

  • Trevor Hastie

    Trevor Hastie

    John A. Overdeck Professor, Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFlexible statistical modeling for prediction and representation of data arising in biology, medicine, science or industry. Statistical and machine learning tools have gained importance over the years. Part of Hastie's work has been to bridge the gap between traditional statistical methodology and the achievements made in machine learning.

  • Patrick Hayden

    Patrick Hayden

    Stanford Professor of Quantum Physics

    BioProfessor Hayden is a leader in the exciting new field of quantum information science. He has contributed greatly to our understanding of the absolute limits that quantum mechanics places on information processing, and how to exploit quantum effects for computing and other aspects of communication. He has also made some key insights on the relationship between black holes and information theory.

  • Catherine Heaney

    Catherine Heaney

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Psychology and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEnhancing our understanding of psychosocial factors at work (occupational stress, social support at work, organizational justice, organizational empowerment) that are associated with health and disease.

    Developing effective strategies for enhancing employee resiliency and reducing exposure to psychological and behavioral risk factors at work.

  • Gabrielle Hecht

    Gabrielle Hecht

    Stanton Foundation Professor of Nuclear Security and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioGabrielle Hecht is Professor of History, Professor (by courtesy) of Anthropology, and Senior Fellow at FSI. She is President of the Society for the History of Technology.

    Hecht's research explores the inside-out Earth and its wastes in order to reveal the hidden costs of the so-called "energy transition," with research sites in the Arctic, the Andes, southern Africa, and west Africa. Her new book, Residual Governance: How South African Foretells Planetary Futures (Duke, 2023), received the 2024 PROSE Award in Government and Politics from the Association of American Publishers.

    Hecht's graduate courses include colloquia on "Power in the Anthropocene," "Infrastructure and Power in the Global South," "Technopolitics," and "Materiality and Power." She supervises dissertations in science and technology studies (STS), transnational history, and African studies. Her undergraduate course in "Racial Justice in the Nuclear Age" was built in partnership with the Bayview Hunters Point Community Advocates (BVHPCA).

    Hecht’s 2012 book Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade offers new perspectives on the global nuclear order by focusing on African uranium mines and miners. It received awards from the Society for the Social Studies of Science, the American Historical Association, the American Sociological Association, and the Suzanne M. Glasscock Humanities Institute, as well as an honorable mention from the African Studies Association. An abridged version appeared in French as Uranium Africain, une histoire globale (Le Seuil 2016), and a Japanese translation is due out in 2021. Her first book, The Radiance of France: Nuclear Power and National Identity (1998/ 2nd ed 2009), explores how the French embedded nuclear policy in reactor technology, and nuclear culture in reactor operations. It received awards from the American Historical Association and the Society for the History of Technology, and has appeared in French as Le rayonnement de la France: Énergie nucléaire et identité nationale après la seconde guerre mondiale (2004/ 2014).

    Her affiliations at Stanford include the Center for African Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, the Center for Global Ethnography, the Program on Urban Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought and Literature. Hecht taught in the University of Michigan’s History department for 18 years, where she helped to found and direct UM’s Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS). She served as associate director of UM’s African Studies Center, and participated in its long-term collaboration with the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (South Africa).

    Hecht holds a PhD in History and Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania (1992), and a bachelor’s degree in Physics from MIT (1986). She’s been a visiting scholar in universities in Australia, France, the Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, and Sweden. Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council for Learned Societies, and the South African and Dutch national research foundations, among others. She serves on numerous advisory boards, including for the Andra, France’s national radioactive waste management agency.

  • Siegfried Hecker

    Siegfried Hecker

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsplutonium science; nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship; cooperative threat reduction

  • Tony Heinz

    Tony Heinz

    Professor of Applied Physics, of Photon Science, and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsElectronic properties and dynamics of nanoscale materials, ultrafast lasers and spectroscopy.

  • H. Craig Heller

    H. Craig Heller

    Lorry I. Lokey/Business Wire Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurobiology of sleep, circadian rhythms, regulation of body temperature, mammalian hibernation, and human exercise physiology. Currently applying background in sleep and circadian neurobiology the understanding and correcting the learning disability of Down Syndrome.

  • Thomas Heller

    Thomas Heller

    Lewis Talbot and Nadine Hearn Shelton Professor of International Legal Studies, Emeritus

    BioAn expert in international law and legal institutions, Thomas C. Heller has focused his research on the rule of law, international climate control, global energy use, and the interaction of government and nongovernmental organizations in establishing legal structures in the developing world. He has created innovative courses on the role of law in transitional and developing economies, as well as the comparative study of law in developed economies. He has co-directed the law school’s Rule of Law Program, as well as the Stanford Program in International and Comparative Law. Professor Heller has been a visiting professor at the European University Institute, Catholic University of Louvain, and Hong Kong University, and has served as the deputy director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, where he is now a senior fellow.

    Professor Heller is also a senior fellow (by courtesy) at the Woods Institute for the Environment. Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 1979, he was a professor of law at the University of Wisconsin Law School and an attorney-advisor to the governments of Chile and Colombia.

  • Martin Hellman

    Martin Hellman

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioMartin E. Hellman is Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University and is affiliated with the university's Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). His most recent work, "Rethinking National Security," identifies a number of questionable assumptions that are largely taken as axiomatic truths. A key part of that work brings a risk informed framework to a potential failure of nuclear deterrence and then finds surprising ways to reduce the risk. His earlier work included co-inventing public key cryptography, the technology that underlies the secure portion of the Internet. His many honors include election to the National Academy of Engineering and receiving (jointly with his colleague Whit Diffie) the million dollar ACM Turing Award, the top prize in computer science. In 2016, he and his wife of fifty years published "A New Map for Relationships: Creating True Love at Home & Peace on the Planet," providing a “unified field theory” for peace by illuminating the connections between nuclear war, conventional war, interpersonal war, and war within our own psyches.

  • Lambertus Hesselink

    Lambertus Hesselink

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy of Applied Physics

    BioHesselink's research encompasses nano-photonics, ultra high density optical data storage, nonlinear optics, optical super-resolution, materials science, three-dimensional image processing and graphics, and Internet technologies.

  • David Hills

    David Hills

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Philosophy

    BioI did my undergraduate work at Amherst and went on to graduate school at Princeton. Since then I've taught at Harvard, UCLA, The University of Pennsylvania, The University of Michigan, Berkeley, and Stanford. I resumed my graduate career a little while back -- from a distance, as it were -- receiving the PhD in 2005.

    I'm married to another philosopher, Krista Lawlor.

    My interests continue to center in aesthetics, but they have spilled over into pretty much every branch of philosophy at one time or another.

    Wittgenstein, Culture and Value, 34: Im Rennen der Philosophie gewinnt, wer am langsamsten laufen kann. Oder: der, der das Ziel zuletzt erreicht. (In philosophy the race is to the one who can run slowest — the one who crosses the finish line last.) I'm not sure I believe this, but it's a comforting thing to read.