School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 64 Results

  • Raya Saab

    Raya Saab

    Lindhard Family Professor of Pediatric Cancer Biology

    BioOur laboratory focuses on investigating molecular mechanisms of oncogene-induced tumorigenesis and tumor suppressor pathways, and oncogenic signaling in the pediatric solid tumor rhabdomyosarcoma. Our earlier work identified the tumor suppressors p53 and p18Ink4c as inhibitors of Cyclin D1-driven tumorigenesis in a pineoblastoma model, through senescence induction, and highlighted distinct roles for the the RB and p53 pathways in induction and maintenance of oncogene-induced senescence. We also identified CDK2 as a potential target for inducing senescence in premalignant lesions to inhibit tumor progression.
    Our current focus is on studying oncogenic signaling and tumor suppression in the childhood tumor rhabdomyosarcoma, to identify key mediators of invasion and metastasis, which is the most common cause of treatment failure clinically. We use preclinical in vitro and in vivo models, including murine and human cell lines, and mouse models of disease.
    We have recently uncovered a paracrine role for rhabdomyosarcoma-secreted exosomes in impacting biology of stromal cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma-derived exosomes carry specific miRNA cargo that imparts an invasive and migratory phenotype on normal recipient fibroblasts, and proteomic analysis revealed specific and unique pathways relevant to the two different molecular rhabdomyosarcoma subtypes that are driven by distinct oncogenic pathways. We identified that the driver oncogene in fusion-positive rhabdomyosarcoma, PAX3-FOXO1, modulates exosome cargo to promote invasion, migration, and angiogenic properties, and identified specific microRNA and protein cargo acting as effectors of PAX3-FOXO1 exosome-mediated signaling, including modulation of oxidative stress response and cell survival signaling.
    Our ongoing work is focused on interrogating specific paracrine signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms of metastatic disease progression in rhabdomyosarcoma, for potential therapeutic targeting.

  • Chiara Sabatti

    Chiara Sabatti

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStatistical models and reasoning are key to our understanding of the genetic basis of human traits. Modern high-throughput technology presents us with new opportunities and challenges. We develop statistical approaches for high dimensional data in the attempt of improving our understanding of the molecular basis of health related traits.

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Elaine and John Chambers Professor of Pediatric Cancer and Professor of Genetics
    On Partial Leave from 04/22/2024 To 06/24/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Julia Salzman

    Julia Salzman

    Associate Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsstatistical computational biology focusing on splicing, cancer and microbes

  • Peter L. Santa Maria, MBBS, PhD

    Peter L. Santa Maria, MBBS, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering
    On Partial Leave from 08/01/2023 To 07/14/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study chronic suppurative otitis media, a chronic biofilm infection of the middle ear predominantly involving pseudomonas and staph aureus. We are investigating mechanisms of sensory hearing loss, host microbe interactions and trialling novel therapeutics.

    Our work in tympanic membrane regeneration has entered clinical trials.

    Novel treatments for wound healing in intra oral wounds with potential applications to prevent post tonsillectomy wound healing and oral mucositis.

  • Serena Sanulli

    Serena Sanulli

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the organizing principles of the genome and how these principles regulate cell identity and developmental switches. We combine Biochemistry and Biophysical methods such as NMR and Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange-MS with Cell Biology, and Genetics to explore genome organization across length and time scales and understand how cells leverage the diverse biophysical properties of chromatin to regulate genome function.

  • Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Kavita Sarin, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research encompasses two main areas: 1) Using next-generation RNA, whole genome, and exome sequencing, we are investigating the genetic alterations involved in skin cancer progression, response to therapy, and other clinical outcomes and 2) We are developing and implementing genome-wide genetic risk prediction assessments for skin cancer into clinical use and studying the impact of this information on patient care.

  • Peter Sarnow

    Peter Sarnow

    Burt and Marion Avery Professor of Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies virus-host interactions with an emphasis microRNA-mediated gene regulation and on translational control. The mechanism by which a liver-specific microRNA regulates hepatitis C virus genome replication is under intense scrutiny. In addition, the mechanism of internal ribosome entry in certain cellular and viral mRNAs and its biological role in growth and development is being investigated.

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Lidia Schapira

    Lidia Schapira

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Schapira is a medical oncologist with clinical expertise in the treatment of breast cancer. As the inaugural Director of Stanford's Cancer Survivorship Program, she has developed a thriving research and clinical program focused on optimizing health outcomes for people living with and beyond cancer. Dr. Schapira is interested in training future generations of physician-scientists as well as the broader community of practicing physicians through the design of innovative educational programs. Dr. Schapira's advocacy for people with cancer led to her appointment as Editor-in-Chief of the American Society of Clinical Oncology's website for the public,Cancer.Net, a position she held from 2015 until-2021. She served on the Board of Directors of the American Psychosocial Oncology Society and as Chair of the Psychosocial Interest Group of the Multinational Society for Supportive Care in Cancer. Dr. Schapira is particularily committed to reducing inequities in cancer outcomes and improve access to cancer care and cancer clinical trials. Dr. Schapira has published numerous manuscripts, lectures both nationally and internationally on issues of cancer survivorship and served as Associate Editor of the narrative section, Art of Oncology, for the Journal of Clinical Oncology from 2013 until 2023.

  • Gary Schoolnik

    Gary Schoolnik

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructure-function analysis of bacterial adhesion proteins and toxins; design and synthesis of synthetic antigens; immunobiology of human papillomaviruses

  • Liora Schultz

    Liora Schultz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioI am currently postdoctoral research fellow pursuing immunotherapy research in the oncology department at Stanford University. My clinical training as a pediatric hematology oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center highlighted the desperate need for novel therapeutic options for a subtype of aggressive pediatric leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Despite our best standard of care for AML, long term survival rates range from 50-60% with an unacceptably high relapse rate of 40%. The urgent need for novel treatments inspired me to pursue a research project in adoptive immunotherapy, genetically modifying Tcells to express artificial T cell receptors, termed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), that target AML specific antigens. In parallel to my clinical training, I constructed an AML specific CAR and demonstrated its ability to redirect T cell function mediating eradication of AML cells. As the field of CAR therapy rapidly advances, novel methods to optimize this therapeutic modality are imperative. To this end, supported by research demonstrating superior antitumor function of naïve derived effector T cells compared to central memory derived effector T cells, I am investigating whether preferential modification of naïve T cells to express CARs will generate a T cell subpopulation with increased efficacy. Consolidating my clinical and research experiences within highly academic institutes allows me to synthesize my pursuit of scientific rigor and commitment to the field of oncology, with a mission to achieve productive research and translatable results.

  • Deborah Sellmeyer

    Deborah Sellmeyer

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    BioDr. Sellmeyer is an internationally recognized expert in Metabolic Bone Disease. She is a renowned clinician who joined the Stanford faculty in 2018 as a Professor of Medicine. She has been recognized for her clinical excellence with induction into the Miller Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence while she was at Johns Hopkins. In addition to her clinical expertise, Dr. Sellmeyer maintains a research program that centers on the effect of nutrition and environmental factors on skeletal metabolism which she has investigated through both smaller CRC-based trials and large multi-center trials. Studies she has conducted have investigated the role of dietary sodium chloride, source of dietary protein (animal, vegetable, dairy, soy), role of dietary potassium and alkaline potassium salts, targeted thoracic exercises on kyphosis, whether structured exercise can prevent bone loss in premenopausal women treated for breast cancer, and studies validating nutritional assessment questionnaires. Her expertise as a clinical researcher has enabled development of a multi-disciplinary translational research team including basic scientists in the orthopedic department, junior faculty members with K grant funding, and basic scientists in the endocrine division to develop translational projects studying the effects of osteoporosis medications on basic elements of skeletal biology utilizing bone biopsies from treated individuals as well as clinical trials of novel therapies for rare bone disorders. Dr. Sellmeyer also is a esteemed educator, having received multiple teaching awards.

  • Kawin Setsompop

    Kawin Setsompop

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioKawin Setsompop is an Associate Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering. His research focuses on the development of novel MRI acquisition methods, with the goal of creating imaging technologies that can be used to help better understand brain structure and function for applications in Healthcare and Health sciences. He received his Master’s degree in Engineering Science from Oxford University and his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT. Prior to joining Stanford, he was a postdoctoral fellow and subsequently a faculty at the A.A. Martinos center for biomedical imaging, MGH, as well as part of the Harvard and MIT faculty. His group has pioneered several widely-used MRI acquisition technologies, a number of which have been successfully translated into FDA-approved clinical products on Siemens, GE, Phillips, United Imaging and Bruker MRI scanners worldwide. These technologies are being used daily to study the brain in both clinical and neuroscientific fields.

  • Ross Shachter

    Ross Shachter

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Shachter's research has focused on the representation, manipulation, and analysis of uncertainty and probabilistic reasoning in decision systems. As part of this work, he developed the DAVID influence diagram processing system for the Macintosh. He has developed models scheduling patients for cancer follow-up, and analyzing vaccination strategies for HIV and Helobacter pylori.

  • Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Nigam H. Shah, MBBS, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system.

  • Sumit Shah

    Sumit Shah

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Sumit Shah specializes in the management of advanced urologic malignancies such as prostate, kidney, bladder, and testicular cancers. He also serves as an investigator on numerous clinical trials, with a focus on novel immunotherapy agents. His academic interests also include digital health technologies and novel healthcare delivery services, both in the domestic and international setting. Dr. Shah graduated with distinction in biomedical engineering from Duke University, received his medical doctorate from Stanford University, and Masters in Public Health from Harvard University. He completed his internal medicine residency at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where he stayed on faculty for one year before returning to Stanford for his fellowship training in medical oncology, where he now serves on the faculty.

  • Shagufta Shaheen

    Shagufta Shaheen

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Shaheen specializes in the gastrointestinal malignancies and she has expertise in treating neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Following her fellowship in Hematology and Oncology, Dr Shaheen completed an advanced fellowship in Neuroendocrine tumors from Stanford University. The NET advanced fellowship is first of its kind in United State started under the leadership of Dr Pamela Kunz who is the founding Director of the Stanford Neuroendocrine Tumor Program established in 2015. After completing her advanced fellowship, Dr Shaheen joined Stanford Oncology division as Clinical Assistant Professor. Dr Shaheen is involved in further developing the neuroendocrine oncology program at Stanford which serves as a centre of excellence in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. Dr Shaheen is actively involved in clinical research and clinical trials. Dr Shaheen is also involved in taking care of patients admitted to the oncology service as well as resident and fellow teaching.

  • Kiarash Shamardani

    Kiarash Shamardani

    Ph.D. Student in Cancer Biology, admitted Summer 2019
    ADVANCE Program Leader, School of Medicine - Grad Student Support

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterested in a systems neuroscience approach to understanding the interaction of tumor cells and their microenvironment in brain cancer. I am studying the neuron-glioma interactions at the circuit level to discern how patterns of activity within a neuron-glioma network influences the behavior of the cancer as a whole.

  • Andrew A. Shelton, MD, FACS, FACRS

    Andrew A. Shelton, MD, FACS, FACRS

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMultimodality treatment of rectal cancer
    Sphincter preserving procedures for rectal cancer
    Laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery
    Surgical education

  • Jeanne Shen

    Jeanne Shen

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastrointestinal and pancreatobiliary pathology, with major emphasis on GI and pancreatic neoplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, biodesign innovation, and the application of machine learning to digital pathology.

  • Gavin Sherlock

    Gavin Sherlock

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvolution and the adaptive landscape using yeast as a model; Defining yeast transcriptomes; chromosomal evolution in hybrid yeast species

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Linda M. Dairiki Shortliffe

    Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe timing for intervention in obstruction in the infant and child is poorly understood.Our group has been interested in trying to define the risks that may be involved in obstructive and infectious uropathies and discovering early signs of damage to the urinary tract and kidney. We have explored ways of imaging the urinary tract using nonionizing radiation (US, MRI). We have studied the relationships of sex steroid hormones, pregnancy, reflux, urinary tract infection and urinary tract function.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn clinical research, Dr. Shrager studies outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, diaphragm plication, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    Dr. Shrager's lab is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Surbhi Sidana, MD

    Surbhi Sidana, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Sidana is a hematologist/oncologist who is fellowship trained in advanced hematology with an emphasis on myeloma, amyloidosis, and dysproteinemia disorders. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation & Cellular Therapy, at Stanford University School of Medicine. She leads the Myeloma Cellular Immunotherapy program at Stanford.

    Her areas of expertise include transplantation and novel cellular immunotherapies such as CAR-T-cell therapy for patients with multiple myeloma. For each patient, Dr. Sidana develops a personalized care plan designed to optimize outcomes and quality of life.

    Dr. Sidana conducts extensive research. Currently, she is conducting clinical trials of CAR-T therapy and bispecific T-cell engagers for treatment of patients with myeloma. She is studying patients’ access to CAR-T cell therapy, the financial burden of the treatment, and its impact on patients’ quality of life and cognitive function.

    Dr Sidana has received a grant from the Stanford Medicine Cancer Institute and NIH funding through the Stanford KL2 program to study adverse events of CAR-T therapy on patients and monitoring of patients undergoing CAR-T therapy using wearable devices.

    In the past, Dr. Sidana received Conquer Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology for her research on the impact of clinical trial participation on patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma. She has also received grants from the Amyloidosis Foundation and International Waldenstrom’s Macrogloulinemia Foundation to understand AL amyloidosis, a rare disease caused by buildup of an abnormal protein.

    Dr. Sidana has given presentations at regional and national conferences and her work has been published in high-impact journals.

    Dr. Sidana has been recognized for her work with many honors, including an Outstanding Hematology/Oncology Fellow award and Outstanding Research Fellow award from the Mayo Clinic.

    She is a member of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, International Myeloma Society, International Society of Amyloidosis, and American Society of Transplantation & Cellular Therapy. Dr. Sidana is often an invited speaker at patient support groups as well as symposia and workshops for her peers.

  • Arend Sidow

    Arend Sidow

    Professor of Pathology and of Genetics
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 02/21/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have a highly collaborative research program in the evolutionary genomics of cancer. We apply well-established principles of phylogenetics to cancer evolution on the basis of whole genome sequencing and functional genomics data of multiple tumor samples from the same patient. Introductions to our work and the concepts we apply are best found in the Newburger et al paper in Genome Research and the Sidow and Spies review in TIGS.

    More information can be found here: http://www.sidowlab.org

  • Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests: cancer pharmacology, mechanisms of resistance to anticancer drugs, regulation and function of MDR1 and tubulin genes, CD47 as a target for activation of anticancer macrophases, Phase I trials of new drugs, gene expression profiling of cancers

  • Bob Sinclair

    Bob Sinclair

    Charles M. Pigott Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioUsing high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Sinclair studies microelectronic and magnetic thin film microstructure.

  • Eila C. Skinner

    Eila C. Skinner

    Thomas A. Stamey Research Professor of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on outcomes in the treatment of muscle invasive and high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. This includes identifying markers of prognosis, predictive markers for response to surgery and chemotherapy, and working toward an individualized, multidisciplinary approach to disease management. I have also focused on optimizing the use of lower urinary tract reconstruction in patients undergoing cystectomy, and developing interventions to improve patient quality of life.

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Jan Skotheim

    Jan Skotheim

    Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overarching goal is to understand how cell growth triggers cell division. Linking growth to division is important because it allows cells to maintain specific size range to best perform their physiological functions. For example, red blood cells must be small enough to flow through small capillaries, whereas macrophages must be large enough to engulf pathogens. In addition to being important for normal cell and tissue physiology, the link between growth and division is misregulated in cancer.

  • Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Smith is a board-certified, fellowship-trained medical oncologist and hematologist. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

    She is a physician-scientist who conducts extensive research. She completed a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Clinical Research Training (now, the Medical Research Scholars) Program and she was a post-doctoral researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Her research focuses on studies evaluating strategies whereby donor T cells can be administered to improve outcomes following blood and marrow transplant. Specifically, she studies novel treatment strategies using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy.

    Dr. Smith has been invited to present the findings of her research at regional, national, and international conferences. At the Insights in Hematology Conference, she focused on the use of CAR T cells for blood cancers, whereas she presented her investigations on the associations between CAR T cells and the intestinal microbiome at the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Further, at the annual meeting of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy, she addressed the importance of training scientists from underrepresented populations.

    Dr. Smith has co-authored articles on topics within the field of cancer immunology, including cancer immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and CAR T cell therapy. Her work has appeared in journals, including Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood Advances, Leukemia, Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Medicine, and elsewhere.

    She serves a peer reviewer for publications in various journals, such as Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Haematologica, and ImmunoMedicine. She also has co-written chapters in books, including Pocket Oncology, Current Concepts and Controversies in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, and Advanced Concepts in Human Immunology: Prospects for Disease Control.

    Dr. Smith has also earned numerous honors. The American Society of Hematology, Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and many other professional societies and organizations have recognized her achievements as a clinician, researcher, and scholar.

    She is a member of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Subcommittee on Immunotherapy and the co-chair of the Committee on Trainees and Junior Faculty for the American Society of Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (ASTCT). Other positions in service to professional organizations include co-chairing committees and task forces dedicated to promoting diversity among hematology and cell therapy specialists.

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Samuel So, MD

    Samuel So, MD

    Lui Hac Minh Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThrough a 4 pronged comprehensive program: translational and clinical research, early detection and treatment, promoting education, awareness and immunization and building partnership, we are working towards the development of new strategies that will lead to the elimination of hepatitis B worldwide and reduce the threat and incidence of liver cancer. Current research efforts focus on evaluating potential new diagnostic and treatment markers and novel targeted therapy for primary liver cancer.

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering, of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    BioDr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.

  • Olav Solgaard

    Olav Solgaard

    Director, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory and Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioThe Solgaard group focus on design and fabrication of nano-photonics and micro-optical systems. We combine photonic crystals, optical meta-materials, silicon photonics, and MEMS, to create efficient and reliable systems for communication, sensing, imaging, and optical manipulation.

  • David Solow-Cordero

    David Solow-Cordero

    Associate Director, High-Throughput Screening, Innovative Medicines Accelerator (IMA)

    Current Role at StanfordAssociate Director, High-Throughput Screening Knowledge Center, , Sarafan ChEM-H and Innovative Medicine Accelerator (IMA)

    This high-throughput screening (HTS) laboratory allows Stanford researchers and others to discover novel modulators of targets that otherwise would not be practical in industry. The center incorporates instrumentation (purchased with NCRR NIH Instrumentation grant numbers S10RR019513, S10RR026338, S10OD025004, and S10OD026899), databases, compound libraries, and personnel whose previous sole domains were in industry.

    Among our instrumentation are a fully automated Molecular Devices ImageXpress Micro Confocal High-Content fluorescence microplate imager, with live cell, fluidics and phase contrast options, an Echo 655 Acoustic Dispense, a Thermo integrated HTS robotic system, a Caliper Life Sciences SciClone ALH3000 and an Agilent Bravo microplate liquid handler, and the BMG Clariostarplus, Tecan Infinite M1000 and M1000 PRO and Molecular Devices FlexStation II 384 fluorescence, luminescence and absorbance multimode microplate readers.

    We have over 180,000 small molecules for compound screens, 15,000 cDNAs for genomic screens, and whole genome siRNA libraries targeting the human genome (the siARRAY whole human genome siRNA library from Dharmacon, targeting 21,000 human genes) and the mouse genome (Qiagen mouse whole genome siRNA set V1 against 22,124 genes).

    The HTSKC main screening lab is located in ChEM-H W008, the cell-based assay development lab is located in CCSR Room 0133-North Wing, between the Transgenic Mouse Facility, and the Stanford Genomics Facility.

  • Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical and research interests focus on the development of new radiation techniques involving stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors of the brain and spine, as well as functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia.

  • Hong Song, MD, PhD

    Hong Song, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Nuclear Medicine)

    BioHong Song received his MD from Tulane University School of Medicine and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Tulane University. He performed research in targeted radionuclide therapy as a postdoctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins University. Following medical school, he joined Dual pathway Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology residency at Stanford. His current research interests include PSMA PET in biochemically recurrent prostate cancer and DOTATATE PET in PRRT for neuroendocrine tumors.

  • Geoffrey Sonn

    Geoffrey Sonn

    Associate Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Body MRI)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interest is in improving prostate cancer diagnosis through MRI and image-targeted prostate biopsy. In collaboration with radiologists at Stanford, we are working to define the optimal role of MRI in prostate cancer. We hope to improve cancer imaging to the point that some men with elevated PSA may safely avoid prostate biopsy. For those who need biopsy, we are evaluating novel MRI-US fusion targeted biopsy, a technique that greatly improves upon the conventional biopsy method.