School of Medicine


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  • Carla Abdelnour

    Carla Abdelnour

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    BioOriginally from Caracas, Venezuela, Dr. Carla Abdelnour received her medical degree at the Central University of Venezuela, and then completed her neurology residency training at the University Hospital Príncipe de Asturias in Madrid, Spain. She conducted her doctorate in Medicine at the Autonomous University of Barcelona working with Drs. Dag Aarsland, Javier Pagonabarraga and Jaime Kulisevsky. Her thesis focused on the influence of Alzheimer´s disease copathology in atrophy patterns, longitudinal cognitive decline, and heterogeneity of patients with dementia with Lewy bodies.
    Carla´s main interest is the study of neurodegenerative diseases, especially Lewy body disease. As a Sue Berghoff LBD Research Fellow, her plan is to investigate the impact of different comorbidities in the clinical presentation, cognitive profile, and disease progression of Lewy body disease. Additionally, she wants to study the biological underpinnings of prodromal Lewy body disease to identify potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis.

  • Kevin Abraham

    Kevin Abraham

    Graduate, Medicine, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioElite masters student in Human Biology at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. Currently a VSR at Tony Wyss-Coray and Carolyn Bertozzi Labs under Michael Schoof
    Email me at: kevabraham@stanford.edu
    or: kevin.abraham@campus.lmu.de
    [linkedin.com/in/sirt1](https://www.linkedin.com/in/sirt1)
    CV: https://theponderingwanderer.notion.site/theponderingwanderer/Kevin-Abraham-76dbde3ebc5940308b2baa66cfa1fe71

  • Bruce T. Adornato

    Bruce T. Adornato

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Adornato joined the Department of Neurology as Voluntary Clinical Faculty in 1978, (subsequently Adjunct Clinical Faculty) and has served as Director of the Neuromuscular Laboratory from 1978 until 1983, performing and interpreting nerve and muscle biopsies as well as serving as attending physician directing residents and medical students in the diagnosis and care of his private patients admitted to Stanford Hospital. Since 1986, he has been attending physician at the Palo Alto VA Hospital, directing Stanford Neurology residents and medical students in the care of veterans. He has published 69 peer reviewed papers and a number of book chapters in the field of neurology. He is currently the medical officer of a silicon valley startup exploring mobility devices for the neurologically impaired.

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group’'s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of advanced imaging techniques to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Meredith Barad, MD

    Meredith Barad, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests involve novel treatment paradigms for challenging pain problems such as orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia and low pressure headaches. I am also interested in migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias and their intersection with chronic pain.

  • Richard Baron, MD

    Richard Baron, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Baron is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist in the Stanford Health Care Headache Clinic and the Vestibular Balance Disorders Program. He is also clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences and, by courtesy, in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received fellowship training in both headache medicine and otoneurology (dizziness and vestibular disorders) at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He specializes in diagnosing, managing, and treating the many causes of headache, facial pain, and dizziness. To provide the highest level of care, he takes a detailed history, performs a specialized physical exam, and collaborates with colleagues across the Stanford Health Care system. Dr. Baron develops a comprehensive care plan customized for each patient. He specializes in non-medication options, nerve blocks and other advanced treatments, Botox® injections, and the latest headache medications and devices.

    Dr. Baron has a particular interest in the management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), which results from pressure around the brain and causes headaches and problems with vision. He has established a multidisciplinary group of Stanford Health Care doctors to improve and coordinate care for people with IIH. The group includes doctors from several departments, including neuro-ophthalmology, neurosurgery, interventional radiology, and bariatric surgery and medical weight loss. They work together to determine the most effective medical and procedural treatments.

    Dr. Baron also has a strong interest in the evaluation of acute vestibular syndromes and the management of dizziness in the emergency room. He has published in Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, and Translational Behavioral Medicine. He has also written several chapters for the Stanford Neurology Resident Handbook. He has presented his research at conferences throughout the United States, and he is heavily involved with quality improvement projects and educating resident physicians.

    Dr. Baron is a member of the American Headache Society, American Academy of Neurology, Catholic Medical Association, and Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic and clinical research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how they affect short-term brain injury and long term outcomes like dementia and depression.

  • Felix Chang, MD

    Felix Chang, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Felix Chang's clinical practice mainly involves intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring (IONM) and the treatment of neurological disorders with botulinum toxin. He earned his medical degree at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He completed his neurology residency at the Harvard Neurology Program at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He then went on to complete a fellowship in clinical neurophysiology with a focus in intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring at Stanford.

  • Steven Z. Chao

    Steven Z. Chao

    Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Neurology

    BioDr. Steven Chao graduated from UCLA in biochemistry with highest honors, Summa Cum Laude. He then finished his combined MD/PhD training program from Chicago Medical School/Rosalind Franklin University with AOA Honors. Following his neurology residency at Stanford, he continued with a behavior neurology fellowship training at UCSF Memory and Aging Center, where he started research in dementia.

    Currently, He serves as a staff neurologist at the Palo Alto VA and with an appointment at the Stanford Department of Neurology as a clinical professor (affiliated). His current research interest is in early imaging diagnosis of dementia and early treatment/prevention of Alzheimer’s disease, cognitive treatment in traumatic brain injury, and alternative treatments for headache.

    Community and academic education about dementia and cognitive health has always been his passion, and he continues to publish research articles and book chapters to support clinical education.

  • S. Charles Cho, MD

    S. Charles Cho, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research focused on peripheral nerve and muscle disorders. Also involved with prevention of cerebrovascular disesase in the intraoperative setting. Ongoing clincial studies include treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Inflammatory Demyelinating Neuropathy and HIV neuropathic pain.

  • Karly Cody

    Karly Cody

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    BioKarly Cody completed her PhD in Neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin in the lab of Dr. Sterling Johnson. Her doctoral research focused on characterizing the preclinical disease stage of Alzheimer's disease using health, biomarker, and cognitive profiles obtained in late-midlife. At Stanford, Karly's research combines neuroimaging and fluid biomarkers to study trajectories of aging, including healthy brain aging as well as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

  • Gwen Coffey

    Gwen Coffey

    Affiliate, Neurology

    BioGwendolyn Coffey, NP is a Nurse Practitioner in Neuro-oncology department at Stanford Health Care.

  • Robert P. Cowan, MD, FAAN, FAHS

    Robert P. Cowan, MD, FAAN, FAHS

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest focus on patient education technology and patient/physician communication with a particular emphasis on tools which increase encounter efficiency and improve outcomes. Basic research focuses on mechanisms of action in Chronic Daily Headache, with a particular emphasis on New Daily Persistent Headache. Techniques include fMRI, biomarker investigation and evoked potentials. Clinical research includes clinical trials of novel treatments for episodic and chronic headache forms.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology), of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology
    On Partial Leave from 03/15/2024 To 06/15/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Gayle Deutsch, PhD, ABPP

    Gayle Deutsch, PhD, ABPP

    Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Neurology

    Current Role at StanfordClinical Professor (Affiliated) Stanford Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences

  • Les Dorfman, MD

    Les Dorfman, MD

    Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical electrophysiology of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including nerve conduction velocity; electromyography (EMG); and visual, auditory and somatosensory evoked potentials. Multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and treatment. Neurological education.

  • Lauren Drag, PhD

    Lauren Drag, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated), Neurology

    BioLauren Drag, PhD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor(Affiliated) in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her bachelor’s degree from Pomona College and a PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Arizona. Dr. Drag is board certified in Clinical Neuropsychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology.

    She completed a clinical internship in neuropsychology at the VA Ann Arbor Medical Center and a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in neuropsychology at the University of Michigan Healthcare System. Prior to coming to Stanford, she was a researcher at the VA Palo Alto Medical Center and served as Director of the Neuropsychology Area of Emphasis at Palo Alto University. Dr. Drag’s research interests are in cognitive aging and traumatic brain injury.

  • Rachelle Dugue, MD, PhD

    Rachelle Dugue, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Dugue is a board-certified neurologist within the Neurohospitalist Division. She cares for patients at both Stanford Health Care and Stanford Health Care Tri-Valley. She received her MD and PhD at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, where she completed a thesis studying novel treatments for traumatic brain injury. Dr. Dugue then completed her neurology residency at Columbia University Medical Center-New York Presbyterian, followed by a vascular neurology fellowship at Stanford University Hospital.

    Dr. Dugue provides comprehensive, individualized care for patients with a wide range of neurological conditions. She has been recognized for her dedication to excellence in patient care, medical education, and student mentorship.

    Her research interests are centered on health equity in neurology care and clinical trials, stroke, and neuroinfectious disease. Dr. Dugue has published in multiple peer-reviewed journals, including The Neurohospitalist, Practical Neurology, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, and Neurology.

  • Shefali Dujari, MD

    Shefali Dujari, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Dujari is a board-certified neurologist and fellowship-trained neurohospitalist, specializing in the care of acute neurologic disorders. She practices at both Stanford Hospital and Stanford ValleyCare. She completed her medical training at Boston University, internal medicine preliminary year at California Pacific Medical Center, neurology residency at Stanford University, and neurohospitalist fellowship at Stanford University. She serves as the Neurology Resident & Fellow Wellness & Mentoring Committee faculty lead, the associated program director of the Stanford Neurohospitalist Fellowship, and the physician lead of the ValleyCare Neuroscience Quality Committee. She has a special interest in medical education and quality improvement.

    For more information on the Stanford Neurohospitalist Program & Fellowship, please visit: https://med.stanford.edu/neurology/divisions/neurohospitalist.html

  • Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Jeffrey Dunn, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in the human application of emerging immunotherapies for neurological disease, focusing on Multiple Sclerosis, CIS, transverse myelitis and Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO). Collaborative research with Stanford and extramural scientific faculty to identify biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in humans. Clinical trials to assess efficacy of emerging treatments for MS, CIS and NMO.

  • Tina Duong MPT, PhD

    Tina Duong MPT, PhD

    Sr Res Scientist-Basic Life, Neurology

    BioI am a research physical therapist with over 19 years of experience as a practicing clinician and most of it in neuromuscular clinical research. My doctoral studies focused on effects of contracture development on downstream musculoskeletal and biomechanical changes associated with changes in function.I hope to continue work in novel outcomes development with other neuromuscular diseases as well as pursue work on the benefits of rehabilitation and exercise as conjunctive therapies in neuromuscular disease.

    Character is the driving force in my work and collaborations. The most important qualities I find in people are integrity, work ethic, humility, empathy, leadership, initiative and drive...I live by Ralph Waldo Emerson's Success poem..."to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded." I find it difficult at times to summarize ones own accomplishments or impact. So I would like to share a recommendation that was written about me in which I hope to refer back as my north star in both my personal and professional life.

    "Dr Tina Duong is a world renown physiotherapist, master trainer, clinical investigator, scientific academician and most importantly an INCREDIBLE person. I had the privilege of working with her side by side during the development of a new therapy for spinal muscular atrophy. Her determination to help the scientific community, patients and carers is truly inspiring. Her knowledge and skills place her at the vanguard of clinical translation of data and meaningful patient outcomes. Her capabilities span everything from publications, meeting moderation, speaker events and clinical training. She has instinctive clinical intuition which allows her to support drug development and translation in both early stage and also during pivotal trial design, data interpretation and patient care and management. Her ethical and moral considerations of medicine and science means she is 100% focused on each individual to support them as best as possible and this is obvious from everyone who has worked or knows her. Her passion, energy and knowledge inspires people, teams and countries! Wherever Tina goes and whatever she embarks on now or in the future, the value she brings is like no one else and her impact is immediate. I personally look forward to the next opportunity to work with Tina as a brilliant scholar. She lives the ambition of: “The world is changed by your example, not by your opinion”

  • Emmanuel During, MD

    Emmanuel During, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving diagnostics and therapeutics in RBD, using home ambulatory devices including wearable actigraphy, dry-EEG, to power clinical trials based on objective outcomes of RBD activity.

    Controlling symptoms of RBD testing drugs rigorously.

    Predicting the course of neurodegeneration using deep phenotyping using clinical and serum biomarkers, measures of autonomic impairment, skin biopsy, microbiome

  • Rouzbeh Fateh, MD

    Rouzbeh Fateh, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Fateh is a fellowship-trained neurologist, specializing in neuromuscular disorders. He is an assistant professor with the Stanford School of Medicine Department of Neurology. His background includes extensive work in neurology, mental health, and neurodevelopmental disabilities.

    His practice focuses on providing comprehensive care for complex neurological and neuromuscular diseases. His expertise includes neuropathies, myopathies, and other brain and nerve-related disorders. He is board-certified in neurology, clinical neurophysiology, and electrodiagnostic medicine.

    Dr. Fateh was involved in research related to neurodevelopmental disabilities and multiple sclerosis. His work has been published in international journals such as Swiss Medical Weekly and The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry.

    He has also given numerous presentations in different meetings including annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Additional languages spoken: Farsi, Turkish (Azeri dialect)

  • Margaret S. Ferris, MD

    Margaret S. Ferris, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Ferris is a fellowship-trained neurologist and Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology, Division of Movement Disorders.

    She diagnoses and treats a breath of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor. She recognizes the broad effects of these conditions on daily living and aims to develop personalized, comprehensive treatment plans that optimize health and quality of life.

    Dr. Ferris research interests focus on access to interventional therapies for movement disorders. She has participated in investigations sponsored by the National Institutes of to evaluate advanced treatments for complications of Parkinson’s disease.

    She has co-authored articles in publications such as Nature, The Neurohospitalist, and BioMed Central (BMC) Genomics. She has presented her insights about innovations in the understanding, detection, and management of movement disorders at conferences including, the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, Pan American Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Congress.

    She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the Movement Disorder Society.

  • Anna Finley Caulfield, MD

    Anna Finley Caulfield, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Finley joined the Stanford Stroke Center in 2004 from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. She cares for acute stroke patients and other neurologically critical ill patients in the intensive care unit. Currently, her research interests include hypothermia after cardiac arrest and comparing health care provider's predications of future neurological function in neurologically critical ill patients to their 6-month outcome.

  • Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    The Maslah Saul, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fisher is interested in clincal, laboratory and translational aspects of epilepsy research. Prior work has included: electrical deep brain stimulation for epilepsy, studied in laboratory models and clinical trials; drug delivery to a seizure focus; mechanisms of absence epilepsy studied with in vitro slices of brain thalamus; hyperthermic seizures; diagnosis and treatment of non-epileptic seizures, the post-ictal state; driving and epilepsy; new antiepileptic drugs; surgery for epilepsy.

  • Andrea Fuentes

    Andrea Fuentes

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Fuentes is a board-certified neurologist with the Movement Disorders Center at Stanford Health Care. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences. Dr. Fuentes completed a movement disorders fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

    She provides comprehensive care for patients with different types of movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian disorders, essential tremor, ataxia, dystonia, and chorea. As part of her clinical practice, she performs deep brain stimulation (DBS) evaluation and programming and botulinum toxin injections.

    Her research efforts include several clinical trials assessing treatments for movement disorders. She has been a sub-investigator on multiple trials evaluating drug candidates for the treatment of PD and ataxia. She has presented her work at national and international meetings, including those for the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society and the American College of Physicians.

    Dr. Fuentes is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  • Kristin Galetta, MD

    Kristin Galetta, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Galetta is a board-certified neurologist within the Neurohospitalist and Neuroimmunology divisions. She completed a multiple sclerosis (MS) fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

    She has extensive experience diagnosing and treating patients with autoimmune neurologic conditions including multiple sclerosis, optic neuritis, autoimmune encephalitis and transverse myelitis. Her research interests are focused on understanding best treatment strategies for patients with multiple sclerosis and more rare autoimmune neurologic conditions. She also has an interest in medical education improvement.

    She has published in numerous peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Neurological Sciences and Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders. She is a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including Neurology and Frontiers in Neurology.

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.

  • Natasha Abadilla

    Natasha Abadilla

    Affiliate, Department Funds
    Resident in Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsglobal health, public health, health disparities, advocacy, pediatric neurology

  • Carl Gold

    Carl Gold

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Gold is a board-certified neurologist who is fellowship-trained in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders in hospitalized patients. He cares for a broad range of patients, including individuals with seizures, central nervous system infections, autoimmune diseases, headaches, neuromuscular conditions, and neurological complications of cancer. Dr. Gold's primary research interest focuses on enhancing the communication skills of neurology residents, and he serves as the Director of the Stanford Neurology Residency Communication Coaching Program. He is also the Fellowship Director of the Stanford Neurohospitalist Fellowship.

    Dr. Gold serves as Vice Chair of Quality, Safety, & Experience for the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences. In this role, he coordinates projects aimed at improving care for patients with neurological conditions across the health system.

    For more information on the Stanford Neurohospitalist Program & Fellowship, please visit: https://med.stanford.edu/neurology/divisions/neurohospitalist.html

    Learn more about the Stanford Neurology Communication Coaching Program by visiting: http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/education/resident-coaching.html

    Additional information on Stanford Neurology's efforts in Quality, Safety, & Value can be found here: http://med.stanford.edu/neurology/quality.html

  • Olga Fedin Goldberg

    Olga Fedin Goldberg

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Goldberg is board-certified in Neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She provides comprehensive neurologic care to patients with a broad range of neurologic conditions, including those who have multiple neurologic conditions. She is interested in medical education for neurology residents and for referring primary care providers and serves as Director of Neurology Resident Continuity Clinic. Additionally, she completed the Stanford CELT (Clinical Education Leadership Training) Program for developing skills in quality improvement. She has led or played a key role in multiple quality improvement projects in the Department of Neurology, including those focused on increasing patient understanding of their neurologic medications upon hospital discharge, improvement of outcomes for headache patients seen in primary care, and in optimizing clinic processes involved in collection of cerebrospinal fluid.

  • Neelam Goyal, MD

    Neelam Goyal, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Goyal's research interests involve monitoring and managing the short and long-term toxicity of immunosuppressive agents used in the treatment of immune-mediated neuromuscular disorders. She is actively involved in a grant-supported project investigating steroid toxicity in patients with myasthenia gravis.

    She also serves as the Wellbeing Co-Director for the Neurology Department, working on a grant-supported project aimed at mitigating the adverse impact of work on personal relationships.

  • Maxwell Greene, MD

    Maxwell Greene, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Greene is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist. He is also a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Greene provides clinical care for adult patients with disorders of the muscles and peripheral nerves that cause weakness and numbness. He specializes in diagnosing and treating neuromuscular diseases that include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), all types of muscular dystrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), myasthenia gravis, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). For CIDP and CMT, Stanford is one of the few centers of excellence in the country.

    A significant part of Dr. Greene’s practice involves investigational work, where he seeks to determine the cause of a patient’s symptoms. In addition to performing the full range of diagnostic tests including interpreting biopsy procedures, he has special qualifications in electrodiagnosis and the use of electromyography and nerve conduction studies.

    Treatments offered by Dr. Greene cover the complete spectrum of options, with an emphasis on immune therapies for certain conditions. For CIDP and myasthenia gravis, he administers immune globulin, steroids, plasmapheresis, and rituximab. To help manage symptoms of CMT and support areas of the body weakened by this disease, he can recommend physical therapy, occupational therapy, and foot, ankle, and knee orthotics.

    For the treatment of ALS and muscular dystrophy, Dr. Greene leads a multidisciplinary team offering physical and occupational therapy, pulmonary expertise, speech and swallow expertise, nutrition counseling, social services, and specialized nursing, and works together with genetic counseling. All team members collaborate closely to ensure patients receive the care and comfort needed to meet their emotional as well as physical needs.

    As part of his commitment to advancing patients’ treatment options, Dr. Greene conducts clinical research. Among his current interests are
    innovative new therapies for ALS and other nerve and muscular disorders. This is an exciting time in the field of neuromuscular medicine, with real potential for treatment breakthroughs for the first time in decades. Exploring these new directions enables Dr. Greene to offer Stanford patients access to options that may not be available anywhere else.

    To highlight new advances for his peers, Dr. Greene has made national and regional presentations at conferences including the American Academy of Neurology meeting. Topics include the results of a study supported in part by the National Institutes of Health: paraneoplastic antibodies as markers of Hodgkin’s disease. JAMA Neurology published Dr. Greene’s article on this research.

    Dr. Greene’s achievements have earned recognition from the American Academy of Neurology and other organizations. He is also the recipient of a travel award from the American Neurological Association and a grant from the NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

    A member of the American Academy of Neurology, Dr. Greene is also an active member of the Western ALS Consortium and Northeastern ALS Consortium.

  • Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Iqbal Farrukh and Asad Jamal Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Administrative and Academic Special Programs)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs the Medical Director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders and Principal Investigator of the Stanford Extreme Phenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease (StEP AD) Cohort, Dr. Greicius' research focuses on elucidating the neurobiologic underpinnings of AD. His lab combines cutting edge brain imaging, "deep" phenotyping, and whole-genome sequencing of human subjects to identify novel pathways involved in AD pathogenesis. The goal of his work is to develop effective treatment for AD patients.

  • Jiaqi Gu

    Jiaqi Gu

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    BioI am a postdoctoral scholar in Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Stanford University and under supervision of Dr. Zihuai He. Before that, I obtained my PhD degree in statistics under supervision of Prof. Philip L.H. Yu and Prof. Guosheng Yin in University of Hong Kong and my bachelor degrees in statistics from Renmin University of China.

    My researches concentrate on preference learning, network data modeling, quantitative analysis of survival and public health data, high-dimensional statistical inference with geometric information and statistical genetics.

  • Jin S. Hahn, MD

    Jin S. Hahn, MD

    Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Clinical informatics and electronic health records
    2. Neonatal and fetal neurology
    3. Prenatal diagnosis neurodevelopmental anomalies
    4. Personalized Health and Wellness Records

  • May Han, MD

    May Han, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMultiple sclerosis
    Neuromyelitis optica
    Autoimmune CNS disorders

  • Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Karen G. Hirsch cares for critically ill patients with neurologic disorders in the intensive care unit. Dr. Hirsch's research focuses on using continuous and discrete multi-modal data to develop phenotypes and identify signatures of treatment responsiveness in patients with coma after cardiac arrest. She is the Co-PI of PRECICECAP (PRecision Care In Cardiac ArrEst - ICECAP, NINDS R01 NS119825-01) and works closely with collaborators in data science at Stanford and with industry partners to apply machine learning analyses to the complex multi-modal ICU data. Dr. Hirsch also studies neuro-imaging in post-cardiac arrest coma and traumatic brain injury.

    Additional research interests include a broad array of topics and Dr. Hirsch greatly appreciates the importance of team science and collaboration. Along with colleagues in Biomedical Ethics, Dr. Hirsch studies brain death and organ donation with a focus on ethical challenges and prediction models. Along with colleagues in Cardiac Anesthesia and Cardiothoracic Surgery, Dr. Hirsch studies neurologic outcomes in patients on mechanical circulatory support including ECMO.

    Dr. Hirsch is broadly interested in improving neurologic outcomes after acute brain injury and identifying early phenotypes to guide precision medicine in neurocritical care, especially in patients with post-cardiac arrest brain injury.

  • John Hotson

    John Hotson

    Professor (Clinical) of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe response and recovery of human visual cortex, oculomotor systems and related cognitive functions after acquired neurological disorders is a main area of interest.

  • Ting-Ting Huang

    Ting-Ting Huang

    Associate Professor (Research) of Neurology (Adult Neurology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the role of oxygen free radicals in oxidative tissue damage and degeneration. Our research tools include transgenic and knockout mice and tissue culture cells for in vitro gene expression.

  • Sung Soo Jang

    Sung Soo Jang

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    BioDr.Jang is a neuroscientist who has a strong passion and interest in investigating the mechanisms that underlie neurodevelopmental disorders such as Epilepsy and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). He is a scientist who does not dreams of building successful career through science, but would like to become a pure brain researcher who loves scientific discovery itself and help patients suffering from Neurological disorders through academic observations.

  • Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interests include autonomic disorders, small fiber neuropathies and the development of effective methods of testing and treating these disorders. Prior work has focused on small fiber painful and autonomic neuropathies; syndromes of orthostatic intolerance and syncope; gastrointestinal motility dysfunction; cyclic vomiting; protacted Gastroesophageal Reflux; non-allergic rhinitis syndromes; and the relationship between the autonomic nervous system and normal or abnormal sleep. Additional areas of interest include the neurology of phonation and swallowing disorders, and peripheral nerve injury and repair.

  • Jocelyn Jiao, MD

    Jocelyn Jiao, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Jiao is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist with the Movement Disorders Center at Stanford Health Care. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.

    Dr. Jiao has extensive experience providing comprehensive care for patients with different types of movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease. She is fellowship-trained in both movement disorders and hospice and palliative medicine. Dr. Jiao is developing an interdisciplinary neuropalliative clinic that emphasizes planning for the future and maximizes quality of life for people living with chronic neurological illness.

    Dr. Jiao’s research efforts include a pilot study assessing the impact of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s-related motor symptoms upon mood and pain. Specifically, this work focuses on identifying correlations between DBS targets and reductions in medications that address depression, anxiety, and impulsivity symptoms that result from Parkinson’s treatments. Dr. Jiao has also completed a pilot study focused upon narrative medicine interventions for people living with Parkinson’s disease.

    Dr. Jiao has published her work in multiple peer-reviewed journals, including Pain Medicine and the Journal of Neurosurgery. Dr. Jiao is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society , and the International Neuropalliative Care Society.

  • Tahereh Kamali

    Tahereh Kamali

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAI for Healthcare, Neuroimaging, Biomarkers Development