Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 1-87 of 87 Results

  • Christine Alfano

    Christine Alfano

    Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Digital Rhetoric, Rhetoric of Gaming, Visual Rhetoric, Gender and Technology, Writing Program Administration

  • Doree Allen

    Doree Allen

    Senior Lecturer in Oral Communication at the Center for Teaching and Learning

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPoetics of the performed text, voice and gender, leadership communication, speaking in museum settings, pedagogy of aesthetic development, Readers' Theatre, healing and the arts, the rhetoric of stage presence

  • Mutallip Anwar

    Mutallip Anwar

    Lecturer

    BioMutallip Anwar completed his PhD in Language & Rhetoric at the University of Washington. Prior to joining PWR, he taught college writing courses at the University of Washington and Highline College. His primary teaching and research interests include rhetoric and composition studies, language education, discourse analysis, and translation.

  • Angela Becerra Vidergar

    Angela Becerra Vidergar

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Radio and Multimedia Storytelling; Humanities Communication; 20th-21st c. Literature and Culture of the Americas; Disaster Fiction and Survivalism; Imaginations of the Future; Graphic Narratives; Theorizations of the Collective Imaginary; 19th and 20th-century Philosophy; Speculative Fiction and the Impact of Science and Technology on Society

  • Kim Beil

    Kim Beil

    ITALIC Associate Director

    BioKim Beil is an art historian who specializes in the history of photography. Her book, Good Pictures: A History of Popular Photography, looks at 50 stylistic trends in the medium since the 19th century. Recently she’s written about photography and climate change for The Atlantic, a survey of street views for Cabinet, and a history of screenshots for the Believer. She also writes frequently about modern and contemporary art for Artforum, Art in America, BOMB, Photograph, and Sculpture magazines.

  • Shaleen Brawn

    Shaleen Brawn

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Rhetoric of Science and Technology, Science Communication, Publishing as Process and Institution

  • Tessa Rose Brown

    Tessa Rose Brown

    Lecturer

    BioDr. Tessa Brown, a Lecturer in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric, is a writer, researcher, and educator. Her doctoral dissertation, “SCHOOLED: Hiphop Composition at the Predominantly White University,” considered the contradictions of hiphop culture, writing education, and the fight for language rights in predominantly or historically white institutional contexts. Dr. Brown also researches social media and whiteness and femininity, and uses memoristic and autoethnographic methods in her work.

    Tessa’s essays, reviews, and fiction have appeared in Harper’s, Hyperallergic, The Forward, The New Haven Review, The American Reader, and rhetoric journal Kairos. Her peer-reviewed research is forthcoming in Peitho. Her novella Sorry for Partying was honored by the Paris Literary Prize in 2014. She has written a blog, Hiphopocracy, since 2011, and lives in San Francisco.

  • Nissa Ren Cannon

    Nissa Ren Cannon

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on transatlantic modernism, citizenship, and print culture. My book project, which was chosen for the 2019 Penn State First Book Institute, argues that the bureaucratic and literary documents of interwar itinerancy–including passports, travel ephemera, and newspapers–shape expatriation as a distinct mode of national belonging.

  • Tara Diener

    Tara Diener

    Lecturer

    BioTara received a Ph.D. in Anthropology and History from the University of Michigan in 2016 and a Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology, and Society in 2014. Prior to graduate studies at Michigan, she practiced as a Registered Nurse in obstetrics and pediatrics while earning an M.A. in Bioethics, Humanities, and Society from the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences (CEHLS) at Michigan State University. She has taught courses in creative non-fiction writing, medical, biological, and sociocultural anthropology, international and African studies, global health, political science, and the history of medicine in the US, Western Europe, and sub-Saharan Africa. She is an anthropologist and historian of medicine, maternal and infant health and mortality, global health (non)systems, and nursing ethics and practice. She is proficient in both archival and ethnographic methods and her previous projects have focused on the United Kingdom and Sierra Leone.

  • Kevin DiPirro

    Kevin DiPirro

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Rhetoric of Performance; Multimodal Presentation; Devised Theatre; Art and Technology

  • Chloe Summers Edmondson

    Chloe Summers Edmondson

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioChloe Summers Edmondson is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (previously Thinking Matters). She received her PhD from Stanford in the French & Italian Department in 2020. Her research is situated at the crossroads of literary criticism, cultural history, and media studies. She specializes in 17th and 18th-century France, with a particular focus on letter-writing practices. She has also worked extensively in the field of Digital Humanities. Chloe was co-project lead on the "Salons Project" with Melanie Conroy, a project under the umbrella of "Mapping the Republic of Letters." She completed the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities offered through CESTA, the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Her work has appeared in The Journal of Modern History, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and in the series Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment. Most recently she co-edited a volume with Dan Edelstein, entitled Networks of Enlightenment: Digital Approaches to the Republic of Letters, with Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment. She holds a BA with Honors in French and a MA in Communication, also from Stanford.

    Courses taught include: "Stories Everywhere," "Design that Understands Us," and "Reading the Body."

  • Jeremy Edwards

    Jeremy Edwards

    Lecturer

    BioDr. Jeremy Edwards is a Lecturer for the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford University. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in Education from UC Santa Barbara, with an emphasis in Human Development and Cultural Studies, and his B.A. in Psychology at UCLA.

    Dr. Edwards’ research centers on the Black experience in areas of higher education. Through a critical race lens, his work generally examines higher education practices and policies that impact Black student experiences. His research continues to explore different levels of access and opportunity landscapes that often exclude or ignore the histories and experiences of Black-identifying people. In his dissertation, “A Critical Race Analysis: Examining the Black College Experience at a Selective Public Minority-Serving Research Institution (MSRI),” he utilized qualitative case studies to assess relationships and support systems between Black students and highly selective four-year universities that ultimately influenced their agency and decision-making toward future career pathways. Dr. Edwards currently teaches PWR1JE: Exploring Voices: Race, Language, and Society. His recent article, “Black Pathways: Examining the History of Race Considerations in College Admissions at Highly Selective Campuses,” was published in the Journal for Critical Thought and Praxis.

  • Erik Ellis

    Erik Ellis

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Multimodal Composition, Visual Rhetoric, The Essay, Style, Picture Books

  • Norah Fahim

    Norah Fahim

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Digital Rhetoric, Narrative Inquiry, Writing Program Administration, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, and Second Language Writing

  • Lindsey Felt

    Lindsey Felt

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: 20th and 21st Century American Literature, Disability Studies, Media Culture, Science and Technology Studies, Graphic Narrative, Digital Humanities, Posthumanism.

  • Megan Formato

    Megan Formato

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: History of Science and Technology; Rhetoric of Science; Literature and Science; Science and Technology Studies; Scientific Writing Practices; Women and Science; Revision Practices

  • Thomas Freeland

    Thomas Freeland

    Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Theatre (Shakespeare, German Theatre, Shakespeare in German); Critical Theory, Literature in Translation, German Literature, History of the American West, European History, Political Science

  • Mark Gardiner

    Mark Gardiner

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Social and Cultural Anthropology, African Studies, Environmental Justice, Race, Critical Science and Technology Studies, Politics, Institutions, International Development

  • Alexander Greenhough

    Alexander Greenhough

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSpecialization: Film Theory; Film History; Postwar European and American Cinema; Contemporary New Zealand Cinema

  • Nate Grubman

    Nate Grubman

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    BioNate Grubman is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE). He was previously a postdoctoral scholar at the Freeman-Spogli Institute's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Prior to coming to Stanford, he earned a BA in International Relations at Tufts University, an MS in Applied Economics at Johns Hopkins University, and a PhD in Political Science at Yale University, At Yale, he taught courses in comparative politics and international relations. In New Haven, he also co-designed and co-taught a community college macroeconomics course re-centered around the Middle East and North Africa.

    Nate is currently working on a book entitled Skipping Class: Tunisia's Party System After the Revolution. The book uses archival material, elite interviews, an original survey, and analysis of campaign materials to understand why the party system formed after Tunisia's 2010--11 uprising failed to offer appealing economic policy choices to voters. More broadly, the book considers the role of political parties and their policy promises during transitions from authoritarian rule. His other research focuses on corruption and political nostalgia.

    Nate first went to North Africa in 2007, when he studied abroad in Cairo and briefly lived on a boat. After graduating from college, he spent two years teaching middle school English and high school history in Cairo. He was surprised and inspired by the popular uprising that took place in Egypt in 2011 and has dedicated the time ever since to studying the many difficulties experienced during political transitions. In addition to his time in Egypt, he has studied in Morocco and conducted extensive research in Tunisia.

  • Shannon Hervey

    Shannon Hervey

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Cold War Literature and Culture, Popular American Literature and Culture, Young Adult Literature, Posthumanism, the Digital Humanities, Writing Pedagogy, and Multimodal Composition

  • Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    SLE Lecturer

    BioNura Hossainzadeh is a Lecturer in the Structured Liberal Education program and a political theorist by training. Her interest in political theory began when she was an undergraduate at Harvard, where she studied the canon of political theory—which begins in ancient Greece and ends in contemporary Europe and the U.S. After college, Nura moved to Qom, Iran, enrolling in an all-female Islamic seminary, Jami’at Al-Zahra, and taking courses in Islamic political thought and the Iranian revolution. She continued her study of both Western and Islamic political thought at UC Berkeley’s Department of Political Science, where she earned her Ph.D. in political science in 2016, writing her dissertation on a figure who not only wrote political theory but led an Islamic government—Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

    Nura’s current book project is entitled Islamic Republican: Ruhollah Khomeini’s Political Thought. Khomeini's thought became a primary resource for the writing of Iran’s Islamic constitution and continues to influence politics in contemporary Iran. Nura’s book examines all of Khomeini’s political works in the original Persian: his yet-untranslated book, published in 1943, The Unveiling of Secrets; his more widely read 1970 seminary lectures (later compiled into a book form), Islamic Government; and his post-revolutionary statements, speeches, and correspondence, contained in 11 volumes. The book concludes by investigating how contemporary Islamic thinkers engage Khomeini’s legacy and deploy it to justify or criticize democratic elements in Islamic governance.

    While pursuing research on Khomeini, Nura has taught a variety of courses on topics as diverse as American politics and government, feminist thought, canonical and non-Western political theory, Iranian and Middle East politics, and legal theory.

  • Brittany S. Hull

    Brittany S. Hull

    Lecturer

    BioBorn and raised in Chester, PA.
    Proud graduate of THE 1ST HBCU, Lincoln University.
    A firm believer that ALL lives can't matter until ALL BLACK lives do.
    I drink my water and mind my business.

  • Michaela Hulstyn

    Michaela Hulstyn

    SLE Lecturer

    BioMichaela Hulstyn is a Lecturer in Structured Liberal Education (SLE), a first-year residential education program at Stanford University.

    Her first monograph, _Unselfing: Global French Literature at the Limits of Consciousness_, is forthcoming with the University of Toronto Press in 2022. Her research interests center on 20th- and 21st-century French and Francophone literature, phenomenology of the self and intersubjectivity, cognitive approaches to transcultural literature, and literature as ethical philosophy. Her work has appeared in MLN, Philosophy and Literature, and Contemporary French and Francophone Studies, among other places.

    She previously held academic appointments at Florida State University and Reed College.

  • Dharshani Lakmali Jayasinghe

    Dharshani Lakmali Jayasinghe

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioDharshani Lakmali Jayasinghe is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education at Stanford University. Lakmali has a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Stanford University and has been teaching and mentoring both college and high school students since 2004. In 2016, Lakmali was awarded the Stanford-City College of New York Teaching Fellowship, while in 2020, she was selected as a Provost’s Teaching Fellow. Lakmali has taught a variety of courses in the liberal arts and the humanities intersecting literature, film, comparative literature, philosophy, literary theory, linguistics, history, global health, medicine, human biology, law, ethics, and human rights. She has also facilitated ten quarter-long workshops for the Stanford Humanities House.

    Lakmali is an Assistant Editor of the Stanford Global Shakespeare Encyclopaedia (General Editor: Prof. Patricia Parker; Associate Editor: Prof. Roland Greene), and a Senior Editor of the Stanford International Policy Review (Chair of Faculty Advisory Board: Prof. Francis Fukuyama). She is also a Research Associate at the Poetic Media Lab; a digital humanities lab at Stanford’s Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis (CESTA). During the 2021-2022 academic year, Lakmali is affiliated with the Humanities Center at the University of Rochester, New York as an Associate of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar on “Unbordering Migration in the Americas: Causes, Experiences, Identities”. In 2016/17, she was a Visiting Ph.D. Scholar at the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University, New York.

    Lakmali has won over twenty fellowships and awards during the last few years, the most recent being the 2021 Stanford Historical Society’s Susan W. Schofield Oral History Award for Excellence in the Practice of Oral History for her oral history project “In Transit: An Oral History Project on Crossing Borders”. During four consecutive years, she won awards at the Annual Korean Literature Essay Competition (double-blind and peer reviewed) organized by the Korea Translation Institute and the University of California, Berkeley. Lakmali was also the recipient of the Graduate Film Studies Academic Paper Prize awarded by the Interdepartmental Program in Film Studies at University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is the recipient of the Fulbright MA Fellowship, the Endeavor Award (to pursue doctoral studies at the Australian National University), the Andrew W. Mellon Dissertation Writing Fellowship awarded by the Stanford Humanities Center, and several fellowships and grants awarded by the Stanford Center for East Asian Studies, the Stanford School of Humanities and Sciences, the Stanford Europe Center, the Stanford Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, and the Stanford d.school / the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design.

    Lakmali’s research interests include topics in immigration, visa law and policy, border surveillance, human rights, and human dignity. She works across literature, film, oral history, law, and the digital humanities using cross-cultural and interdisciplinary methods. She has presented her research at over twenty academic conferences, including multiple conferences at Harvard University, Columbia University, and Stanford University. She has also presented papers at the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA), the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the Association for Asian Studies (AAS). In 2021, she was a recipient of the NeMLA Conference Paper Prize and was also awarded an Outstanding Conference Abstract Award at the International Graduate Student Conference organized by the East West Center, HI. Lakmali is currently working on a book based on her research on visa law and policy. An article based on this work is forthcoming in the double-blind peer-reviewed journal Law and Literature.

  • Harriett Virginia-Ann Jernigan

    Harriett Virginia-Ann Jernigan

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLearner autonomy, project-based instruction, storytelling, CRT,

  • Jennifer Johnson

    Jennifer Johnson

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Intersections of Language, Identity and Culture, Sociocultural Studies in Education, Second Language Acquisition Theory and Bilingualism, Multimodal Communication and Theories of Embodiment, Deaf Studies

  • Christopher Kamrath

    Christopher Kamrath

    Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Citizenship and Political Dissent, Media History, Cultural Memory, the Role of Cultural Identity and Self-Fashioning in Rhetoric

  • Hayden Kantor

    Hayden Kantor

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFood and agriculture; ethnographic writing; rhetorics of capitalism; ethics of care; culture and history of India and South Asia

  • Valerie Kinsey

    Valerie Kinsey

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Writing and Critical Thinking Instruction; Institutional Rhetorics; Rhetorics of Race and Gender; Creative Writing; Philosophy and Rhetoric; Historiography; American History and Literature

  • Alison Grace Laurence

    Alison Grace Laurence

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioAlison Laurence is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education. She received her PhD from MIT’s interdisciplinary program in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society (HASTS) in 2019. A cultural and environmental historian, she specializes in the study of nature on display. Her current book manuscript--Of Dinosaurs and Culture Wars: Extinction, Extraction, and Modern American Monsters--traces how popular displays transformed dinosaurs and other creatures of deep time from scientific specimens to consumer objects and artifacts of everyday American life. Alison’s work has appeared in the Science Museum Group Journal, the History of Anthropology Newsletter, and the Anthropocene Curriculum. She holds a BA in Classics from Brown University and an MA in History and Public History from the University of New Orleans.

    During the 2021-22 academic year, she is teaching "Stories Everywhere," "Design That Understands Us," "The Meat We Eat," and a new IntroSem called "Animal Archives."

  • Raechel Lee

    Raechel Lee

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: 20 - 21st century Latin American Literatures and Cultures; Creative Writing; Translation; Poetry

  • Roy Lee

    Roy Lee

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    BioI am a Thinking Matters Fellow. This year, I will be teaching Rules of War and Emotion. My research focuses on ancient Greek philosophy, especially Aristotle's ethics. I also have interests in contemporary ethics, political philosophy, and other periods and areas of the history of philosophy.

  • Helen Lie

    Helen Lie

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Communication Pedagogy; Visual Communication; Presentation Skills

  • Kahdeidra Martin

    Kahdeidra Martin

    Lecturer

    BioDr. Kahdeidra Monét Martin, BA '06, received her Ph.D. in Urban Education at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York in June 2021. Her dissertation is entitled, "Counterstories of Black High School Students and Graduates of NYC Independent Schools: A Narrative Case Study," and it won the 2022 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Qualitative Research SIG of the American Education Research Association. Her research foci primarily orbit around adolescent literacy, urban education, decolonial pedagogy, sociolinguistics, and qualitative inquiry. In recognition of her commitment to pedagogical excellence, she was one of three graduate student recipients of the 2020 Teaching Award from The Graduate Center.

    Dr. Martin previously earned a Certificate in Interactive Technology & Pedagogy from the Graduate Center, and she holds a Master of Science in Education degree, Teaching Urban Adolescents with Disabilities, from Long Island University and a Bachelor’s degree in African & African American Studies with a minor in Linguistics from Stanford University. Dr. Martin is experienced in facilitating professional learning sessions in culturally relevant teaching, Black feminist pedagogy, multimodal & game-based learning, and critical conversations on power and privilege. In 2020, she co-authored a book on the latter topic, Classroom Talk for Social Change: Critical Conversations in English Language Arts (Teachers College Press, 2020), which received a 2021 Divergent Book Award for Excellence in 21st Century Literacies Research.

    Currently, Dr. Martin serves as a Lecturer in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric. In addition, she serves as an inaugural Scholar in Residence at The Chapin School, her secondary school alma mater.

  • Mejgan Massoumi

    Mejgan Massoumi

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioMejgan Massoumi received her Ph.D. in June of 2021 from the History Department at Stanford University. Her work and research explores Afghan engagement with a global communication technology, the radio, during a period of intense political reform and social transformations (1960-1979). Drawing on archives in Farsi, Pashto, Tajik, Urdu, and English, and a collection of oral histories from former Radio Afghanistan employees and other producers of music and art, her work offers a fresh perspective on Afghan history by considering the mobile and fluid international networks made possible through the producers and consumers of the radio and music in the twentieth century and the centrality of Afghan people to that story.

    Having earned previous degrees in Architecture (B.A.) and City Planning (M.C.P) from the University of California at Berkeley, the foundation of her scholarship is built upon a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective. Her study of the past is informed through the study of sounds broadcast in and beyond the built environment.

    As a scholar and educator, and refugee and immigrant, Mejgan is committed to advancing a culture of equity and inclusion within academia through her activism and advocacy for diversity as well as her teaching and scholarship focused on the study of history through the experiences of marginalized peoples, places, and cultures.

    Mejgan's previous research explored how the dynamics of different forms of religious fundamentalisms are produced, represented and practiced in the city. The culmination of this research can be found in her co-edited book, The Fundamentalist City? Religiosity and the Remaking of Urban Space (Routledge, 2010). Another project that explored the multiple meanings of diversity, inclusion, and exclusion in fast-changing urban contexts resulted in the co-edited volume Urban Diversity: Space, Culture, and Inclusive Pluralism in Cities Worldwide (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010). Her master's research focused on race and inter-ethnic conflicts in post-9/11 Afghanistan, highlighting how humanitarian aid from the West contributed to deepening social and ethnic divides. She has also contributed articles to the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, the International Journal of Islamic Architecture, and the Journal of International Affairs at Columbia University.

    During the 2021-2022 academic year, Mejgan is teaching "Why College?", "Design that Understands Us", and "Environmental Sustainability: Global Predicaments and Possible Solutions."

  • Sangeeta Mediratta

    Sangeeta Mediratta

    PWR Lecturer

    BioSangeeta Mediratta returns to PWR after a sojourn in Stanford Global Studies as Associate Director. She has served as Teaching Fellow and then Lecturer over five years in the past and returns with ever-greater enthusiasm for the teaching of writing and for working with her students. At Stanford, she has taught classes on rhetoric and writing, literature and film. Her PWR classes currently focus on maps, borders, networks, objects, and objectification. She loves learning about and helping her students develop their personalized research projects.

    She completed her Ph.D. from University of California, San Diego in English Literature. Her dissertation :Bazaars, Cannibals, and Sepoys: Sensationalism and Transnational Cultures of Empire" studied at the ways texts, objects, and spectacles in the U.S. and Britain drew upon imperial stories and objects to critique contemporary social evils such as slavery, class injustice, and the Corn Laws. She has also written on world cinema, popular culture, disability studies, as well as gender and race studies.

    Her current research focuses on the materiality of writing and on how students use culture as a way to build campus communities. She is also interested in student activism and empathy as a mode of living, connecting, writing, and being.

  • Kevin C. Moore

    Kevin C. Moore

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsForthcoming Work:

    "Wrestling with the Far Right: Ellison's Representations of Fascism." Ralph Ellison in Context. Paul Devlin, ed. Cambridge University Press. Accepted January 2020.

  • Gabrielle Moyer

    Gabrielle Moyer

    Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Poetics of Art History; The Relation of Ethics and Aesthetics; Analytic Philosophy; Essayism

  • Tiffany Naiman

    Tiffany Naiman

    Lecturer

    BioTiffany Naiman is a lecturer in The Stanford Storytelling Project (SSP) and is the managing editor and a producer for The Storytelling Project’s podcast, State of the Human. She is also the manager of the Braden Grant Program at Stanford University. Prior to her appointment in SSP, Tiffany was a Thinking Matters Fellow at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Musicology from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2017, where she also holds an appointment in the Herb Alpert School of Music’s music industry program. She teaches classes on listening, audio storytelling, music industry, aging in popular music, sound studies, concept records, David Bowie, and the history of the Blues, Punk, EDM, and Rock & Roll.

    Tiffany also holds master's degrees in African American Studies and Musicology, and a B.A. in American Literature and Culture, all from UCLA. She is a recipient of UCLA’s Dissertation Year Fellowship and Distinguished Teaching Award in Musicology and holder of graduate certificates in Digital Humanities and Experimental Critical Theory. As a scholar of popular music, temporality, disability studies, and the voice, her dissertation, Singing at Death’s Door: Late Style, Disability, and the Temporality of Illness in Popular Music, reflects on musical and cultural responses to illness, disability, and dying while contributing to our understanding of the social significance of popular music in regard to these areas. Tiffany has developed a specialization as a David Bowie scholar and her work is published in The Bloomsbury Handbook of Popular Music Video Analysis (Bloomsbury, 2019), David Bowie: Critical Perspectives (Routledge, 2015) and Enchanting David Bowie: Space/Time/Body/Memory (Bloomsbury, 2015). She another new chapter on Bowie coming out in 2020 in Blackstar Rising & the Purple Reign: Pop Culture & the (After)Lives of David Bowie & Prince (Duke University Press, 2020). She is currently working simultaneously on two monographs; David Bowie in America and Live Through This: Women and the Politics of Illness and Aging in Popular Music.

    Along with her musicological research and teaching, Tiffany is an award-winning documentary film producer, DJ, electronic musician, and the experimental film and music programmer for the Outfest Film Festival in Los Angeles. Her film productions have been screened world wide in festivals, at art museums, in theaters, and have been released digitally. The films include Bight of the Twin (2016), The Glamour & The Squalor (2015), The Cardboard Artist (2015), Exile Nation: The Plastic People (2014), Viva Cuba Libre: Rap Is War (2013), and The Mechanical Bride (2012). She is currently in production with two new films: Welcome to My Daydream (2020) and Revival: Confessions of the Queer and Unholy (2020).

    Tiffany devotes a large portion of her free time to attending live musical performances. She also enjoys spending time in nature photographing wildlife.

  • Miles Osgood

    Miles Osgood

    SLE Lecturer

    BioMiles Osgood is a Lecturer for Structured Liberal Education (SLE). As a former Stanford undergrad, Miles completed his BA in English with a minor in the Classics in 2011. After working at Oxford University Press in New York for two years, Miles earned a PhD in English at Harvard, where he designed and taught courses on global modernism, women's literature, and James Joyce. He has published public essays in Slate, n+1, and the Washington Post, along with academic articles in Modernism/modernity and ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature.

    Miles is at work on a book entitled "The Podium and the Stadium," which uncovers the little-known history of the Olympic Art Competitions of 1912-1948 and argues that twentieth-century world literature self-consciously adopted the qualities of international sport. Across studies of Olympic participants including Robert Graves, Jean Cocteau, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and Bunya Koh, and through analysis of sport in the work of H.D., Ralph Ellison, Marianne Moore, and Kamau Brathwaite, "The World Arena" documents the surprisingly pervasive genre of "athletic art" across major axes of twentieth-century culture.

    Miles has been working in frosh education for many years, starting when he was a Resident Tutor as a Stanford senior and continuing with his time as a Teaching Fellow for Harvard's "Expos" writing program. From 2016 to 2018, Miles also created and developed "J(oyce)-Term," a one-week winter-break bootcamp on Joyce's "Ulysses" for first-year students. He has extended his teaching to high-school students and lifelong learners online as designer and lead instructor for the "Masterpieces of World Literature" series on edX.

    In his spare time, Miles designs board games, edits home movies, and walks around San Francisco with his dog Pico.

  • Eldon Pei

    Eldon Pei

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSpecialisation: world cinema; documentary film; post-war visual cultures; East and Southeast Asian studies; propaganda; media, technology and society; critical theory; postcolonialism

  • John Peterson

    John Peterson

    Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATIONS: Social Media and Changes to Mass Media; Art Versus Commerce; Liberal Arts Education & Public Schools; Social/Racial Justice; Consumer Culture; Music & Film; Technology & Learning; Public Policy

  • Sarah Pittock

    Sarah Pittock

    Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Writing Across the Curriculum; Writing In the Disciplines; Tutoring Pedagogy; Rhetoric of Children's Culture; 18th-Century Studies

  • Emily Polk

    Emily Polk

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Facilitation and Mobilization of Social Movements in the Digital and Public Spheres; Communication of Community-Led Responses to Climate Change; the Role and Impact of Scholar Activism; Participatory Research; Rhetoric of Sustainability and Resiliency; Rhetoric of Global and Local Development

  • Belinda Ramírez

    Belinda Ramírez

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    BioBelinda Ramírez received their PhD in sociocultural anthropology from the University of California San Diego. Their dissertation research dealt with the social, political, and economic dimensions of urban agriculture in the San Diego-Tijuana metropolitan region. While researching these topics, Belinda was exposed to the fulfillment found in experiential learning and working firsthand to change their local food system, receiving agricultural training through local farms and their involvement with community gardens in southern San Diego. They have also engaged in statewide political advocacy for young farmers through the National Young Farmers Coalition, served as both Board and Food Justice Co-Chair for Slow Food Urban San Diego, and worked as a Soil Farmer for Food2Soil.

    Considering themself a farmer-scholar, Belinda is excited to delve into the worlds of (urban) agriculture and food justice in the Bay Area and to share the importance of this work with incoming students in the COLLEGE program. Looking to the future, Belinda is excited to contribute to the transformation of the global food system through agricultural education efforts based within their own food production spaces as well as through political advocacy, teaching, and writing.

  • Stephanie Reist

    Stephanie Reist

    Lecturer

    BioStephanie Virginia Reist is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education at Stanford University. Prior to coming to Stanford, she was a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Education Department at the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, financed by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. She completed a PhD in Romance Studies with a focus on Latin American Cultural Studies as well as a Master's in Public Policy at Duke University in 2018. She holds a BA in Comparative Literature from Williams College.

    Her research and writing focus on issues of race, public policy, Black feminisms, cultural production, youth, and urban belonging in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Specifically, she is interested in the relationship between youth movements and access to higher education in Rio's predominately black, working class urban peripheries. As part of her commitment to public scholarship, her writing has been featured in RioOnWatch, Times Higher Education, The Independent and Jacobin Magazine.

    She also co-directed a short documentary on expanded access to higher education in Brazil that can be seen here: https://youtu.be/Q_60CIxvLHY

  • Rebecca Richardson

    Rebecca Richardson

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: The Rhetoric of Inspiration and Self-Help; Nineteenth-Century British Literature; Environmental Studies; The Medical Humanities; Expressive Writing and Self-Reflection

  • Katherine Rothschild

    Katherine Rothschild

    Lecturer

    BioKatherine Rothschild, MFA, PhD, is a Lecturer in the Program for Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford University where she teaches PWR 1, The Rhetoric of Innovation: Transformation and Missed Opportunities and PWR 2, Innovative Conservation Communication: The Rhetoric of Everyday Change. She is currently completing an NCTE grant-funded multi-institutional study of writing knowledge transfer into STEM disciplines. She has conducted studies and published on writerly identity in STEM disciplines, feminist social media rhetorics, visibility language, and egalitarian classroom models. She is also the author of the novel Wider than the Sky (PRH/Soho Teen), and a contributor to KQED/NPR, among other outlets.

  • Kim Savelson

    Kim Savelson

    Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Design Thinking for Writing & Research; Science and Health Communication; Storytelling; Creativity Studies; Innovation Across the Disciplines

  • Sam Sax

    Sam Sax

    Lecturer

    BioSam Sax is a writer, performer, and educator currently serving as an ITALIC Lecturer at Stanford University. They're the author of Madness, winner of The National Poetry Series and ‘Bury It’ winner of the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets. They're the two time Bay Area Grand Slam Champion with poems published in The New York Times, Poetry Magazine, Granta and elsewhere. Sam's received fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, MacDowell, The Poetry Foundation, and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University.

  • Tesla Schaeffer

    Tesla Schaeffer

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: 20th Century Rhetoric and Literature; Trauma Studies; Theories of Affect and Emotion; Rhetorics of the Academy; Composition Pedagogy

  • Julia Schulte

    Julia Schulte

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestspeer review, reading strategies, reflection, native speakerism in ESL

  • Lynn Sokei

    Lynn Sokei

    Lecturer

    BioLynn Sokei holds a PhD in English from the University of Colorado at Boulder and an MFA in Fiction from Arizona State University.

  • Jennifer Stonaker

    Jennifer Stonaker

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Electronic Portfolios; Science Communication; Science Storytelling

  • Lisa Marie Swan

    Lisa Marie Swan

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Composition Pedagogy; Equity; Faculty Professional Development

  • Kathleen Tarr

    Kathleen Tarr

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Jurisprudence; Rhetoric and Climate Catastrophe; Strategic Planning in International Relations and Governments; Rhetoric and Global Economy; and Equal Employment Opportunity in the Entertainment Industry

  • Mai Wang

    Mai Wang

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    BioMai Wang is a Lecturer and Teaching Fellow for the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education program. Mai completed her PhD in English at Stanford in 2021. She also holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Boston University and a BA in English from Yale University. Her research and teaching interests include Asian American studies, transnational Chinese and Southeast Asian studies, multicultural American literature, and critical translation theory. Her fiction and scholarship has appeared in Amerasia Journal, The Walt Whitman Quaterly Review, The Hopkins Review, Hyphen Magazine, and other publications.

    Mai is currently working on a book project entitled "The Nonaligned Self: Asian Redeployments of the American Renaissance," which examines a network of affiliations that emerged between a group of Asian American and Chinese diasporic writers and their nineteenth-century predecessors from the American Renaissance. In the twentieth century, Asian writers living in the West revived the defense of the free individual found in the Anglo-American tradition of liberalism in order to imagine new forms of provisional belonging in a pluralistic society. Sustained transhistorical exchanges with the literary past enabled Asian writers living in exile as well as their Asian American counterparts to articulate muted critiques of American capitalist hegemony as well as Communist repression in places like mainland China. Asian writers instrumentalized the defense of liberalism they encountered in the writings of authors such as Emerson, Whitman, Hawthorne, and Douglass in order to invent a vision of nonaligned selfhood that was global in its aspirations, even as it sought to challenge the exclusionary limits of nation-states, whether they were Communist totalitarian regimes or Western multicultural democracies.

    In her spare time, Mai enjoys cooking, trying new restaurants, and exploring the Bay Area.

  • Gregory Watkins

    Gregory Watkins

    Lecturer

    BioGreg has taught in Structured Liberal Education (SLE) since 2002. He has a BA in Social Theory (a self-designed major) from Stanford, with Honors in Humanities, an MFA in Film Production from UCLA, and a dual PhD in Religious Studies and Humanities from Stanford, also from Stanford. Greg's research interests hover around the intersection of film and religion, and he continues to work on a variety of film projects.

  • Roberta Wolfson

    Roberta Wolfson

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests20th and 21st Century Multiethnic U.S. Literatures, Comparative Ethnic Studies, Critical Mixed Race Studies, Racial and Social Justice, Ethnofuturist Speculative Fiction, Popular U.S. Culture, Risk and Security Studies

  • Cassie Wright

    Cassie Wright

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Writing Program Administration; Rhetorical Theory, Writing Studies and Assessment, Critical Discourse Analysis , Sports Rhetorics

  • Irena Yamboliev

    Irena Yamboliev

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Literature and Culture of 19th- and 20th-Century Britain; Aesthetics; Narrative Theory; Science and its Rhetoric; Color Theory; Digital Humanities; Writing Pedagogy; Queer Theory

  • John Young

    John Young

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioJohn Young is a lecturer in Civic, Liberal and Global Education (COLLEGE). John completed his Bachelor's at Dartmouth College before earning his M.S. and PhD in Political Science at Stanford University.

    John’s research focuses on the built environment, and brings together scholarship from political theory, geography, economics, and psychology. Three big questions orient his work. How does the built environment affect the people who live in and move through it? How do laws, economics, and technology produce the built environment we have? Finally, do people have normative and political entitlements to physical space, and if so, what are they and how can they be secured in public space, private space, and with land-use policy?

    John also works as a carpenter, building and repairing residential structures. John finds it deeply rewarding to help people enjoy their home and get more practical use from it, putting theory and practice together to create built environments conducive to human flourishing.