Graduate School of Education


Showing 21-30 of 423 Results

  • Adam Banks

    Adam Banks

    Professor of Education

    BioCommitted teacher. Midnight Believer. A Slow Jam in a Hip Hop world. Cerebral and silly, outgoing and a homebody. Vernacular and grounded but academic and idealistic too. Convinced that Donny Hathaway is the most compelling artist of the entire soul and funk era, and that we still don't give Patrice Rushen enough love. I'm a crate digger, and DJ with words and ideas, and I believe that the people, voices and communities we bring with us to Stanford are every bit as important as those with which we engage here at Stanford.

    Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, I come to Stanford from the University of Kentucky, where I served on the faculty of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies and prior to that, from Syracuse University, as a member of the faculty of the Writing Program. In addition to these appointments I served as the Langston Hughes Visiting Professor of English at the University of Kansas and, jointly with Andrea Lunsford, as the Rocky Gooch Visiting Professor for the Bread Loaf School of English.

    My scholarship lies at the intersections of writing, rhetoric and technology issues; my specialized interests include African American rhetoric, community literacy, digital rhetorics and digital humanities. My most recent book is titled Digital Griots: African American Rhetoric in a Multimedia Age, and my current digital/book project is titled Technologizing Funk/Funkin Technology: Critical Digital Literacies and the Trope of the Talking Book.

  • Ralph Banks

    Ralph Banks

    The Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioRalph Richard Banks (BA ’87, MA ’87) is the Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor, by courtesy, at the School of Education. A native of Cleveland, Ohio and a graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Law School (JD 1994), Banks has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 1998. Prior to joining the law school, he practiced law at O’Melveny & Myers, was the Reginald F. Lewis Fellow at Harvard Law School and clerked for a federal judge, the Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. (then of the Southern District of New York). Professor Banks teaches and writes about family law, employment discrimination law and race and the law. He is the author of Is Marriage for White People? How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone. At Stanford, he is affiliated with the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and the Ethnicity, the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. His writings have appeared in a wide range of popular and scholarly publications, including the Stanford Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. He has been interviewed and quoted by numerous print and broadcast media, including ABC News/Nightline, National Public Radio, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

  • Donald Barr

    Donald Barr

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, at the Graduate School of Education

    BioDonald Barr is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Stanford School of Medicine, and Professor by Courtesy in the Graduate School of Education. He teaches in the Undergraduate Program in Human Biology, where he helped to found Human Biology's curriculum in health policy. His research has studied the effect of the organizational structure of the U.S. medical care delivery system on the quality of primary care. He has also studied cultural and linguistic barriers to health care access for low-income patients, and factors associated with higher rates of attrition from pre-medical studies among minority students at Stanford and other universities. The fourth edition of his book, Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing, and Delivery of Health Care in America, was published in 2016. The third edition of his book, Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity and the Social Determinants of Health, was published in 2019. In June 2003 Dr. Barr was awarded the Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contribution to Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. In 2006 he received the Miriam Aaron Roland Prize, which recognizes Stanford faculty who engage and involve students in integrating academic scholarship with significant and meaningful volunteer service to society.

  • Brigid Barron

    Brigid Barron

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include the longitudinal documentation of learner pathways to engagement, studies of families as technology-supported learning teams, and the roles that personal learning networks play in catalyzing and sustaining interest-driven learning She is founder of the YouthLAB at Stanford, and a co-lead of TELOS, a Stanford Graduate School of Education Initiative to investigate how technologies can provide more equitable access to learning opportunities.