Graduate School of Education


Showing 11-20 of 419 Results

  • anthony lising antonio

    anthony lising antonio

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransitions to postsecondary education; racial, ethnic, and religious minority college student development.

  • Nicole Ardoin

    Nicole Ardoin

    Director, E-IPER, Associate Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCommunity Involvement
    Community/Youth Development and Organizations
    Diversity
    Environmental Education
    Ethnography
    Evaluation
    Organizations
    Qualitative Research Methods

  • Emma Armstrong-Carter

    Emma Armstrong-Carter

    Ph.D. Student in Education, admitted Autumn 2018
    Other Tech - Graduate, Obradvic Program

    BioAs children go about their day at home and at school, their bodies respond to environmental experiences. In particular, children’s bodies respond via changes in stress- physiology, the physiological systems which maintain homeostasis and adapt to contextual stimuli. My research program centers around children’s stress-physiology. I investigate (1) How children’s experiences at home (e.g., parent child relationships, family structures, routines) are associated with variability in their stress-physiology; and (2) How children’s physiological responses in turn are associated with their positive school-related adaptation (e.g., positive peer relationships, self-regulated behavior, cognitive skills, academic achievement).

    My goal is to elucidate the environmental predictors and developmental consequences of children’s physiological responses to their daily environments. To index stress-physiology, I use measures of the autonomic nervous system (including sympathetic and parasympathetic branches), and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis (which regulates levels of the hormone cortisol). Building on prior research which has focused on macro-level predictors of children’s stress physiology (e.g., family socio-economic status, ongoing experiences of severe adversity or maltreatment), I focus on smaller-scale, normative, daily experiences (e.g., family structures, relationships, and routines). My research is grounded in a positive youth development framework (Lerner, Phelps, Forman, & Bowers, 2009), highlighting children’s strengths and abilities to contribute to the lives of others (e.g., by helping peers and family, and engaging positively with in the classroom).

    Beginning in the Summer of 2021, I will be entering the academic job market for assistant professor positions at research universities. If you are interested in my work, please contact me at emmaac@stanford.edu!

  • Alfredo J. Artiles

    Alfredo J. Artiles

    Lee L. Jacks Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    BioDr. Artiles is Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education. His programmatic work engages the questions “how do educational equity remedies create new injustices and what are effective ways to reduce these paradoxes?” His scholarship examines the dual nature of disability as an object of protection and a tool of stratification. More specifically, he aims to understand how responses to disability intersections with race, social class and language advance or hinder educational opportunities for disparate groups of students. For instance, he is studying the cultural-historical contexts of racial disparities in special education and whether a disability diagnosis is associated with differential consequences for minoritized groups (e.g., segregation, quality and type of services). He and his colleagues have led national and regional technical assistance initiatives at the state and school district levels to address these equity paradoxes. Current research projects include:

    * Examining the role of sociocultural influences (e.g., histories of racial inequities in communities and schools) in educators’ interpretations and responses to chronic school district citations for racial disparities in special education.
    * Mapping the changing meanings of “disability” and “inclusive education” and the ways in which disability-race intersections appear and disappear across identification policies, practices and settings at the district and school levels.
    * Piloting a participatory model with youth of color with/without disabilities grounded in the arts and humanities to (re)structure school discipline policies and practices.
    * Documenting teachers’ struggles with the second language-learning disability dilemma during instructional processes prior to referring dual language learners to special education.
    * Analyzing equity consequences of inclusive education implementation in Global South nations.

    Dr. Artiles is Honorary Professor at the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) and received an honorary doctorate from the University of Göteborgs (Sweden). He served on the Obama White House Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. Dr. Artiles received mentoring awards from The Spencer Foundation, the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and Arizona State University. Artiles is an elected member of the National Academy of Education and Fellow of AERA, the Learning Policy Institute and the National Education Policy Center. He was a resident fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. The 2011 article based on his Wallace Lecture, “Toward an interdisciplinary understanding of educational equity and difference: The case of the racialization of ability” received AERA’s Palmer O. Johnson Award. His paper “Objects of protection, enduring nodes of difference: Disability intersections with “other” differences, 1916 – 2016” (with S. Dorn & A. Bal) won the 2017 AERA Review of Research Award.

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and a Faculty Leader at Stanford’s Center for Longevity. He earned a B.A. cum laude from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford.

    He has published more than 100 academic papers, in interdisciplinary journals such as Science, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and PLoS One, as well domain-specific journals in the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for 15 years.

    Bailenson consults pro bono on Virtual Reality policy for government agencies including the State Department, the US Senate, Congress, the California Supreme Court, the Federal Communication Committee, the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, and the National Institutes of Health.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court outlining the effects of immersive media. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for The Washington Post, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed five Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab’s research has exhibited publicly at museums and aquariums, including a permanent installation at the San Jose Tech Museum.

  • Arnetha F. Ball

    Arnetha F. Ball

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLanguage, Literacies, and Studies in Teacher Professional Development; research on the writing and writing instruction of culturally and linguistically diverse students; preparing teachers to teach diverse student populations in culturally and linguistically complex classrooms; linking sociocultural and linguistic theory to educational practice; and using the linguistic resources present among culturally diverse populations to enhance curriculum and instruction. She is currently conducting research on the implementation of her "Model of Generative Change" (Ball 2009) in pre-service teacher education, inservice teacher professional development, and a secondary pipeline program designed to "grow our own next generation of excellent teachers for urban schools." Over the last few years she has been collecting data in New Zealand, South Africa, Australia, and the United States on the preparation of teachers to work with historically marginalized populations. Her research on the use of writing as a pedagogical tool to facilitate generative thinking is ongoing and her most recent project looks at the development of blended online learning environments that are designed to prepare teachers to work effectively with diverse student populations in transnational contexts.