Bio-X


Showing 51-100 of 878 Results

  • Jon Bernstein

    Jon Bernstein

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include the genetics of autism and other developmental disorders. In collaboration with colleagues at Stanford, I am working to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of genetic disorders associated with developmental disability. I am also engaged in the application of new technologies (Whole genome sequencing, Multi-omics profiling) for the diagnosis of developmental disorders.

  • Michael Bernstein

    Michael Bernstein

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioMichael Bernstein is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, where he is a member of the Human-Computer Interaction group. His research focuses on the design of crowdsourcing and social computing systems. His research has received numerous best paper awards at premier computing venues, and his Ph.D. students have gone on both to industry (e.g., Adobe Research, Facebook Data Science) and faculty positions (e.g., Carnegie Mellon, UC Berkeley). Michael has been recognized as a Robert N. Noyce Family Faculty Scholar, and has received an NSF CAREER award, an Outstanding Academic Title citation from the American Library Association, and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship. He holds a bachelor's degree in Symbolic Systems from Stanford University, as well as a master's degree and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT.

  • William Berquist

    William Berquist

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastroenterology, gastointestinal motility, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  • Mark Berry, MD

    Mark Berry, MD

    Mylavarapu Rogers Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Berry joined the Division of Thoracic Surgery at Stanford in August 2014. He came to Stanford from Duke University, where he had most recently served as Associate Professor. He received his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine after receiving bachelors and masters degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Duke University Medical Center after performing a residency in General Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. His Cardiothoracic Surgical training included a year dedicated to Minimally Invasive General Thoracic Surgery, a period that also included an American Association for Thoracic Surgery sponsored Traveling Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Dr. Berry practices all aspects of thoracic surgery, including procedures for benign and malignant conditions of the lung, esophagus, and mediastinum. He has a particular interest in minimally invasive techniques, and has extensive experience in treating thoracic surgical conditions using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS), laparoscopic, robotic, endoscopic, and bronchoscopic approaches. He serves as the co-Director of the Stanford Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Center (SMITS), and has both directed and taught in several minimally invasive thoracic surgery courses.

    Dr. Berry also has a Masters of Health Sciences in Clinical Research from Duke University. His clinical research activities mirror his clinical interests and activities in optimizing short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with thoracic surgical conditions. He has more than sixty peer-reviewed publications, most of which are related to both the use of minimally invasive thoracic surgical techniques as well as evaluating outcomes after treatment of thoracic malignancies. His clinical practice and his research both focus on choosing the most appropriate treatment and approach for patients based on the individual characteristics of the patient and their disease process.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmolecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Alice Bertaina

    Alice Bertaina

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bertaina is a highly experienced clinician and will play a key role in supporting Section Chief Dr. Rajni Agarwal and Clinical Staff in the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. She will also continue her research on immune recovery and miRNA, understanding the mechanisms underlying immune reconstitution, Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT in pediatric patients affected by hematological malignant and non-malignant disorders.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Director, ChEM-H, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    BioProfessor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, and the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, among many others. Her efforts in undergraduate education have earned the UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award and the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

    Today, the Bertozzi Group at Stanford studies the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, and infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. The work has advanced understanding of cell surface oligosaccharides involved in cell recognition and inter-cellular communication.

    Dr. Bertozzi's lab also develops new methods to perform controlled chemical reactions within living systems. The group has developed new tools for studying glycans in living systems, and more recently nanotechnologies for probing biological systems. Such "bioorthogonal" chemistries enable manipulation of biomolecules in their living environment.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi founded Redwood Bioscience of Emeryville, California, and has served on the research advisory board of GlaxoSmithKline.

  • Vivek Bhalla, MD

    Vivek Bhalla, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bhalla's two primary research interests are in the role of the kidney in diabetes and hypertension. We use molecular, biochemical, and transgenic approaches to study: (1) mechanisms diabetic kidney disease disease including the role of the endothelium to regulate inflammation and kidney injury; and (2) regulation of tubular transport of glucose, sodium, and potassium. These latter studies have treatment implications in diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension.

  • Ami Bhatt

    Ami Bhatt

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Bhatt lab is exploring how the microbiota is intertwined with states of health and disease. We apply the most modern genetic tools in an effort to deconvolute the mechanism of human diseases.

  • Nidhi Bhutani

    Nidhi Bhutani

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of our research is to understand the fundamental mechanisms that govern and reprogram cellular fate during development, regeneration and disease.

  • Lacramioara Bintu

    Lacramioara Bintu

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

    BioLacra Bintu is an Assistant Professor in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford. Her lab performs single-cell measurements of chromatin and gene regulation dynamics, and uses these data to develop predictive models of basic biological processes and improve mammalian cell engineering.

    Lacra started working on the theory of gene regulation as an undergraduate with Jané Kondev from Brandeis University and Rob Phillips from Caltech. As a Physics PhD student in the lab of Carlos Bustamante at U.C. Berkeley, she used single-molecule methods to tease apart the molecular mechanisms of transcription through nucleosomes. She transitioned to studying the dynamics of epigenetic regulation in live cells during her postdoctoral fellowship with Michael Elowitz at Caltech. She started her own interdisciplinary lab at Stanford in January 2017.

  • Julius Bishop, MD

    Julius Bishop, MD

    Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bishop specializes in treating fractures of the upper extremity, lower extremity, pelvis and acetabulum as well as the management of post-traumatic problems including malunion, nonunion and infection.

    He received his undergraduate and medical school degrees from Harvard University and went on to complete the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program. He pursued his subspecialty training in Orthopaedic Traumatology at the world-renowned Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington.

    His research interests include applying decision analysis models to orthopaedic trauma problems, studying clinical outcomes after musculoskeletal injury, orthopaedic biomechanics, the basic science of fracture healing, and evaluating new strategies and techniques in fracture surgery.

  • Sandip Biswal, MD

    Sandip Biswal, MD

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe management of individuals suffering from chronic pain is unfortunately limited by poor diagnostic tests and therapies. Our research group is interested in 'imaging pain' by using novel imaging techniques to study peripheral nociception and inflammation with the goal of accurately identifying the location of pain generators. We are developing new approaches with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (PET/MRI) and are currently in clinical trials.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor and Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Catherine Blish

    Catherine Blish

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major goal of our research is to gain insight into the prevention and control of HIV and other viral pathogens by studying the interplay between the virus and the host immune response. We investigate the role of various arms of the immune response, but with a particular focus on NK cells. We hope to gain additional insights into control of infectious diseases by studying how pregnancy modulates immune responses.

  • Steven M. Block

    Steven M. Block

    The Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D., Professor and Professor of Applied Physics and of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle molecule biophysics using optical trapping and fluorescence

  • Mark S. Blumenkranz

    Mark S. Blumenkranz

    H. J. Smead Professor of Ophthalmology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interest and Research
    My primary areas of interest are in the diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of vitreal retinal diseases. These principally include age-related macular degeneration and other diseases of the macula, and tractional syndromes, diabetic retinopathy, and complex forms of retinal detachment. I have been interested in the development of novel technology to diagnose and treat these diseases, including new forms of imaging, laser delivery systems, other microsurgical tools, and new drugs and drug delivery systems that inhibit new blood vessel growth, scarring and intraocular inflammation. I have been actively involved in translational research in the laboratory as well as technology transfer associated with that research for a variety of new therapies that have received FDA clearance and been introduced into clinical practice over the past 30 years.

    Administrative and Community Service
    I have served on the Board of Directors of a variety of voluntary education and service organizations, including the Corporation of Brown University, multiple scientific advisory boards and various philanthropic and research organizations.

  • Kwabena Boahen

    Kwabena Boahen

    Professor of Bioengineering and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLarge-scale models of sensory, perceptual and motor systems

  • Alexandria Boehm

    Alexandria Boehm

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMy primary research area is coastal water quality, and recently I have expanded my research to include activities on sanitation more broadly. The work on coastal water quality is focused on understanding the sources, transformation, transport, and ecology of biocolloids - specifically fecal indicator organisms, pathogens, and phytoplankton, as well as sources and fate of nitrogen and phosphorus. This knowledge is crucial to directing new policies, and management and engineering practices that protect human and ecosystem health along the coastal margin. The work on sanitation aims to develop microbial risk assessment models to gain a better understanding of how pathogens are transmitted to humans through their contact with water, feces, and contaminated surfaces. Research is focused on key problems in developed and developing countries. The goal is to design and test effective interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of infectious disease.

  • Alistair Boettiger

    Alistair Boettiger

    Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab focuses on investigating the role of three-dimensional genome organization in regulating gene expression and in shaping cell fate specification during development. We pursue this with advanced single-molecule imaging and transgenics.

  • Carol Boggs

    Carol Boggs

    Bing Director in Human Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in how environmental variation affects life history traits, population structure and dynamics, and species interactions in ecological and evolutionary time, using Lepidoptera.

  • Matthew Bogyo

    Matthew Bogyo

    Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab uses chemical, biochemical, and cell biological methods to study protease function in human disease. Projects include:

    1) Design and synthesis of novel chemical probes for serine and cysteine hydrolases.

    2) Understanding the role of hydrolases in bacterial pathogenesis and the human parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

    3) Defining the specific functional roles of proteases during the process of tumorogenesis.

    4) In vivo imaging of protease activity

  • Cara Bohon

    Cara Bohon

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Development) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests have focused on the neural bases of eating disorders and obesity. I am particularly interested in the way emotion and reward is processed in the brain and how that may contribute to eating behavior and food restriction. I hope to eventually translate biological research findings into treatments.

  • C. Andrew Bonham

    C. Andrew Bonham

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTolerance induction in liver transplantation.
    Hepatocyte transplantation.

  • John  Boothroyd

    John Boothroyd

    Burt and Marion Avery Professor of Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are intereseted in the interaction between the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and its mammalian host. We use a combination of molecular and genetic tools to understand how this obligate intracellular parasite can invade almost any cell it encounters, how it co-opts a host cell once inside and how it evades the immune response to produce a life-long, persistent infection.

  • Linda Boxer, MD, PhD

    Linda Boxer, MD, PhD

    Vice Dean of the School of Medicine and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulation of expression of oncogenes in normal and malignant hematologic cells.

  • Steven Boxer

    Steven Boxer

    Camille Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlease visit my website for complete information:
    http://www.stanford.edu/group/boxer/

  • Kevin Boyce

    Kevin Boyce

    Professor of Geological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPaleontology; Evolution of plant physiology & development; Geochemistry of fossil preservation; Evolution of terrestrial ecosystems and environments

  • Scott Boyd, MD PhD

    Scott Boyd, MD PhD

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to understand the lymphocyte genotype-phenotype relationships in healthy human immunity and in immunological diseases. We apply new technologies and data analysis approaches to this challenge, particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and single-cell monoclonal antibody generation, in parallel with other functional assays.

  • Stephen Boyd

    Stephen Boyd

    Samsung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Management Science and Engineering

    BioStephen P. Boyd is the Samsung Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. He has courtesy appointments in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, and is member of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. His current research focus is on convex optimization applications in control, signal processing, machine learning, and finance.

    Professor Boyd received an AB degree in Mathematics, summa cum laude, from Harvard University in 1980, and a PhD in EECS from U. C. Berkeley in 1985. In 1985 he joined the faculty of Stanford's Electrical Engineering Department. He has held visiting Professor positions at Katholieke University (Leuven), McGill University (Montreal), Ecole Polytechnique Federale (Lausanne), Tsinghua University (Beijing), Universite Paul Sabatier (Toulouse), Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm), Kyoto University, Harbin Institute of Technology, NYU, MIT, UC Berkeley, CUHK-Shenzhen, and IMT Lucca. He holds honorary doctorates from Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, and Catholic University of Louvain (UCL).

    Professor Boyd is the author of many research articles and four books: Introduction to Applied Linear Algeba: Vectors, Matrices, and Least-Squares (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2018), Convex Optimization (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory (with L. El Ghaoui, E. Feron, and V. Balakrishnan, 1994), and Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced many open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), CVXPY (with Steven Diamond) and Convex.jl (with Madeleine Udell and others), widely used parser-solvers for convex optimization.

    Professor Boyd has received many awards and honors for his research in control systems engineering and optimization, including an ONR Young Investigator Award, a Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the AACC Donald P. Eckman Award. In 2013, he received the IEEE Control Systems Award, given for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. In 2012, Michael Grant and he were given the Mathematical Optimization Society's Beale-Orchard-Hays Award, given every three years for excellence in computational mathematical programming. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, SIAM, and INFORMS, a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Control Systems Society, and a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering. He has been invited to deliver more than 90 plenary and keynote lectures at major conferences in control, optimization, signal processing, and machine learning.

    He has developed and taught many undergraduate and graduate courses, including Signals & Systems, Linear Dynamical Systems, Convex Optimization, and a recent undergraduate course on Matrix Methods. His graduate convex optimization course attracts around 300 students from more than 20 departments. In 1991 he received an ASSU Graduate Teaching Award, and in 1994 he received the Perrin Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in the School of Engineering. In 2003, he received the AACC Ragazzini Education award, for contributions to control education, with citation: “For excellence in classroom teaching, textbook and monograph preparation, and undergraduate and graduate mentoring of students in the area of systems, control, and optimization.” In 2016 he received the Walter J. Gores award, the highest award for teaching at Stanford University. In 2017 he received the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE, with citation "For inspirational education of students and researchers in the theory and application of optimization."

  • Mark Brongersma

    Mark Brongersma

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioMark Brongersma is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Materials Science from the FOM Institute in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 1998. From 1998-2001 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the California Institute of Technology. During this time, he coined the term “Plasmonics” for a new device technology that exploits the unique optical properties of nanoscale metallic structures to route and manipulate light at the nanoscale. His current research is directed towards the development and physical analysis of nanostructured materials that find application in nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. Brongersma received a National Science Foundation Career Award, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, the International Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences (Physics) for his work on plasmonics, and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the SPIE, and the American Physical Society.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • James D. Brooks

    James D. Brooks

    Keith and Jan Hurlbut Professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genomic approaches to identify disease biomarkers. We are most interested in translating biomarkers into clinical practice in urological diseases with a particular focus in cancer.

  • Gordon Brown

    Gordon Brown

    Dorrell William Kirby Professor of Geology in the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurface and interface geochemistry; environmental fate of heavy metals; nanotechnology, applications of synchrotron radiation in geochemistry and mineralogy

  • Martin Brown

    Martin Brown

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe seek to understand the mechanisms responsible for the resistance of cancers to treatment and to develop strategies to overcome these resistances. We are using molecular and cellular techniques and mouse models to potentiate the activity of radiation on tumors by inhibiting the bone marrow rescue of the tumor vasculature following therapy.

  • Patrick O. Brown

    Patrick O. Brown

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Brown, currently an emeritus professor, is CEO and founder of Impossible Foods, a company dedicated to replacing the world's most destructive technology - the use of animals to transform plant biomass into meat, fish and dairy foods - by developing a new and better way to produce the world's most delicious, nutritious and affordable meats, fish and dairy foods directly from plants. Visit impossiblefoods.com for more information.

  • Anne Brunet

    Anne Brunet

    Michele and Timothy Barakett Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the molecular basis of longevity. We are interested in the mechanism of action of known longevity genes, including FOXO and SIRT, in the mammalian nervous system. We are particularly interested in the role of these longevity genes in neural stem cells. We are also discovering novel genes and processes involved in aging using two short-lived model systems, the invertebrate C. elegans and an extremely short-lived vertebrate, the African killifish N. furzeri.

  • Axel Brunger

    Axel Brunger

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, of Neurology, of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOne of Axel Brunger's major goals is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of synaptic neurotransmitter release by conducting imaging and single-molecule/particle reconstitution experiments, combined with near-atomic resolution structural studies of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery.

  • Douglas L. Brutlag

    Douglas L. Brutlag

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary interest is to understand the flow of information from the genome to the phenotype of an organism. This interest includes predicting the structure and function of genes and proteins from their primary sequence, predicting function from structure simulating protein folding and ligand docking, and predicitng disease from genome variations. These goals are the same as the goals of molecular biology, however, we use primarily computational approaches.

  • Zev Bryant

    Zev Bryant

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. My laboratory seeks to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work.

  • Bruce Buckingham

    Bruce Buckingham

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy major interest is in type 1 diabetes mellitus, continuous glucose sensor, and the development of an artificial pancreas. Other research interests include using continuous glucose monitoring and algorithms to control blood glucose levels in intensive care units.

  • Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD

    Professor of Comparative Medicine and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms of epilepsy, especially temporal lobe epilepsy.

  • Philip Bucksbaum

    Philip Bucksbaum

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and Professor of Photon Science, of Applied Physics, of Physics and Director, Stanford PULSE Institute

    BioPhil Bucksbaum holds the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Chair in Natural Science at Stanford University, with appointments in Physics, Applied Physics, and in Photon Science at SLAC. He conducts his research in the Stanford PULSE Institute (https://web.stanford.edu/~phbuck). He and his wife Roberta Morris live in Menlo Park, California with their cat. Their grown daughter lives in Toronto.

    Bucksbaum was born and raised in Iowa, and graduated from Harvard in 1975. He attended U.C. Berkeley on a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship and received his Ph.D. in 1980 for atomic parity violation experiments under Professor Eugene Commins, with whom he also has co-authored a textbook, “Weak Interactions of Leptons and Quarks.” In 1981 he joined Bell Laboratories, where he pursued new applications of ultrafast coherent radiation from terahertz to vacuum ultraviolet, including time-resolved VUV ARPES, and strong-field laser-atom physics.

    He joined the University of Michigan in 1990 and stayed for sixteen years, becoming Otto Laporte Collegiate Professor and then Peter Franken University Professor. He was founding Director of FOCUS, a National Science Foundation Physics Frontier Center, where he pioneered research using ultrafast lasers to control quantum systems. He also launched the first experiments in ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Lab. In 2006 Bucksbaum moved to Stanford and SLAC, and organized the PULSE Institute to develop research utilizing the world’s first hard x-ray free-electron laser, LCLS. In addition to directing PULSE, he has previously served as Department Chair of Photon Science and Division Director for Chemical Science at SLAC. His current research is in laser interrogation of atoms and molecules to explore and image structure and dynamics on the femtosecond scale. He currently has more than 250 publications.

    Bucksbaum is a Fellow of the APS and the Optical Society, and has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has held Guggenheim and Miller Fellowships, and was Optical Society President in 2014. He will serve as the President of the American Physical Society in 2020. He has led or participated in many professional service activities, including NAS studies, national and international boards, initiatives, lectureships and editorships.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how to make recovery faster and better after stroke.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy genetics research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. We focus on novel methods development for complex disease genetics and risk prediction in multi-ethnic settings. I am also interested in clinical data science and development of new diagnostics.I am also interested in disruptive innovation for healthcare including modeling long-term risk shifts and novel payment models.

  • Eugene Butcher

    Eugene Butcher

    Klaus Bensch Professor in Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur interests include:
    1) The physiology and function of lymphocyte homing in local and systemic immunity;
    2) Biochemical and genetic studies of molecules that direct leukocyte recruitment;
    3) Chemotactic mechanisms and receptors in vascular and immune biology;
    4) Vascular control of normal and pathologic inflammation and immunity;
    5) Systems biology of immune cell trafficking and programming in tumor immunity.

  • Robert Byer

    Robert Byer

    The William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor and Professor of Photon Science

    BioRobert L. Byer has served as President of The American Physical Society, of the Optical Society of America and of the IEEE LEOS. He has served as Vice Provost and Dean of Research at Stanford. He has been Chair of the Department of Applied Physics, Director of the Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory and Director of the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory. He is a founding member of the California Council on Science and Technology and served as Chair from 1995-1999. He was a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from 2002-2006 and has been a member of the National Ignition Facility since 2000.

    Robert L. Byer has conducted research and taught classes in lasers and nonlinear optics at Stanford University since 1969. He has made extraordinary contributions to laser science and technology including the demonstration of the first tunable visible parametric oscillator, the development of the Q-switched unstable resonator Nd:YAG laser, remote sensing using tunable infrared sources and precision spectroscopy using Coherent Anti Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS). Current research includes precision laser measurements in support of the detection of gravitational waves and laser “Accelerator on a chip”.