Bio-X


Showing 1,001-1,020 of 1,057 Results

  • Robert West

    Robert West

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRob West, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Pathology at Stanford University Medical Center. He is a clinician scientist with experience in translational genomics research to identify new prognostic and therapeutic markers in cancer. His research focus is on the progression of neoplasia to carcinoma. His lab has developed spatially oriented in situ methods to study archival specimens. He also serves as a surgical pathologist specializing in breast pathology.

  • Gordon Wetzstein

    Gordon Wetzstein

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGordon Wetzstein is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science at Stanford University. He is the leader of the Stanford Computational Imaging Lab and a faculty co-director of the Stanford Center for Image Systems Engineering. At the intersection of computer graphics and vision, artificial intelligence, computational optics, and applied vision science, Prof. Wetzstein's research has a wide range of applications in next-generation imaging, wearable computing, and neural rendering systems. Prof. Wetzstein is a Fellow of Optica and the recipient of numerous awards, including an NSF CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, an ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), an SPIE Early Career Achievement Award, an Electronic Imaging Scientist of the Year Award, an Alain Fournier Ph.D. Dissertation Award as well as many Best Paper and Demo Awards.

  • Cornelia Weyand

    Cornelia Weyand

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAutoimmunity
    Chronic inflammatory disease
    Metabolic control of immune function

  • Matthew Wheeler

    Matthew Wheeler

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Bernard Widrow

    Bernard Widrow

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Widrow's research focuses on adaptive signal processing, adaptive control systems, adaptive neural networks, human memory, and human-like memory for computers. Applications include signal processing, prediction, noise cancelling, adaptive arrays, control systems, and pattern recognition. Recent work is about human learning at the synaptic level.

  • Leanne Williams

    Leanne Williams

    Vincent V.C. Woo Professor, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA revolution is under way in psychiatry. We can now understand mental illness as an expression of underlying brain circuit disruptions, shaped by experience and genetics. Our lab is defining precision brain circuit biotypes for depression, anxiety and related disorders. We integrate large amounts of brain imaging, behavioral and clinical data and computational approaches. Biotypes are used in personalized intervention studies with selective drugs, neuromodulation and exploratory therapeutics.

  • Nolan Williams

    Nolan Williams

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories & Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)

    BioNolan Williams, M.D. is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab. The long-term goals of his research program are to develop innovative technologies and therapeutics capable of modulating the neural circuitry disrupted in mood disorders, OCD, and other neuropsychiatric conditions. His team has been developing neuroimaging-based approaches to precisely target therapeutic delivery and predict treatment responses to therapeutic neuromodulation and psychedelics. Dr. Williams earned his M.D. and completed his dual residencies in neurology and psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Triple board-certified in general neurology, general psychiatry, as well as behavioral neurology and neuropsychiatry, Dr. Williams brings a comprehensive background in clinical neuroscience to his role as a clinically active neuropsychiatrist. His expertise extends to the development and implementation of novel therapeutics, including devices and novel compounds, for central nervous system illnesses.
    Over the past decade, Dr. Williams’ laboratory alongside collaborators at Stanford University have pioneered multiple novel therapeutic and human neuroscience approaches. Notably, Stanford Accelerated Intelligent Neuromodulation Therapy (SAINT) is the world's first non-invasive, rapid-acting neuromodulation approach for treatment-resistant depression. SAINT received FDA Breakthrough Device Designation Status (2021) and FDA Clearance (2022) and is the first psychiatric treatment to be covered by Medicare New Technology Add-On Payment (NTAP). As of April 2024, SAINT has been reimbursed for patients suffering from severe depression within inpatient psychiatric units. The SAINT technology is being deployed both clinically and in research protocols in laboratories and hospitals worldwide. Dr. Williams also has an expertise in psychedelic medicines for neuropsychiatric illness and is the first investigator to conduct mechanistic clinical trials exploring the neurobiological effects of ibogaine.
    His research accomplishments have garnered international recognition, earning prestigious awards from the Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Disorders Consortium, One Mind Institute, Wellcome Leap Foundation, International Brain Stimulation Conference, National Institute of Mental Health (Biobehavioral Research Award for Innovative New Scientists), Society of Biological Psychiatry (A. E. Bennett Award), along with multiple awards from the Brain Behavior Research Foundation (most notably the Gerald L. Klerman Award). His work has been featured in Scientific American, The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, CBS Sunday Morning, and the TODAY Show.

  • Darrell Wilson

    Darrell Wilson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests cover a number of areas in Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes. I am PI of the Stanford Center for the NIH-funded Type-1 Diabetes TrialNet group. TrialNet conducts clinical trials directed at preventing or delaying the onset of Type 1 diabetes. I am an investigator in DirecNet, another NIH-funded study group, which is devoted to evaluating glucose sensors and the role of technology on the management of diabetes.

  • Virginia D. Winn, MD, PhD

    Virginia D. Winn, MD, PhD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Winn Laboratory seeks to understand the unique biological mechanisms of human placentation. While the placenta itself is one of the key characteristics for defining mammals, the human placenta is different from most available animal models: it is one of the most invasive placentas, and results in the formation of an organ comprised of cells from both the fetus and the mother. In addition to this fascinating chimerism, fetal cells are deeply involved in the remodeling of the maternal vasculature in order to redirect large volumes of maternal blood to the placenta to support the developing fetus. As such, the investigation of this human organ covers a large array of biological processes, and deals not only with understanding its endocrine function, but the physiologic process of immune tolerance, vascular remodeling, and cellular invasion.

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Monte Winslow

    Monte Winslow

    Associate Professor of Genetics and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory uses genome-wide methods to uncover alterations that drive cancer progression and metastasis in genetically-engineered mouse models of human cancers. We combine cell-culture based mechanistic studies with our ability to alter pathways of interest during tumor progression in vivo to better understand each step of metastatic spread and to uncover the therapeutic vulnerabilities of advanced cancer cells.

  • H.-S. Philip Wong

    H.-S. Philip Wong

    Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioH.-S. Philip Wong is the Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford University as Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2004. From 1988 to 2004, he was with the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. From 2018 to 2020, he was on leave from Stanford and was the Vice President of Corporate Research at TSMC, the largest semiconductor foundry in the world, and since 2020 remains the Chief Scientist of TSMC in a consulting, advisory role.

    He is a Fellow of the IEEE and received the IEEE Andrew S. Grove Award, the IEEE Technical Field Award to honor individuals for outstanding contributions to solid-state devices and technology, as well as the IEEE Electron Devices Society J.J. Ebers Award, the society’s highest honor to recognize outstanding technical contributions to the field of electron devices that have made a lasting impact.

    He is the founding Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance – an industrial affiliate program focused on building systems and the faculty director of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility – a shared facility for device fabrication on the Stanford campus that serves academic, industrial, and governmental researchers across the U.S. and around the globe, sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation. He is the Principal Investigator of the Microelectronics Commons California-Pacific-Northwest AI Hardware Hub, a consortium of over 40 companies and academic institutions funded by the CHIPS Act. He is a member of the US Department of Commerce Industrial Advisory Committee on microelectronics.

  • S Simon Wong

    S Simon Wong

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioWong studies the fabrication and design of high-performance integrated circuits. His work focuses on understanding and overcoming the limitations of circuit performance imposed by device and technology.

  • Wing Hung Wong

    Wing Hung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor of Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Gabrielle Wong-Parodi

    Gabrielle Wong-Parodi

    Assistant Professor of Earth System Science, Center Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Assistant Professor at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTrained as an interdisciplinary social scientist theoretically grounded in psychology and decision science, my work has two aims. First, to understand how people make decisions to address the impacts of climate change. Second, to understand how robust interventions can empower people to make decisions that serve their lives, communities, and society.

  • Joseph Woo, MD, FACS, FACC, FAHA

    Joseph Woo, MD, FACS, FACC, FAHA

    Norman E. Shumway Professor, Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    BioDr. Woo is a nationally recognized surgeon, innovator, researcher, and educator in cardiothoracic surgery.

    He chairs the Stanford Health Cardiothoracic Surgery Department. He is the Norman E. Shumway Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery and holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Bioengineering.

    Dr. Woo is a board-certified, fellowship-trained heart surgeon with an active clinical practice of more than 300 pump cases per year. He focuses on complex mitral and aortic valve repair, thoracic aortic surgery, cardiopulmonary transplantation, and minimally invasive surgery.

    He has advanced these fields by developing innovative surgical procedures. He serves as principal investigator on two studies funded by National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants. One explores stem cells, angiogenesis, tissue engineering, and valvular biomechanics. Dr. Woo has received NIH funding for this study continuously since 2004.

    He has served as primary investigator for clinical device trials. He also has been the primary investigator for translational scientific clinical trials entailing administration of stem cells during coronary artery bypass grafting and left ventricular arterial device (LVAD) implantation.

    Dr. Woo has co-authored more than 400 articles in peer-reviewed publications.
    Dr. Woo serves on the board of directors of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS). He is the president of the AATS Cardiac Surgery Biology Club. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, American College of Cardiology, and American Heart Association. He serves on the leadership committee of the American Heart Association’s Council on Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia.

    He is a member of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, International Society for Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery, International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation, International Society for Heart Research, and other professional societies.

  • Sherry M. Wren, MD, FACS, FCS(ECSA), FISS

    Sherry M. Wren, MD, FACS, FCS(ECSA), FISS

    Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research interests are primarily in global surgery,robotics,surgical oncology, especially gastrointestinal cancers.

  • Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy translational research focuses on using autologous stem cells to recreate a patient’s ocular tissues for potential transplantation. We are generating tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells to treat limbal stem cell deficiency in patients who are bilaterally blind. By applying my background in molecular and cellular biology, stem cell biology, oculoplastic surgery, I hope to make regenerative medicine a reality for those suffering from orbital and ocular disease.

  • Hsi-Yang Wu

    Hsi-Yang Wu

    Member, Bio-X

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in how the brain matures to control the bladder and external sphincter to achieve urinary continence. Using functional MRI of the brain, we are investigating if certain patterns of activity will predict which children will respond to therapy for incontinence.