School of Engineering


Showing 1-20 of 34 Results

  • Jonathan Fan

    Jonathan Fan

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOptical engineering plays a major role in imaging, communications, energy harvesting, and quantum technologies. We are exploring the next frontier of optical engineering on three fronts. The first is new materials development in the growth of crystalline plasmonic materials and assembly of nanomaterials. The second is novel methods for nanofabrication. The third is new inverse design concepts based on optimization and machine learning.

  • Shanhui Fan

    Shanhui Fan

    Director, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioFan's research involves the theory and simulations of photonic and solid-state materials and devices; photonic crystals; nano-scale photonic devices and plasmonics; quantum optics; computational electromagnetics; parallel scientific computing.

  • Charbel Farhat

    Charbel Farhat

    Vivian Church Hoff Professor of Aircraft Structures, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCharbel Farhat and his Research Group (FRG) develop mathematical models, advanced computational algorithms, and high-performance software for the design and analysis of complex systems in aerospace, marine, mechanical, and naval engineering. They contribute major advances to Simulation-Based Engineering Science. Current engineering foci in research are on the nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamics of Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) with flexible flapping wings and N+3 aircraft with High Aspect Ratio (HAR) wings, layout optimization and additive manufacturing of wing structures, supersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators for Mars landing, and the reliable automated carrier landing via model predictive control. Current theoretical and computational emphases in research are on high-performance, multi-scale modeling for the high-fidelity analysis of multi-physics problems, high-order embedded boundary methods, uncertainty quantification, probabilistic machine learning, and efficient projection-based model order reduction as well as other forms of physics-based machine learning for time-critical applications such as design, active control, and digital twins.

  • Rainer Fasching

    Rainer Fasching

    Adjunct Professor

    BioDr. Rainer Fasching is a technology executive and a consulting associate professor at Stanford University, where he teaches advanced electrochemical energy storage and sensor technologies. He has over 20 years of experience in electrochemical devices, micro fabrication technologies, and industrial product development. His work has been centered on the physics, materials and fabrication technologies of electrochemical systems such as sensors, batteries and associated materials, and fuel cells. Currently he has been leading the development of advanced energy storage technologies from concept to product at top tier startup companies. He holds over 30 issued and/or published patents and has authored more than 60 publications.

  • Kayvon Fatahalian

    Kayvon Fatahalian

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioKayvon Fatahalian is an assistant professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. His students work on visual computing systems projects, including large-scale video analytics, programming systems for video data mining, compilation techniques for optimizing image processing pipelines, and systems for real-time 3D graphics.

  • Ron Fedkiw

    Ron Fedkiw

    Professor of Computer Science

    BioFedkiw's research is focused on the design of new computational algorithms for a variety of applications including computational fluid dynamics, computer graphics, and biomechanics.

  • Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Dunlevie Family Professor of Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include (1) computer simulation and modeling of cardiovascular physiology with specific attention paid to congenital heart disease and its treatment, (2) the evaluation and treatment of pulmonary hypertension/pulmonary vascular diseases, and (3) development and testing of medical devices/therapies for the treatment of congenital heart disease and pulmonary vascular diseases.

  • Richard Fikes

    Richard Fikes

    Professor (Research) of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioRichard Fikes has a long and distinguished record as an innovative leader in the development of techniques for effectively representing and using knowledge in computer systems. He is best known as co-developer of the STRIPS automatic planning system, KIF (Knowledge Interchange Format), the Ontolingua ontology representation language and Web-based ontology development environment, the OKBC (Open Knowledge Base Connectivity) API for knowledge servers, and IntelliCorp's KEE system. At Stanford, he led projects focused on developing large-scale distributed repositories of computer-interpretable knowledge, collaborative development of multi-use ontologies, enabling technology for the Semantic Web, reasoning methods applicable to large-scale knowledge bases, and knowledge-based technology for intelligence analysts. He was principal investigator of major projects for multiple Federal Government agencies including the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Intelligence Community’s Advanced Research and Development Activity (ARDA).

  • Angelos Findikakis

    Angelos Findikakis

    Adjunct Professor

    BioAngelos Findikakis received his first degree in Civil Engineering in 1968 from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece. After working on water resources planning and development studies in Greece he came to Stanford for graduate studies in 1973. Since 1980 he has been working for Bechtel Corporation in San Francisco. Over the years he worked on a broad range of water studies in support of the permitting, design and construction of several industrial projects including civil infrastructure, power, mining, oil and gas, and waste storage facilities. As a Bechtel Fellow since 1998 he advises senior management on questions related to his expertise, participates in strategic planning, and helps disseminate new technical ideas and findings throughout the organization.
    His interests include water resources management and environmental flow and transport processes.

  • Chelsea Finn

    Chelsea Finn

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioChelsea Finn is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Professor Finn's research interests lie in the ability to enable robots and other agents to develop broadly intelligent behavior through learning and interaction. Her work lies at the intersection of machine learning and robotic control, including topics such as end-to-end learning of visual perception and robotic manipulation skills, deep reinforcement learning of general skills from autonomously collected experience, and meta-learning algorithms that can enable fast learning of new concepts and behaviors.
    Professor Finn received her Bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and her PhD in Computer Science at UC Berkeley. Her research has been recognized through the ACM doctoral dissertation award, an NSF graduate fellowship, a Facebook fellowship, the C.V. Ramamoorthy Distinguished Research Award, and the MIT Technology Review 35 under 35 Award, and her work has been covered by various media outlets, including the New York Times, Wired, and Bloomberg. Throughout her career, she has sought to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities within CS and AI by developing an AI outreach camp at Berkeley for underprivileged high school students, a mentoring program for underrepresented undergraduates across three universities, and leading efforts within the WiML and Berkeley WiCSE communities of women researchers.

    Website: https://ai.stanford.edu/~cbfinn

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and of Medicine (Microbiology and Immunology)

    BioMichael Fischbach is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at Stanford University, an institute scholar of Stanford ChEM-H, and the director of the Stanford Microbiome Therapies Initiative. Fischbach is a recipient of the NIH Director's Pioneer and New Innovator Awards, an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholars Award, a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, a Medical Research Award from the W.M. Keck Foundation, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease award, and a Glenn Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging. His laboratory uses a combination of genomics and chemistry to identify and characterize small molecules from microbes, with an emphasis on the human microbiome. Fischbach received his Ph.D. as a John and Fannie Hertz Foundation Fellow in chemistry from Harvard in 2007, where he studied the role of iron acquisition in bacterial pathogenesis and the biosynthesis of antibiotics. After two years as an independent fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital, Fischbach joined the faculty at UCSF, where he founded his lab before moving to Stanford in 2017. Fischbach is a co-founder and director of Federation Bio, a co-founder of Revolution Medicines, and a member of the scientific advisory board of NGM Biopharmaceuticals.

  • Martin Fischer

    Martin Fischer

    Kumagai Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioProfessor Fischer's research goals are to improve the productivity of project teams involved in designing, building, and operating facilities and to enhance the sustainability of the built environment. His work develops the theoretical foundations and applications for virtual design and construction (VDC). VDC methods support the design of a facility and its delivery process and help reduce the costs and maximize the value over its lifecycle. His research has been used by many small and large industrial government organizations around the world.

  • Ian Fisher

    Ian Fisher

    Director, Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Professor of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the study of quantum materials with unconventional magnetic & electronic ground states & phase transitions. Emphasis on design and discovery of new materials. Recent focus on use of strain as a probe of, and tuning parameter for, a variety of electronic states. Interests include unconventional superconductivity, quantum phase transitions, nematicity, multipolar order, instabilities of low-dimensional materials and quantum magnetism.

  • Sarah Fletcher

    Sarah Fletcher

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Center Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fletcher Lab aims to advance water resources management to promote resilient and equitable responses to a changing world.

  • June Flora

    June Flora

    Sr. Research Scholar

    BioJune A. Flora, PhD, is a senior research scientist at Stanford University’s Human Sciences & Technologies Advanced Research Institute (HSTAR) in the Graduate School of Education, and the Solutions Science Lab in the Stanford School of Medicine. June's research focuses on understanding the drivers of human behavior change and the potential of communication interventions. The research is solution focused on behavior change relevant to health and climate change.

    Most recently she is studying the role of energy use feedback delivered through motivationally framed online applications; the potential of children and youth delivered energy reduction interventions to motivate parent behavior change, and the effects of entertainment-education interventions to change behavior.

    June earned her Ph.D. from Arizona State University in educational psychology. She has held faculty positions at University of Utah and Stanford University.