School of Medicine


Showing 1-92 of 92 Results

  • Raya Saab

    Raya Saab

    Lindhard Family Professor of Pediatric Cancer Biology

    BioOur laboratory focuses on investigating molecular mechanisms of oncogene-induced tumorigenesis and tumor suppressor pathways, and oncogenic signaling in the pediatric solid tumor rhabdomyosarcoma. Our earlier work identified the tumor suppressors p53 and p18Ink4c as inhibitors of Cyclin D1-driven tumorigenesis in a pineoblastoma model, through senescence induction, and highlighted distinct roles for the the RB and p53 pathways in induction and maintenance of oncogene-induced senescence. We also identified CDK2 as a potential target for inducing senescence in premalignant lesions to inhibit tumor progression.
    Our current focus is on studying oncogenic signaling and tumor suppression in the childhood tumor rhabdomyosarcoma, to identify key mediators of invasion and metastasis, which is the most common cause of treatment failure clinically. We use preclinical in vitro and in vivo models, including murine and human cell lines, and mouse models of disease.
    We have recently uncovered a paracrine role for rhabdomyosarcoma-secreted exosomes in impacting biology of stromal cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma-derived exosomes carry specific miRNA cargo that imparts an invasive and migratory phenotype on normal recipient fibroblasts, and proteomic analysis revealed specific and unique pathways relevant to the two different molecular rhabdomyosarcoma subtypes that are driven by distinct oncogenic pathways. We identified that the driver oncogene in fusion-positive rhabdomyosarcoma, PAX3-FOXO1, modulates exosome cargo to promote invasion, migration, and angiogenic properties, and identified specific microRNA and protein cargo acting as effectors of PAX3-FOXO1 exosome-mediated signaling, including modulation of oxidative stress response and cell survival signaling.
    Our ongoing work is focused on interrogating specific paracrine signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms of metastatic disease progression in rhabdomyosarcoma, for potential therapeutic targeting.

  • Rebecca Saenz

    Rebecca Saenz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Immunology and Allergy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAllergy, Immunology, Bioengineering and Biodesign

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Elaine and John Chambers Professor of Pediatric Cancer and Professor of Genetics
    On Partial Leave from 04/22/2024 To 06/24/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Debbie C. Sakaguchi Sakai

    Debbie C. Sakaguchi Sakai

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical education, shared decision making, resuscitation.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Christy Sandborg

    Christy Sandborg

    Professor of Pediatrics (Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major emphasis of my work in the past 2 decades has been focused on the future of academic pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology through providing training, research opportunities and environments to nurture and challenge future pediatric rheumatologists and subspecialists. In parallel in the last decade, my scope has included to workforce and physician wellbring, patient and family centered care--and more recently, diversity, equity and inclusion, and health equity.

  • Kelly Corbett Sanders

    Kelly Corbett Sanders

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioDr. Kelly Sanders is a Stanford pediatrician and the Technical Lead of the Pandemic Response Initiative at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Institute for Global Health Sciences. She completed a Master of Science and Doctor of Medicine at the University of San Francisco, California, and pediatrics residency training at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University. Before pursuing a career as a physician, Dr. Sanders worked with the UCSF Global Health Group’s Malaria Elimination Initiative (MEI) on operational research projects with partner countries, as well as on developing communications and advocacy priorities with MEI and global partners. Previously, she worked with the UCSF Institute for Global Health Sciences, supporting the creation of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and the UC Global Health Institute. In addition to her work at UCSF, Dr. Sanders practices clinically as a pediatrician at Stanford University, Palo Alto Medical Foundation and Santa Clara Valley Medical Center.

  • Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH

    Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH

    Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics), of Health Policy and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI conduct interdisciplinary research to understand literacy as potentially modifiable lens for addressing maternal and child health disparities from birth through early adulthood. Applying mixed methods approaches (health-services, epidemiology, ethnography), I have been principal investigator on extramurally-funded research projects (NIH, PCORI, FDA) that aim to examine "natural experiments" in policy and/or to design, implement and test novel system-level interventions.

  • Meera N. Sankar

    Meera N. Sankar

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPDA in premature infants
    Transcutaneous bilirubin use in the NICU Setting

  • Chethan Sarabu

    Chethan Sarabu

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioChethan Sarabu, MD trained in landscape architecture, pediatrics, and clinical informatics builds anastomoses across these fields to design healthier environments and systems. He is a clinical assistant professor of Pediatrics at Stanford Medicine, Director of Clinical Informatics at Sharecare. Across these roles, he works on designing and implementing a wide array of innovations ranging from patient portals, EHR transformation, virtual clinical trials, and A.I. driven digital biomarkers, to health information policy initiatives all through a lens of health equity and patient privacy.

    He takes care of patients in a community based academic general pediatrics practice at the Gardner Packard Clinic, a Federally Qualified Health Center, where he has also assisted with EHR implementation and transition. He cares deeply on involving children in their own care and strongly focused on protecting the privacy and confidentiality of adolescents in an increasingly digital healthcare system. He helped to form and co-chair the national workgroup, Shift which has been working to promote equitable interoperability.

    Drawing on his background in landscape architecture, Chethan implements and researches nature based health solutions in collaboration with the Stanford Natural Capital Project. Finally, further exploring the role of environment and human health, he is shaping the emergent field of climate health informatics.

  • Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clea Sarnquist, DrPH, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr. Sarnquist focuses on applied teaching and research on the development, implementation and evaluation of interventions to decrease gender-based violence and prevent HIV infection, especially among adolescents and children. She is particularly interested in rights-based approaches that tackle the complex interplay of factors that lead to poor health for many children and families. All of her work is applied, with direct links health practice and policy, and usually performed in conjunction with non-governmental organization and government partners. She works both globally and in the U.S., with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. She is also a medical educator, directing the scholarly concentrations program of the pediatric residency at Stanford, and co-directing the global health concentration for residents

  • Andrew Saunders

    Andrew Saunders

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Saunders (he/him) is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics, and the medical director of the Pediatric Hospitalist Program at SHC Tri-Valley. His academic interests include diversity, equity, and inclusion in medicine; LGBTQIA+ health; ethics in technology; global health; medical education; public health; and physician wellness.

  • Michael Scahill

    Michael Scahill

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioOn a trip to Mozambique while in med school here at Stanford, I saw the power of market interventions to improve population health. In Pediatric Leadership for the Underserved residency at UCSF, I helped Jacaranda Health establish their pediatric clinic in Nairobi. Now, I split my time between the Stanford NICU and Virta, where I direct the digitally delivered diabetes reversal clinic.

  • David Scheinker

    David Scheinker

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioDavid Scheinker is the Executive Director of Systems Design and Collaborative Research at the Stanford Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. He is the Founder and Director of SURF Stanford Medicine, a group that brings together students and faculty from the university with physicians, nurses, and administrators from the hospitals. SURF has implemented and published dozens of projects demonstrating improvements to the quality and efficiency of care. His areas of focus include clinical care delivery, technical improvements to hospital operations, sensor-based and algorithm-enabled telemedicine, and the socioeconomic factors that shape healthcare cost and quality.

    Before coming to Stanford, he was a Joint Research Fellow at The MIT Sloan School of Management and Massachusetts General Hospital. He received a PhD in theoretical math from The University of California San Diego under Jim Agler. He advises Carta Healthcare, a healthcare analytics company started by former students.

  • Alan Schroeder

    Alan Schroeder

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Schroeder is the associate chief for research in the division of pediatric hospital medicine at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and a clinical professor in the division of hospital medicine and the division of critical care. His research interests focus on identifying areas where we can “safely do less” in healthcare, striving to ensure that children get the healthcare that they need while avoiding excessive tests and treatments that only cause harm. Dr. Schroeder is currently involved in multiple projects involving common conditions and interventions in pediatrics. He serves as the Stanford PI for PEDSNet and is an Associate Editor for the journal Hospital Pediatrics. At Stanford he co-leads the residency clinical research scholarly concentration and the faculty Clinical Research Peer Scholarship Community. Dr. Schroeder provides clinical care for children in the PICU and the pediatric ward.

  • Liora Schultz

    Liora Schultz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioI am currently postdoctoral research fellow pursuing immunotherapy research in the oncology department at Stanford University. My clinical training as a pediatric hematology oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center highlighted the desperate need for novel therapeutic options for a subtype of aggressive pediatric leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Despite our best standard of care for AML, long term survival rates range from 50-60% with an unacceptably high relapse rate of 40%. The urgent need for novel treatments inspired me to pursue a research project in adoptive immunotherapy, genetically modifying Tcells to express artificial T cell receptors, termed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), that target AML specific antigens. In parallel to my clinical training, I constructed an AML specific CAR and demonstrated its ability to redirect T cell function mediating eradication of AML cells. As the field of CAR therapy rapidly advances, novel methods to optimize this therapeutic modality are imperative. To this end, supported by research demonstrating superior antitumor function of naïve derived effector T cells compared to central memory derived effector T cells, I am investigating whether preferential modification of naïve T cells to express CARs will generate a T cell subpopulation with increased efficacy. Consolidating my clinical and research experiences within highly academic institutes allows me to synthesize my pursuit of scientific rigor and commitment to the field of oncology, with a mission to achieve productive research and translatable results.

  • Christopher Thomas Scott, PhD

    Christopher Thomas Scott, PhD

    Sr Research Scholar, Pediatrics - Center for Biomedical Ethics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the political, legal, ethical and economic impacts of stem cell research. Topics include: embryonic and adult stem cell research and clinical trials, stem cell banking, human-animal chimeras; cell and gamete donation; international perspectives of bioethics; global economic impacts; national and state regulatory policy, stem cell entrepreneurship, intellectual property and offshore stem cell transplants.

  • Talal Seddik

    Talal Seddik

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTalal Seddik is a member of the Collaborative Antiviral Study Group. He is the key site investigator at the Stanford site for the following multicenter studies:

    1) DMID 19-0026 Enterovirus Study
    Neonatal Enterovirus and Human Parechovirus Viral Sepsis: Natural History and Predictors of Morbidity and Mortality

    This study will be the first large, multi-state prospective assessment of the viral causes of neonatal sepsis conducted. The main reason for this research study is to get a better understanding of what causes neonatal viral sepsis and to assess the impact of the infection on the babies’ health. Viruses called enterovirus (EV) or human parechovirus (HPeV) are very common in the population and can cause neonatal viral sepsis. By gaining a better understanding of the condition, we hope this information can be used to guide diagnosis and treatment of babies with neonatal viral sepsis in the future.

    This study is actively enrolling subjects

    2) DMID 19-0005 Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) Study
    A Prospective Study of Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) to Define Natural History, Risk Factors and Pathogenetic Mechanisms

    Patients with suspected AFM (onset of flaccid limb weakness within the previous 30 days) are eligible to enroll in the study. Investigators will assess participants at four-time points within the first month of enrollment and will ask participants to return for additional follow up visits at 3 months, 7 months and 1 year. Neurologic improvements will be tracked over time, and samples will be collected and stored in a biorepository for use in future research studies. Household contacts, such as siblings, will be eligible to participate in the study as a control or comparison group.

    This study is actively enrolling subjects.

  • Ami J. Shah

    Ami J. Shah

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    BioI joined Stanford University in 2015 as a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology/ Oncology, Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine, having completed my training in Pediatric Hematology/ Oncology at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. My areas of clinical expertise have been in the areas of transplantation for immune deficiencies and immune reconstitution post HSCT. I have been actively involved with the care and treatment of children with primary immune deficiencies and work with the Primary Immune Deficiencies Consortium (PIDTC). I am very interested in cellular therapies as a treatment modality for rare genetic diseases. I currently am the PI for several gene therapy trials at Stanford for various disorders including cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (cALD), Sickle Cell Anemia, Thalassemia and Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency. My other main areas of research have been in studying the late effects of patients following stem cell transplantation, in specific the neurocognitive function post HSCT. I have been involved with several national committees addressing the late effects of HSCT within the ASBMT and COG.

    In addition to my research work in stem cell transplantation, I have been actively involved with mentorship and graduate medical education. I am currently the Program Director for the Hematology/ Oncology Fellowship and serve as a mentor through the Pediatric Mentoring Group.

  • Mona D. Shah, MD, MBA

    Mona D. Shah, MD, MBA

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioDr. Mona Shah is a pediatric hematologist-oncologist, who earned her MD degree at the University of Maryland in 2001. She completed both her categorical pediatrics and global health residencies in 2004, followed by a pediatric hematology-oncology fellowship in 2007. She earned her MS in Clinical Investigation as part of the Clinical Scientist Training Program (CSTP) at Baylor College of Medicine in 2011, and more recently, completed an Executive MBA at Rice University Jones School of Business in 2018.

    Dr. Shah was an Associate Professor at Baylor College of Medicine (2007 - 2020) in both Pediatrics and Medicine, local site PI on a number of pediatric hemostasis/thrombosis clinical trials, and spent 10 years as an Associate Medical Director of Clinical Operations, Quality, and Safety at Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX.

    Dr. Shah joined Genentech (a Member of the Roche Group)’s Rare Blood Disorders Franchise (Product Development - Oncology-Hematology) in February 2020, quickly advancing to Lead Medical Director, where she served as Medical Monitor for 2 Phase III Clinical Trials (crovalimab in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, aHUS). She was also engaged with the Renal Franchise (I2O) in developing crovalimab in Lupus Nephritis (Phase I & II Clinical Trials in development), and with Human Factors/Pediatric Formulations Working Group on autoinjector devices and oral formulations.

    After completing a rotation in Early Development Safety (EDS), she was promoted to Senior Medical Safety Director in Late Stage Product Development, and was appointed Safety Strategy Lead for giredestrant in early and metastatic breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancer global clinical trials. She has experience in innovative study designs (adaptive/multi-drug), with FDA/EMA pediatric investigational plans, and health authority interactions. In June 2023, she was appointed Pediatric Safety Lead, in collaboration with the iPODD Team, supporting safety for pediatric indications and devices, and serves as the Co-Chair of the Pediatric Safety Expert Group.

    Dr. Shah has kept and completed a bucket list since she was 7 years old (keeps growing): Running wild bouldering/rock climbing as a child in the Shenandoah/Blue Ridge Mountains, swimming with dolphins/piranhas in the Amazon, climbing inside a volcano caldera in Iceland, snorkeling the Great Barrier Reef ... have passport/will travel!

    Since July 2022, she has joined Stanford University School of Medicine, as an Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology-Oncology, where she enjoys teaching MSII students, and at the bedside in the Lucille Packard Bass Center Hematology Clinic. Dr. Shah enjoys free time in her new home base near San Francisco, where she hosts her visiting parents, friends, and extended family.

  • Sejal Shah

    Sejal Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary research interest is evaluating whether vitamin D supplementation can positively affect consequences of the metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adolescents. Other research interests include evaluating the efficacy and biochemical profiles of various types of estrogen replacement in adolescent females.

  • Paul Sharek MD, MPH

    Paul Sharek MD, MPH

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hospital Medicine) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests centered on hospital based quality of care improvement, and in particular pediatric patient safety. Areas of recent interest include developing practical tools to more accurately identify adverse medical events and to establish national rates of these adverse events. Additional areas of interest focus on developing the processes and systems to decrease the frequency of adverse drug events and adverse medical events at Children's hospitals in North America

  • Gary M. Shaw

    Gary M. Shaw

    NICU Nurses Professor and Professor (Research), by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include 1) epidemiology of birth defects, 2) gene-environment approaches to perinatal outcomes, and 3) nutrition and reproductive outcomes.

  • Richard J. Shaw, M.D.

    Richard J. Shaw, M.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child & Adolescent Psychiatry) &, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPsychological issues in medically ill children.
    Medical posttraumatic stress disorder.
    Treatment adherence.
    Transplant psychiatry.
    Pediatric oncology.
    Forensic psychiatry.

  • Xinshu She

    Xinshu She

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current interests include global mental health promotion in underserved pediatric populations, including refugee health in US-Mexico borders, minority mental health in the US, and parental mental health in low-middle-income countries. I am also interested in physician wellness and Diversity and Inclusion.

  • Hiroyuki Shimada

    Hiroyuki Shimada

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics

    BioHiroyuki Shimada, MD, PhD, FRCPA (Hon), is Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center. He was born in Tokyo, Japan, and completed MD (1973) and PhD (1982) at the Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan, and also completed his pathology training at the Children's Hospital (now the Nationwide Children’s Hospital) and the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA (1988). Before moving to the Stanford University in 2019, he was Professor of Pathology (Clinical Scholar) at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and working at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.
    Dr. Shimada was Chair of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (1999-2017) and the founder of the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC). As Director of the COG (Children’s Oncology Group) Neuroblastoma Pathology Reference Laboratory (since 2001), he has been actively reviewing pathology samples of ~700 neuroblastoma cases per year from United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Pathology review results according to the INPC have been providing critical information for patient stratification and protocol assignment in the COG international neuroblastoma clinical trials.

  • Andrew Young Shin

    Andrew Young Shin

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSURF PROGRAM
    The SURF program is an innovative collaboration between LPCH, Stanford University Hospital and the Stanford School of Engineering. The program has focused on improving quality and safety of patient care, improving hospital operations and promoting clinical effectiveness utilizing contemporary technologies such as machine learning, mathematical optimization, simulation and a variety of statistical, probabilistic and computational tools. The program has 2 independent funding mechanism to primarily improve patient care/hospital operations and improve academics for faculty within the department of Pediatrics at LPCH.

    https://surf.stanford.edu/


    CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS
    The Clinical Effectiveness (CE) Program is a funded program that aims to understand and improve unnecessary variation in healthcare delivery in order to optimize quality of care and reduce wasteful expenditures. The CE program has developed innovative programs such as Target Based Care, an award-winning intervention to reduce variation in hospital length of stay and currently a multi-center trial involving more than 20 hospitals in North America. In 2016, the CE program included the first CE fellowship program in a pediatric training program with 3 cycles of graduates. The CE program is supported by LPCH and a philanthropic gift by Susan Choe and Thomas Tobiason.

  • Ann Shue, MD

    Ann Shue, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology
    Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics

    Bio**Dr. Shue is taking new patients for glaucoma, cataracts, and adult strabismus.**

    Ann Shue, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she specializes in glaucoma, pediatric ophthalmology, and adult strabismus, a unique combination of subspecializations practiced by few surgeons worldwide. She is a board-certified ophthalmologist who completed fellowships in glaucoma at Yale University and pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus at Duke University. She practices at the Stanford Byers Eye Institute and the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

    Dr. Shue loves seeing patients of all ages with eye problems big or small, including glaucoma due to any reason, glaucoma suspicion, family history of glaucoma, cataracts, strabismus (eye misalignment) or double vision from any cause, including after eye surgeries. She completed her ophthalmology residency at the University of Pittsburgh and an internal medicine internship at UCSF Fresno. She holds a medical degree from University of California, Irvine and an undergraduate degree in biology from Yale University.

    Dr. Shue is a member of the American Glaucoma Society, the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, and the UK Paediatric Glaucoma Society. She is active in presenting at regional and national conferences. She is the author of several journal articles and recently wrote two textbook chapters on pediatric glaucoma and pediatric glaucoma surgery.

  • Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Regulation of Intestinal Development and Maturation. We study transcriptional mechanisms regulating the spatial and temporal restriction of intestine-specific gene expression during gut development. Our approach is to characterize the function of gene-specific DNA cis elements and interacting nuclear proteins in cell culture and in transgenic animals. The goal is to relate the gene-specific control mechanisms to the broader pathways specifying acquisition of gut phenotypes.

  • Douglas Sidell, MD

    Douglas Sidell, MD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Sidell's clinical interests include the management of children with voice and swallowing disorders, and congenital or acquired airway abnormalities. Examples of ongoing or upcoming prospective trials include an investigation into the utility of acid suppression in children with laryngomalacia, the management of vocal cord paralysis following cardiac surgery, and the management of type 1 laryngeal clefts in children.

  • Dawn H. Siegel, MD

    Dawn H. Siegel, MD

    Clinical Professor, Dermatology
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm dedicated to connecting patients with clinical research trials and contributing to research on specific skin conditions particularly hemangiomas, birthmarks, and PHACE syndrome. My research also aims to develop solutions to health disparities through improved access to pediatric dermatologists and treatments.

  • Norman H. Silverman

    Norman H. Silverman

    Honorary Faculty Emeritus, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests center around cardiac ultrasound. I am currently working on several areas in the development of human cardiac ultrasound.

    These are fetal cardiac ultrasound. intraoperative and transesophageal ultrasound imaging in children, imaging potiential for ultrasound two and three dimensional modalities in children with congenital heart disease

  • Deepti Sinha

    Deepti Sinha

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    BioDr. Sinha is board certified in Pediatrics and Sleep Medicine. She completed medical school in Australia and general pediatric training in Australia and USA at Royal Children’s Hospital and University of Chicago at Illinois. Her sleep medicine fellowship was completed at Stanford Hospital. She enjoys working with children of all ages. She manages both behavioral and physiological sleep concerns.

  • Sidhartha Sinha

    Sidhartha Sinha

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThere are two primary and overlapping emphases of my research, both of which are driven and united by needs-based innovation and translational potential:

    (1) Understanding the microenvironment of the inflamed versus normal gut in order to identify better therapeutic targets for people with immune-¬mediated GI disorders. Here, our investigations include understanding the influence and interactions of pharmacologic and dietary interventions on gut microbiome/metabolomic changes and the host immune response. In the context of providing patients with new understanding and solutions for their disease, I have led and advised on the design of both pilot and large clinical trials (including new FDA approved therapies) for anti-inflammatory therapies;

    (2) Applying novel approaches and technologies (including natural language processing, computer vision, and reinforcement learning) to identify and address unmet clinical needs. In this area we have ongoing and published efforts in my lab to validate and develop solutions to pressing clinical needs. We have developed/led new drug delivery technologies with a multidisciplinary team that have shown strong potential in ongoing human IBD clinical trials. My lab has utilized both supervised and unsupervised approaches to analyze social media discourse and unstructured data sets for identifying patient needs that are rarely addressed in clinical settings. We have gained insights into patient perceptions around preventative health interventions, such as health screening and diet, including the dearth of evidence-based dietary recommendations to treat IBD (despite strong patient desire for solutions in this domain).

  • Maggi Smeal MD

    Maggi Smeal MD

    Clinical Instructor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioMaggi Smeal MD does her clinical work at Gardner Packard Children's Health Care supervising Stanford residents and medical students in urgent care. She is co-director of the Families at the Border Program in Stanford's Center for Innovation in Global Health. Her humanitarian aid work is focused on helping asylum-seeking families in Tijuana who access care at the Refugee Health Alliance clinics ( RHA) . She leads a team of pediatricians, medical students, undergraduate students and community members to support RHA. The team has taught Helping Babies Breathe, a low-resource neonatal resuscitation program, to midwives in Tijuana. She has also brought a Pediatric Emergency Readiness course to providers at RHA clinics and supports the clinic through telemedicine. She is also a member of RHA's pediatric committee. Her global health work has also involved humanitarian aid in the Philippines and Peru. Locally she has worked on mobile health vans to support migrant farm workers and provided educational sessions for clients at LifeMoves Homeless Shelters. Her team's work with Families at the Border has been presented at the Consortium of Universities for Global Health National Conference and the group was awarded the Untold Global Health Story of 2020.

  • Stephanie Melissa Smith

    Stephanie Melissa Smith

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am involved with clinical research related to cancer survivorship, with a particular focus on late effects of childhood cancer treatments and community partnerships to improve health equity for adolescent/young adult cancer survivors in under-resourced settings.

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Alex and Susie Algard Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goals of the Sonnenburg Lab research program are to (i) elucidate the basic mechanisms that underlie dynamics within the gut microbiota and (ii) devise and implement strategies to prevent and treat disease in humans via the gut microbiota. We investigate the principles that govern gut microbial community function and interaction with the host using a broad range of experimental approaches including studies of microbiomes in diverse human cohorts.

  • Diane Stafford

    Diane Stafford

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    BioDr. Stafford specializes in Pediatric Endocrinology with special interest in disorders of puberty and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Her research interests include in medical education curriculum development, faculty development and endocrine dysfunction in PWS.

  • Katherine Steffen

    Katherine Steffen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on using dissemination and implementation science tools to study and enhance care provided to patients in the pediatric ICU. I have a background in human factors research and in implementation science and am also interested in clinical effectiveness and outcomes in the PICU.

  • Lea Steffes

    Lea Steffes

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    BioDr. Steffes, a Wisconsin native, completed medical school and pediatric residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She then moved to the Bay Area and completed her clinical fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine at Stanford University in 2020. Additionally, Dr. Steffes received further post-doctoral training in the laboratories of Dr. Maya Kumar and Dr. David Cornfield, studying the cellular and molecular mechanism driving pulmonary vascular disease. In addition to her role as an Instructor in Pediatrics in the division of Pulmonary Medicine, Dr. Steffes is also completing an advanced clinical fellowship in Pulmonary Hypertension at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. Her clinical work consists of caring for patients with pediatric pulmonary and pulmonary vascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, interstitial lung disease, respiratory failure, chronic cough and asthma. Her research is focused on the vascular changes seen in pulmonary hypertension, more specifically understanding the cellular characteristics of occlusive neointimal lesions, the abnormal cells that block pulmonary blood flow in pulmonary hypertension. In her most recent work, Dr. Steffes identified a subset of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells that are the cell of origin for the pathologic neointimal cells and a specific signaling pathway, that when blocked, inhibits the formation of neointimal lesions.

    Dr. Steffes is currently employing advanced single cell sequencing technologies to further understand neointimal cells with the ultimate goal identifying new therapies for pulmonary hypertension, a fatal disease with no known cure.

  • Lawrence Steinman, MD

    Lawrence Steinman, MD

    George A. Zimmermann Professor and Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory is dedicated to understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, particularly multiple sclerosis. We have developed several new therapies for autoimmunity, including some in Phase 2 clinical trials, as well as one approved drug, natalizumab. We have developed microarray technology for detecting autoantibodies to myelin proteins and lipids. We employ a diverse range of molecular and celluar approaches to trying to understand multiple sclerosis.

  • Lindsay Stevens

    Lindsay Stevens

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Informatics is the scientific field concerned with the application of information technology to the delivery of healthcare services. In my role as a physician informaticist, I work with a team to evaluate the best ways to implement and optimize health information technology to benefit the patients we serve at Stanford Children's Health. Specific areas of focus include: improving EHR education for clinicians, merging Health IT with medical education, and innovating in digital health.

  • David Stevenson

    David Stevenson

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on disorders of the RAS/MAPK pathway (eg. NF1, Noonan, CFC, and Costello syndrome). I am working on understanding the impact of RAS signaling on the musculoskeletal system. I use genomic approaches to identify somatic events and modifiers in the RASopathies. I am also involved in identifying outcome measures for use in clinical trials for the associated orthopedic manifestations. Other areas of research involve vascular anomalies, Prader-Willi syndrome, and hypophosphatasia.

  • David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    David K. Stevenson, M.D.

    Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics, Senior Associate Dean, Maternal and Child Health and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on the study of the ontogeny and control of heme catabolism and bilirubin production in the developing neonate. A better understanding of the role of increased bilirubin production in neonatal jaundice and the prevention of hemolytic jaundice has remained an overall objective of our program. We are also study the causes of preterm birth and ways to prevent it.

  • Terrell Stevenson

    Terrell Stevenson

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Terrell Stevenson specializes in the care of hospitalized children. She works both at Stanford and Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. She has particular interests in community pediatric hospital medicine (including care of well babies and coverage of NICU/PICU patients), advocacy, the hospitalist's role in comfort care, and teaching medical trainees.

  • Sarah Streett

    Sarah Streett

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. Sarah Streett is a Clinical Professor of Medicine, the Director of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Education at Stanford, and she is passionate about taking care of people with IBD. She is a national expert in treating complex IBD and initiated a multi-disciplinary approach to care with colorectal surgery, pediatrics, and nutrition. In 2018 she received the Champion of Hope Award from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation and serves on their National Scientific Advisory Committee. Her interests focus on fertility and pregnancy in people with IBD, developing precision approaches to IBD therapy, and the role that the microbiome and diet play in its pathogenesis. She is a primary investigator of the Stanford IBD Registry and has research projects focused on optimizing clinical outcomes in IBD, the role of the microbiota and diet in IBD and pregnancy, and applying new technologies to individualizing therapy for IBD. She is also the primary investigator on multiple industry-sponsored IBD trials.

    Teaching is a top priority for Dr. Streett who feels that mentoring fellows in the development of their careers is a privilege. She has held many national leadership roles in the American Gastroenterological Association, where she has been Chair of the Practice Management and Economics Committee, and currently serves on the Government Affairs Committee. She also an appointed member of the Gastrointestinal Drug Advisory Committee at the FDA. She has represented the interests of gastroenterologists and their patients on Capitol Hill numerous times. Dr. Streett believes strongly in a collaborative approach to give patients personalized care based on the latest therapies for the treatment of IBD and is committed to mentoring the next generation of experts in the field.

  • Elizabeth Stuart

    Elizabeth Stuart

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary professional interests include teaching and curriculum design around patient-centered and cross-cultural communication, clinical reasoning, and performance assessment. My clinical teaching emphasizes role modeling and reflection on doctor-patient interactions and clinical decision-making.

  • Felice Su

    Felice Su

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical pharmacology research is focused on investigating the impact of dynamic organ function on drug disposition and designing dosing strategies based on mathematical models that account for these changes in order to optimize safe medication administration in critically ill children.

    Research through the REVIVE Initiative for Resuscitation Excellence investigates the quality of resuscitation during cardiopulmonary arrest. Areas of focus include early identification during the no-flow state prior to CPR initiation and quality of CPR simulation education.

  • Shazeen Suleman

    Shazeen Suleman

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use community-engaged methods to co-design, implement and evaluate interventions to improve access to care and reduce health disparities for migrant children, especially those with neuro-developmental and special healthcare needs

  • Vivien Kon-Ea Sun

    Vivien Kon-Ea Sun

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    BioVivien Sun is a pediatric hospitalist and Clinical Associate Professor within Stanford’s Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine. She practices at California Pacific Medical Center and Stanford Healthcare Tri-Valley. Vivien’s interests include advocacy, medical education, and professional development.

  • Philip Sunshine

    Philip Sunshine

    Professor of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary interests are in the area of neonatal nutrition and developmental gastroenterology. The use of parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants, and the introduction of early enteral feeding to stimulate gastrointestinal maturation are my specific areas of investigative endeavors.

  • Ali Bin Syed

    Ali Bin Syed

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Pediatric Radiology

    BioDr. Syed is a member of the divisions of Pediatric Radiology and Body MRI and serves as the Director of MRI for Stanford Medicine Children's Health. His clinical interests include MR imaging of pediatric and adult hepatobiliary disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, gynecologic pathology, and congenital heart disease. He is also an active researcher, collaborating with fellow engineers and scientists at Stanford to translate technical innovations in MRI into improved patient care. His recent work focuses on translation of machine learning techniques for rapid, robust MRI in children and adults.