School of Medicine


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  • Steven Adelsheim

    Steven Adelsheim

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioSteven Adelsheim, MD is a child/adolescent and adult psychiatrist who works to support community behavioral health partnerships locally, regionally, at the state level and nationally. He is the Director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Adelsheim has partnered in developing statewide mental health policy and systems, including those focused on school mental health, telebehavioral health, tribal behavioral health programs, and suicide prevention. For many years Dr. Adelsheim has been developing and implementing early detection/intervention programs for young people in school-based and primary care settings, including programs for depression, anxiety, prodromal symptoms of psychosis, and first episodes of psychosis. Dr. Adelsheim is also involved in the implementation of integrated behavioral health care models in primary care settings as well as the use of media to decrease stigma surrounding mental health issues. He is currently leading the US effort to implement the headspace model of mental health early intervention for young people ages 12-25 based in Australia. Dr. Adelsheim also leads the national clinical network for early psychosis programs called PEPPNET.

  • Rania Awaad, MD

    Rania Awaad, MD

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs the Director of the Muslims and Mental Health Lab, Dr. Awaad is dedicated to creating an academic home for the study of mental health as it relates to the Islamic faith and Muslim populations. The lab aims to provide the intellectual resources to clinicians, researchers, trainees, educators, community and religious leaders working with or studying Muslims.

  • Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD, ABPP, FT

    Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD, ABPP, FT

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioI am an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and a licensed clinical psychologist in the Stanford University School of Medicine. I am a suicidologist, with subspecialty expertise in clinical trials, epidemiology, and suicide prevention best practices. I have joint specialty in behavioral sleep medicine, treatment development, and thanatology. I am Founding Director of The Stanford Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory, and Co-Chair a number of initiatives to support multidisciplinary efforts in suicide prevention. Our program utilizes cognitive, biological (e.g., fMRI), and behavioral testing paradigms, with an emphasis on translational therapeutics across the lifespan. Our mission is to identify novel therapeutics, including seminal work to establish the subfield of sleep and suicide prevention. A special focus is the development of rapid-action, low-risk interventions for the prevention of suicide. Our mission is to evaluate transdiagnostic risk factors and biomarkers underlying treatment response that may inform etiology, reduce stigma, and advance innovation. Advocating for its utility as a visible, yet non-stigmatizing warning sign of suicide—our earliest work delineated sleep as a risk factor for suicidal behaviors. Funded by NIH and DOD, we subsequently conducted the first suicide prevention clinical trials, testing efficacy of a rapid-action (6 h) insomnia treatment for suicidal behaviors. These use a mechanisms focus to identify central disease processes (eg, underlying neural circuitry, behavioral factors) for anti-suicidal response. An overarching aim is to harness new technologies to aid risk prediction, precision medicine, and intervention opportunity. We are committed to improving national training practices (e.g., national needs-assessment of medical training parameters; AI for suicide prevention), and lead hospital best practices for safety in screening, triage, and postvention.

    Regarding translation to policy, I have served as a content expert for nationally-directed health initiatives with NIH, VA, DOD, DARPA, SAMHSA, CDC, and The White House. I recently led development of the CA 2020-25 Statewide Strategy for Suicide Prevention, following invited testimony (CA State Assembly) and a commissioned Policy Brief on suicide prevention best practices. Advisory and advocacy work centers on how research guides public health policy and implementation. I am especially committed to initiatives promising impact to suicide prevention on a broad scale, including universal strategies for lethal means restriction and real-time surveillance of suicidal behaviors. To this end, I have been honored to serve as a content expert to The White House Office of Science and Technology for initiatives focused on technology innovation and led advisory work promoting suicide deterrent systems for private organizations and public sites, such as the Golden Gate Bridge. I have consulted for technology companies, as well as private industry and healthcare partners.

    Inspired by maternity leaves coinciding with the above work, I have a separate research line examining organizational development, inclusive practices, sleep and employee wellness. This addresses disparate impact of institutional and federal medical leave practices on recruitment and retention of women. Our program focuses on cost-effective policy for diversity training and reduced attrition of women in medicine, law, STEM and technology fields. As such, I am dedicated to spearheading development of a Stanford Center for Policy, Inclusive Practices, and Equity Education.

    To donate or partner with us, please contact Deborah Stinchfield (Stanford Medical Center Development) medicalgiving@stanford.edu or please contact us directly.

  • Jessica Yelena Breland

    Jessica Yelena Breland

    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated), Psych/General Psychiatry and Psychology (Adult)
    Staff, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioJessica Breland, MS, PhD is a licensed psychologist and a Core Investigator at the Center for Innovation to Implementation in the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Dr. Breland received her PhD in psychology from Rutgers and completed her clinical internship at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX.

    Her work focuses on using quantitative and qualitative methods to: 1) assess outcomes related to the implementation of evidenced-based treatments, especially through controlled trials in novel settings (e.g., primary care) or with novel methods (e.g., apps); 2) identify and reduce racial and ethnic disparities in health; and 3) enhance care for patients with chronic conditions, such as obesity or diabetes.

  • Christiane Brems, PhD, ABPP, ERYT500, C-IAYT

    Christiane Brems, PhD, ABPP, ERYT500, C-IAYT

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioChristiane Brems, PhD, ABPP, RYT-500, C-IAYT, is the Founding Director of YogaX, a Special Initiative in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Oklahoma State University in 1987. Dr. Brems is licensed as a psychologist in several US states and board-certified as a clinical psychologist by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP). She is a registered yoga teacher (E-RYT500) and certified C-IAYT yoga therapist. She is also certified in Interactive Guided Imagery.

    She began her career in academia at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. She then served on faculty at the University of Alaska Anchorage for 23 years, where she held a variety of leadership positions, including as (Co-Founding) Director of the Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, (Co-Founding) Director of the PhD Program in Clinical-Community Psychology, and Interim Vice Provost for Research and Dean of the Graduate School. Most recently, she served for nearly six years as Dean and Professor of the School of Graduate Psychology (SGP) at Pacific University Oregon.

    Dr. Brems has worked for decades as an applied researcher and clinical practitioner with particular interests in health promotion, rural healthcare delivery, and all things yoga. Her work has been funded by grants and contracts from the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration, and local and State of Alaska funding sources. She has shared her work extensively in over 120 peer-reviewed journal articles, 100s of technical reports, and several books, including the Comprehensive Guide to Child Psychotherapy (now in its 4th edition), Dealing with Challenges in Psychotherapy and Counseling, Basic Skills in Counseling and Psychotherapy, and others. Dr. Brems is committed to excellence in and integration of clinical services, teaching, consultation, and research.

    Dr. Brems has integrated yoga, mindfulness, complementary interventions, and self-care strategies in her work as a consultant, author, dean, teacher, researcher, mentor, supervisor, colleague, and service provider. She values these practices as crucial aspects of day-to-day professional and personal life and seeks to enhance access to them for all who can benefit.

  • Eve Carlson

    Eve Carlson

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioEve Carlson is a Clinical Professor who focuses on fostering mental health after traumatic stress. She is a clinical psychologist and a researcher with the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder’s Dissemination and Training Division. Her primary interests are in measurement development and recovery after traumatic stress. She collaborates with faculty in Surgery (David Spain) and Medicine (Lisa Shieh) to study mental health of patients hospitalized after sudden, severe illness or injury, racial/ethnic disparities in traumatic stress risks and responses, screening for risk of mental health problems, and preventive mental health care. As PIs of a multi-center study funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, Dr. Carlson and Dr. Spain and their collaborators have developed and validated a mental health risk screen for hospital patients admitted after sudden, severe illness or injury. Data from patients who identify as Asian American/Pacific Islander, Black, Latinx, Multiracial, and White were analyzed to select screen items, and the screen accurately predicts later mental health outcomes within these ethnic/racial groups. Our research has also found disparities across ethnic/racial groups in several traumatic stress risk factors and mental health responses. Dr. Carlson is Co-PI with Dr. Shieh of a study funded by Stanford RISE comparing mental health recovery in Latinx and non-Latinx COVID-19 patients to recovery in patients hospitalized with other sudden, severe illness.

  • Steven Chan, MD MBA

    Steven Chan, MD MBA

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Steven Chan is a Faculty Co-Director at Stanford Frontier Technology Lab, a member of Stanford Psychiatry’s TechHub Leadership Committee, faculty with the Stanford Addiction Medicine Fellowship, and a clinical educator caring for patients with substance use disorders (SUD) and addictions.

    Dr. Chan is a clinical informaticist, addiction medicine physician, and psychiatrist. He is a clinical assistant professor affiliated with the Stanford University School of Medicine, and Chair of the Committee on Innovation at the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Chan is a sought-after national speaker whose ideas, thoughts, and research have been featured at Google headquarters, JAMA, Telemedicine and e-Health, JMIR (Journal of Medical Internet Research), Wired, PBS, and NPR Ideastream. He serves as Chief Technology Officer and co-founder of AsyncHealth — a University of California-backed digital mental health startup supported by Berkeley SkyDeck PAD-13 — and writes at both @stevenchanMD and @mpowerhacks.

  • Helene Chokron Garneau

    Helene Chokron Garneau

    Sr Res Scholar, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Current Role at StanfordSenior Research Scientist
    Co-Director, Center for Dissemination and Implementation At Stanford (C-DIAS)

  • Timothy Durazzo

    Timothy Durazzo

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe mission of the Durazzo BRASS lab is to better understand how the interplay between biomedical, psychological and social factors influence treatment outcome in Veterans and civilians seeking treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders. To accomplish this mission, our multidisciplinary team integrates information from advanced neuroimaging, neurocognitive assessment, psychodiagnostic and genotyping methods to identify the biopsychosocial factors associated with relapse and sustained sobriety. Veteran's Administration and Stanford funded Clinical trials are currently being conducted by the BRASS lab that evaluate repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques as novel complementary treatments to reduce the high rate of relapse experienced by individuals with alcohol and substance abuse disorders. The ultimate goal of our multidisciplinary research program is to promote the development of more effective biomedical and behavioral treatments for alcohol and substance use disorders through consideration of the brain biology, psychology and social circumstances of each individual.

  • David Eagleman

    David Eagleman

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioDavid Eagleman is a neuroscientist, bestselling author, and Guggenheim Fellow. Dr. Eagleman’s areas of research include sensory substitution, time perception, vision, and synesthesia. He also studies the intersection of neuroscience with the legal system, and in that capacity he directs the non-profit Center for Science and Law. Eagleman is the writer and presenter of The Brain, an Emmy-nominated television series on PBS and BBC. He is the author of 8 books, including Livewired, The Runaway Species, The Brain, Incognito, and Wednesday is Indigo Blue. He is also the author of a widely adopted textbook on cognitive neuroscience, Brain and Behavior. His internationally bestselling book of literary fiction, SUM, has been translated into 32 languages, turned into two operas, and named a Best Book of the Year by Barnes and Noble. Dr. Eagleman has been a TED speaker, a guest on the Colbert Report, and profiled in the New Yorker magazine. He has launched several neuroscience companies from his research, including Neosensory and BrainCheck.

  • William O Faustman

    William O Faustman

    Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Faustman received his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Mississippi and completed his internship at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. He has an active interest in training, administration, forensic practice, and clinical care in inpatient psychiatry. His research interests have focused on severe mental illness with an emphasis in areas such as cognition and clinical assessment.. He serves as a member of the Stanford IRB and coordinates the American Psychological Association accredited postdoctoral fellowship program at the VA Palo Alto. He holds Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society,

  • Howard H Fenn MD

    Howard H Fenn MD

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioCurrent CV available on request to
    hhfenn@aol.com

    CLINICAL:
    Inpatient psychiatry attending at VA HCS Palo Alto for over 30 years.
    Medical Director, Geriatric Psychiatry unit, VA HCSC Palo Alto/Menlo Park for 10 years
    Outpatient psychiatrist at Palo Alto Medical foundation/Sutter for 15 years

    CURRENT PUBLICATIONS:
    Lead Editor, Inpatient Geriatric Psychiatry, Springer, 2019

    LEGAL/FORENSIC:
    Consultation practice on legal issues and court testimony for >40 years
    Expert consultant/witness for Coleman vs. California Department of Corrections for 4 years
    Qualified Medical Examiner (QME) for Division of Worker's Compensation for 15 years
    Compensation and Pension Unit, VA HCS Palo Alto for 5 years

    SEMINAR LEADER:
    Psychiatric Issues in Cognitive Impairment -- Stanford/VA Alzheimer's Center (SVAAC)
    Legal Aspects of Geriatric Psychiatry (Stanford/VA Geriatric Psychiatry Fellowship
    Didactic topics on inpatient psychiatry rotation for Stanford Geriatric Psychiatry fellows

    EDUCATIONAL/ADMINISTRATIVE:
    Program Director, Stanford/VA Geriatric Psychiatry Fellowship, 3 years
    Site Director, Inpatient Psychiatry Rotation/Geriatric Medicine Fellowship --6 years

    SCHOLARSHIP:
    Lead Editor of textbook, Inpatient Geriatric Psychiatry, published by Springer in 2019.
    Slide presentations published by the American Society of Clinical Pharmacology (ASCP), editor Ira Glick, MD, entitled:
    --Pharmacological Treatment of PTSD
    --Behavioral and Psychological symptoms of Dementia
    Chapters, review articles on topics of Medication management for Major Neurocognitive Disorder with Behavioral Disturbance
    Chapter in Inpatient Geriatric Psychiatry, in On-Call Geriatric Psychiatry (2016), Springer.
    .

  • Becky Fullmer

    Becky Fullmer

    Administrative Associate 3, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    Current Role at StanfordBecky provides administrative support to Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez and the Rodriguez Lab within the School of Medicine's Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Department.

  • Ansgar Furst

    Ansgar Furst

    Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioDr. Furst is a Clinical Associate Professor (affiliated) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is a Principal Investigator and Director of the California War Related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC) Advanced Fellowship Post-Doctoral program and Associate Director of Neuroimaging. He is also a Senior Research Scientist at the Polytrauma System of Care (PSC) at VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Dr. Furst serves as Associate Editor for the journal Frontiers in Neurology and is a member of the editorial board of NEUROLOGY. His research focuses on chronic multisymptom illness, traumatic brain injury, sleep, pain and neurodegenerative diseases.

    For more information please visit:
    https://med.stanford.edu/furstlab.html

    Member of:
    Center for Sleep and Circadian Sciences
    https://med.stanford.edu/cscs.html

    Faculty Affiliate:
    Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance
    https://humanperformance.stanford.edu

  • Jessica E. Gonzalez

    Jessica E. Gonzalez

    Soc Science Rsch Prof 3, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioJessica E. Gonzalez, MSW is the Associate Director for the Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) Network Coordinating Office (NCO). The MHTTC NCO is part of the Center for Dissemination and Implementation (CDI) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Through the MHTTC School Mental Health Initiative, Jessica is coordinating the work of 12 centers that provide training and technical assistance to the mental health and school mental health workforce to increase the use of evidence-based mental health prevention, treatment, and recovery support services for students across the United States.

    Jessica has worked in the community as a social worker providing mental health services in school and outpatient clinic settings to children and adolescents of diverse socioeconomic, cultural and ethnic backgrounds. In addition, she has over 10 years of experience in project management and coordination for research and evaluation in the areas of early childhood learning and development, special education, post-secondary education attainment, and delivery of school mental health services. Jessica has also worked for several high school and college programs in the area seeking to improve educational outcomes for first-generation and low-income students of color.

  • Cheryl Gore-Felton, Ph.D.

    Cheryl Gore-Felton, Ph.D.

    Walter E. Nichols, MD Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical focus is the treatment of anxiety disorders, including post traumatic stress disorder. My research focuses on developing effective psychotherapy interventions to reduce chronic stress as well as enhance positive health behaviors to reduce morbidity and mortality among patients coping with chronic, medical illnesses which are often life threatening.

  • Heather Gotham

    Heather Gotham

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Gotham’s research focuses on implementation science, including factors affecting implementation, and training and education of health care providers, across a range of evidence-based practices for adolescent and adult substance use and mental health disorders, co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, and screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT).

  • Laura Michele Hack

    Laura Michele Hack

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Laura Hack is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Director of Novel & Precision Neurotherapeutics at the Stanford Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness, Director of the Stanford Translational Precision Mental Health Clinic, and Deputy Director of the Precision Neuromodulation Clinic (PNC) within the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Dr. Hack's translational research program focuses on identifying bioclinical subtypes of depression and testing mechanistically-guided treatments for these subtypes. Dr. Hack studies treatments spanning repurposed medications, such as pramipexole and guanfacine, neuromodulation techniques, ketamine, MDMA, and psilocybin. Clinically, she specializes in delivering novel treatments, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and ketamine, to patients suffering from treatment-resistant depression and comorbid trauma-related disorders.

  • Haijing Wu Hallenbeck

    Haijing Wu Hallenbeck

    Instructor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioHaijing Hallenbeck, PhD, is a research investigator at the National Center for PTSD Dissemination & Training Division at VA Palo Alto Health Care System. She is also an Instructor (Affiliated) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Washington University in St. Louis and completed her predoctoral clinical internship and postdoctoral research fellowship at VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Funded by the VA VISN 21 Early Career Award Program, Dr. Hallenbeck's research focuses on PTSD and depression and their impact on psychosocial functioning. She studies how to leverage digital health technology (e.g., mobile apps) and analytic tools (e.g., machine learning) to provide timely and personalized assessments and interventions for these conditions.

    Email: haijing.hallenbeck@stanford.edu

  • Kate Hardy

    Kate Hardy

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioKate Hardy is a California Licensed Psychologist who has specialized in working with individuals with psychosis for over 15 years in both research and clinical settings. Dr. Hardy received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom. She has worked in specialist early psychosis services in both the UK and the US, including UCSF’s Prodrome Assessment Research and Treatment (PART) program, where she completed her post-doctoral fellowship, and as Clinical Director for the Prevention and Recovery from Early Psychosis (PREP) program. Dr. Hardy has significant experience in providing CBTp to individuals with early psychosis, and those at risk of developing psychosis, in both individual and group settings and integration of this clinical intervention to broader systems and staff teams. She has led multiple trainings and workshops in CBTp to a wide variety of audiences including community clinicians, psychiatrists, and families, and provides ongoing supervision and consultation in this approach. Dr. Hardy is also involved in the implementation of national strategies to increase dissemination of early psychosis models with the aim of bringing these cutting edge treatments to a broader population.

  • Alesha Heath

    Alesha Heath

    Basic Life Res Scientist, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioDr. Alesha Heath is a Postdoctoral Scholar at Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford School of Medicine and the MIRECC the VA Palo Alto. She earned her PhD from the University of Western Australia and Sorbonne University.

    Dr. Heath's research has been primarily focused on the mechanisms and applications of brain stimulation therapies, in particular repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Her research involves both basic and clinical components with the aim of improving the efficacy of these therapies for the treatment of disorders such as depression and Alzheimer's disease.

  • Keith Humphreys

    Keith Humphreys

    Esther Ting Memorial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Humphreys researches individual and societal level interventions for addictive and psychiatric disorders. He focuses particularly on evaluating the outcomes of professionally-administered treatments and peer-operated self-help groups (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous), and, analyzing the impact of public policies touching addiction, mental health, public health, and public safety.

  • Shaili Jain, MD

    Shaili Jain, MD

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Jain serves as a psychiatrist at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. She is board certified in general psychiatry, with specialty expertise in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), primary and mental health integrated care, and women’s health psychiatry. She is a health services researcher, affiliated with the National Center for PTSD, who focuses on developing innovative ways to enhance the reach of mental healthcare in underserved populations with PTSD. Her work is widely accredited for elucidating the role of paraprofessionals and peers in the treatment of American veterans with PTSD.

    Dr. Jain is an internationally recognized leader in communicating to the public about trauma and PTSD. Her posts for her Psychology Today blog on PTSD, In the Aftermath of Trauma, have been viewed over 250,000 times. Her acclaimed debut non-fiction trade book, The Unspeakable Mind: Stories of Trauma and Healing from the Frontlines of PTSD Science (Harper, 2019), was nominated for a National Book Award, and her essays and commentaries on trauma and PTSD have been presented by the BBC, CNN, The New York Times, STAT, Newsweek, The Los Angeles Times, TEDx, public radio, and others

  • Debra Lee Kaysen

    Debra Lee Kaysen

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health & Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMuch of my current research focus is on the development of testing of accessible, scaleable, and effective treatments for trauma-related disorders and related comorbidities (e.g. substance use disorders, HIV, mood disorders). This work has focused on addressing trauma-related disorders especially in underserved populations and settings. This includes research in rural communities, with Native American communities, and with sexual minorities. My research has had a strong impact on building an evidence base on adaptations of psychotherapies for PTSD and substance use disorders for diverse populations both within and outside the United States. Our findings demonstrate that complex cognitive behavioral psychotherapies like Cognitive Processing Therapy can be culturally adapted and delivered in challenging settings (conflict settings, high poverty environments) with significant and lasting change in PTSD, depression, and functioning. This has led to work adapting CPT for diverse populations within the United States (rural Native Americans, urban Latinos) and outside of it (Iraq, DRC). Other research has focused on treatment for PTSD/SUD. My research has also found support for the use of brief telehealth interventions to build treatment engagement and to reduce drinking among trauma-exposed populations. In addition, my work has been critical in testing the feasibility of novel trauma-focused interventions for use by those with PTSD and SUD, thus paving the road for more rigorous research studies.

    Current PI'ed research studies include: 1) developing and evaluating a brief motivational interviewing intervention designed to increase treatment-seeking among military personnel with untreated PTSD; a two-arm randomized comparative effectiveness trial to evaluate prevention of HIV/STI sexual risk behavior by addressing PTSD through Narrative Exposure Therapy or substance use through Motivational Interviewing among Native American men and women with PTSD; and 3) a comparison of outcomes among patients randomized to initially receive pharmacotherapy or Written Exposure Therapy delivered in primary care as well as comparing outcomes among patients randomized to treatment sequences (i.e., switching and augmenting) for patients who do not respond to the initial treatment.

  • Corey Keller, MD, PhD

    Corey Keller, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of my lab is to understand the fundamental principles of human brain plasticity and build trans-diagnostic real-time monitoring platforms for personalized neurotherapeutics.

    We use an array of neuroscience methods to better understand the basic principles of how to create change in brain circuits. We use this knowledge to develop more effective treatment strategies for depression and other psychiatric disorders.

  • Christina Khan, MD, PhD

    Christina Khan, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Christina Khan is a pediatric and adult psychiatrist and Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. She specializes in the treatment of trauma, depression, anxiety, LGBTQ+ health, and physician wellness. Dr. Khan’s training includes doctoral and postdoctoral research training in community and public health, including specialized training in global health and PTSD research and treatment. Her work focuses on addressing health disparities in underserved populations and treating vulnerable and marginalized populations here in the United States and abroad.

    At Stanford, she is co-Chief of the Diversity and Cultural Mental Health Section in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and founder and Director of THRIVE, Stanford's LGBTQ+ mental health clinic. She has been working with WellConnect since 2014 addressing burnout, trauma, and secondary trauma in Stanford physicians. Dr. Khan is also a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH) and serves on the CIGH Program Leadership Committee.

    Nationally, Dr. Khan serves as Past President of the Association of Women Psychiatrists and as Councilor for the Council on Minority Mental Health and Health Disparities of the American Psychiatric Association.

  • Jane P. Kim

    Jane P. Kim

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kim’s research focuses on applying statistical approaches to evaluate and improve digital interventions, and using empirical approaches to understand ethical considerations for AI applications in healthcare.

  • Steven Lindley

    Steven Lindley

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMaximizing the use of evidence-based practices and reducing unnecessary medical burden of psychiatric treatments for stress-related disorders.

  • Michelle Madore, Ph.D.

    Michelle Madore, Ph.D.

    Staff, Psych/Major Laboratories and Clinical & Translational Neurosciences Incubator
    Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioDr. Madore is multiracial, Filipina woman working as a Clinical Neuropsychologist at VA Palo Alto Healthcare System (VAPAHCS) in the Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC).  Here she serves as the Director of the National Clinical Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) Program whose mission is to: 1) increase the availability of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) for treatment-resistant depression in Veterans and (2) gain a greater understanding of the treatment efficacy of TMS in our complex Veteran population. She is also the Co-Director of the Sierra Pacific MIRECC Advanced Fellowship at VAPAHCS. Dr. Madore is the site PI on two multi-site funded studies looking at neuroimaging biomarkers of treatment response to TMS in treatment-resistant depression. Dr. Madore is also a Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) at Stanford University School of Medicine’s Department in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

    She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Cincinnati, where she received specialized training in neuropsychology. Dr. Madore completed her pre-doctoral internship at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS).  She has completed postdoctoral training focused on clinical neuropsychology and neurorehabilitation research at VA Martinez, San Francisco VA Medical Center and VAPAHCS.

    Dr. Madore is involved in several professional organizations and serves in several leadership positions. She is the Society of Clinical Neuropsychology Secretary and Treasurer for the Teleneuropsychology and Digital Technologies Special Interest Group of the International Neuropsychological Society.​

  • Mark McGovern

    Mark McGovern

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Mark McGovern is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and, by courtesy, the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Most people who need health care do not receive it. And of those who do, wide variation exists in the quality of the care they receive. Gaps in health care access and quality are worse for certain groups, such as underrepresented minorities and persons living in low-resourced urban and rural areas, and/or in poverty. Enormous disparities exist in health care systems, both private and public. Dr. McGovern is a leader in using rigorous methods of dissemination and implementation (D&I) science to close these gaps in equitable health care delivery.

    His mission is to get the best health care possible to the people who need it the most.

    Dr. McGovern's primary focus is the implementation and sustainment of evidence-based interventions and guideline adherent care in public and private health care systems and organizations. Within the hub of the Center for Dissemination and Implementation (CDI) which he directs, Dr. McGovern is the Principal Investigator (PI) and leads three national dissemination and implementation (D&I) centers: The Center for Dissemination and Implementation At Stanford (C-DIAS); The Research Adoption Support Center (RASC); and, the Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network Coordinating Center (MHTTC). The 3 centers are federally-funded, respectively by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (P50DA05402), the National Institutes of Health Healing Addiction Long Term (HEAL) initiative (U2CDA057717), and the US Department of Health and Human Services Substance Use and Mental Health Services Administration (H79SM081726). Dr. McGovern is also the PI on a multi-site adaptive implementation trial across a state system of care, which aims to integrate addiction medications for persons with opioid use disorder who are receiving services in specialty or primary care organizations (R01DA052975). In addition, he conducts D&I research and practice projects in federally-qualified health centers (FQHCs) across the State of California, in the Stanford Division of Primary Care and Population Health, and in specialty addiction and mental health treatment organizations nationwide. He leads, facilitates and/or actively engages networks advancing D&I science in health, including the NIDA Clinical Trials Network Translation & Implementation Special Interest Group, the NIDA Clinical Trials Western States Node Translation & Implementation Workgroup, the Stanford University Network for Dissemination & Implementation Research (SUNDIR), the VA Palo Alto HSR&D Center for Innovation to Implementation, and the Stanford Medicine Center for Improvement. He is on the Core Faculty of the National Institute of Mental Health Implementation Research Institute at the Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. McGovern is a collaborator on multiple projects as a co-investigator, consultant, or advisory board member. He is a mentor to numerous individuals across the country and at Stanford, from university undergraduates to mid-career faculty and clinical administrators at academic institutions and health care systems nationwide.

  • Martin Stefan Mumenthaler

    Martin Stefan Mumenthaler

    Adjunct Professor, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioMartin Mumenthaler has a PharmD and a PhD in psychopharmacology from the University of Bern, Switzerland. He holds an appointment as Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has been conducting research programs in addiction medicine and psychopharmacology, and teaching and mentoring medical students and residents on a voluntary basis.
    Dr. Mumenthaler has also been working in various full-time positions in the pharmaceutical industry as Director in Clinical Development as well as in Medical Affairs, and as a consultant for early-stage pharma- and biotech companies providing advice on designing and conducting clinical trials, and analyzing and interpreting study results, mainly in the field of addiction medicine and pain.
    His academic research has focused on the effects of psychoactive drugs on human performance, Aerospace Medicine, Alzheimer’s disease, and addiction medicine, and in these areas he has presented his results internationally and published over twenty-five peer-reviewed scientific articles. He has also served as a reviewer for various scientific journals, and is a member of the Research Society on Alcoholism, and an Associate Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association.

  • Kalpana Isabel Nathan

    Kalpana Isabel Nathan

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioKalpana Nathan, MD is an adjunct clinical professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. After completion of residency and research fellowship at Stanford, she served 4 years at the San Francisco General Hospital/UCSF, gaining experience in the areas of substance use, HIV and public health. She worked at Palo Alto VA for more than a couple of decades. She served as chief medical director at Mental Health and Addiction services, El Camino Health for two and a half years, and is a certified physician executive. She has worked and taught in various settings, both inpatient and outpatient, as well as private and public sectors. She is board certified in General, Addiction and Forensic Psychiatry, as well as Lifestyle Medicine. Her interests include wellness and self-care for physicians, women's health, health creation and resiliency building for the community. She is a certified meditation teacher, has completed sprint and Olympic triathlons, and enjoys traveling around the world. She received the outstanding community clerkship preceptor award in 2010 and the Arthur L. Bloomfield Award in Recognition of Excellence in the Teaching of Clinical Medicine in 2015 at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Recent Publications:
    1. Tran BX, Nguyen TT, Boyer L, Fond G, Auquier P, Nguyen HSI,Ha Thi Nhi Tran HTN, Nguyen HM, Choi J, Le HT, Latkin CA, Nathan KI, Husain SF, et al: Differentiating people with schizophrenia from healthy controls in a developing country: An evaluation of portable functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Frontiers of Psychiatry 2023 Jan 26; vol 14

    2. Tatum, J, Nathan, K: The USA. Lancet Psychiatry 2021, 8(5):365-366

    3. Nathan N & Nathan KI: Suicide, Stigma, and Utilizing Social Media Platforms to Gauge Public Perceptions. Front. Psychiatry 2020 January 13

    4. Tran BX, Nathan KI, Phan HT, Hall BJ, Vu GT et al: A Global Bibliometric Analysis of Services for Children Affected by HIV/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Implications for Impact Mitigation Programs (GAPRESEARCH). AIDS Rev. 2019 Oct 3;21(3).

    5.Lee A, Nathan KI: Understanding Psychosis in a Veteran With a History of Combat and Multiple Sclerosis. Fed Pract. 2019 Jun;36(Suppl 4):S32-S35.

    6. Tran BX, Ha GH, Vu GT, Nguyen LH, Latkin CA, Nathan K, McIntyre RS, Ho CS, Tam WW, Ho RC: Indices of Change, Expectations, and Popularity of Biological Treatments for Major Depressive Disorder between 1988 and 2017: A Scientometric Analysis. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Jun 26;16(13)

  • Ruth O'Hara

    Ruth O'Hara

    Director, Spectrum, Senior Associate Dean, Research and Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. O'Hara's research aims to investigate how cognitive information processing deficits subserve affective symptoms in psychiatric disorders, and interact with key brain networks integral to these disorders. To do so, she has implemented a translational, interdisciplinary program that encompasses cellular models, brain and behavioral assays of affective and cognitive information processing systems in psychiatric disorders across the lifespan.

  • Karen Chan Osilla

    Karen Chan Osilla

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Osilla conducts health services research with a focus on delivering substance use services to underserved populations using innovative solutions that decrease health access disparities. Dr. Osilla has been conducting addictions research since 2006 and has been involved in clinical trials evaluating cognitive behavioral therapy, collaborative care, and motivational interviewing interventions (web and in-person) among youth, adult, military, family members, and other hard-to-reach populations.

  • Michael Ostacher

    Michael Ostacher

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Ostacher is Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is the Site Director for the Addiction Medicine Fellowship at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, where he also serves as the Medical Director of the Pharmacology of Addiction Recovery Clinic, the Director of the Bipolar and Depression Research Program and the Co-Director of the VA/Stanford Exploratory Therapeutics Lab, the Director of Advanced Fellowship Training in Mental Illness Research and Treatment for MDs for the VISN 21 MIRECC, and the Site Director at the VA Palo Alto for Advanced Fellowship Training for Stanford. A graduate of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, the Harvard School of Public Health, and Harvard Medical School, he completed his training at The Cambridge Health Alliance at Harvard Medical School in Adult Psychiatry, Public Psychiatry, and Geriatric Psychiatry, and is currently board certified in Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry, and Addiction Medicine. He is the Digital Content Editor for the journal Evidence-Based Mental Health and is on the editorial boards of Bipolar Disorders, the International Journal of Bipolar Disorders, the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Current Psychiatry, and Psychiatric Annals. His current research includes roles as Site Investigator for VA-BRAVE, multicenter, randomized trial comparing long-acting injectable buprenorphine to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone, and trials of psychedelic drugs in psychiatric disorders in Veterans. With funding from NIDA, he studied, along with Jaimee Heffner, Ph.D. at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, smoking cessation in people with bipolar disorder using a novel online psychotherapy derived from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. His primary research interest is in large clinical trials mental health and addiction, and the implementation of evidence-based mental health practices.

  • Daryn Reicherter

    Daryn Reicherter

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Reicherter the director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Laboratory.

    He has expertise in the area of cross-cultural trauma psychiatry, having spent more than a decade dedicated to providing a combination of administrative and clinical services in trauma mental health locally and internationally. He is on the List of Experts for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and for the United Nations’ International Criminal Court. He is on the Fulbright Specialists Roster for his work in international trauma mental health. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Innovations in Global Health at Stanford University. He has created and cultivated new clinical rotations for residency education and medical school education in the community clinics that he operates. And he has created new opportunities for resident, medical student, and undergraduate education in Global Mental Health.

    He has also been involved in the creation of clinical mental health programs for underserved populations in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the Faculty Adviser for the Stanford’s Free Clinic Mental Health Program.

    After receiving degrees in Psychobiology and Philosophy from the University of California at Santa Cruz, Dr. Reicherter completed his doctorate in medicine at New York Medical College. He completed internship and residency and served as Chief Resident at Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics.

  • Carolyn Rodriguez

    Carolyn Rodriguez

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Carolyn Rodriguez is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Stanford University School of Medicine and a Consultation-Liaison Psychiatrist at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs. As the Director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dr. Rodriguez leads studies investigating the brain basis of severe mental disorders. Her landmark clinical trials pioneer rapid-acting treatments for illnesses including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and related disorders. Her NIH-, foundation-, and donor-funded mechanistic and clinical efficacy studies span targeted glutamatergic and opioid pathway pharmacotherapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, psychotherapy and suicide prevention. She is co-author of “Hoarding Disorder: A Comprehensive Clinical Guide,” published August 2022 by APA Publishing.

    Dr. Rodriguez also serves as Deputy Editor of The American Journal of Psychiatry, member of the Research Council of the American Psychiatric Association, member of Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Scientific Council, member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Advisory Group, and Scientific and Clinical Advisory Board member of the International OCD Foundation. She has won several national awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE recognizes investigators who are pursuing bold and innovative projects and is considered one of the highest honors in scientific research. Carolyn presented her research at the World Economic Forum in Davos and Fortune Brainstorm Health 2022 and her work has been highlighted by organizations including NPR, PBS, New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, Newsweek, Fortune, and Time.com. She contributes articles to Harvard Business Review and Huffington Post to share scientific findings with the public.

    Carolyn received her B.S. in Computer Science from Harvard University, followed by an M.D. from Harvard Medical School-M.I.T. and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Genetics from Harvard Medical School. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, she now lives with her husband and three children in Palo Alto.

  • Allyson Rosen, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Allyson Rosen, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioRESEARCH FOCUS
    Translational cognitive neuroscience of aging and dementia. Neuroethics.

    TRAINING
    Dr. Rosen is board certified in clinical neuropsychology with a geriatric focus. She completed college at Brown University, a clinical psychology Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University, clinical neuropsychology internship at the Long Island Jewish Hospital in New York, and clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Rosen completed specialty research fellowship training at the National Institute on Aging (Intramural Research Training Award) and Stanford (NRSA F32, K01) in functional imaging and noninvasive brain stimulation with support from NIA.

    CLINICAL AND RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
    Dr. Rosen is Director of Dementia Education at the Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center at the Palo Alto VAHCS. She is also a neuropsychologist and part of the consensus clinical group and education core at the Stanford’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (NIA). Dr. Rosen’s funded research has focused on applying cognitive neuroscience of aging to improve clinical practice in older adults by using cognitive measures, brain imaging, and noninvasive brain stimulation such as TMS. Studies include using fMRI as an outcome measure for cognitive training, studying how to improve the accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting with and without image guidance, and using structural MRI to avoid postoperative cognitive decline and improve outcome from carotid vascular procedures. She has a longstanding commitment to neuroethics and leads a feature in the Journal of Alzheimer Disease that focuses on ethical issues in new and emerging AD applications.

    ETHICS EDITOR, JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
    Ethics Review
    http://www.j-alz.com/blogs/discussion/protecting-progress

    MIRECC DEMENTIA EDUCATION
    http://www.mirecc.va.gov/visn21/education/dementia_education.asp

  • Craig S. Rosen, Ph.D.

    Craig S. Rosen, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research aims at improving processes and outcomes of mental health care for veterans other people suffering from post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders.

    My primary focus is improving access to evidence-based treatments PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. My second emphasis is using telemedicine technologies to expand access to effective care. My third interest is measurement-based care, using ongoing data on patient progress to inform patients' and clinicians' decisions.

  • Fernanda Rossi, Ph.D.

    Fernanda Rossi, Ph.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rossi’s research focuses on developing, evaluating, and implementing assessment tools and interventions to improve the safety and mental health of individuals at risk of intimate partner violence, suicide, and drug overdose. She is particularly interested in using technology and clinical decision support tools to enhance the quality and implementation of intimate partner violence-, suicide-, and substance use-related care.

  • Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Blake K. Scanlon, Ph.D.

    Adjunct Lecturer, Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences

    BioThe overarching aim of Dr. Scanlon’s research is to develop and evaluate low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. To that end, the Caregiver Technology Division of the Scanlon Lab aims to enhance patient- and family-centered care through novel, broadly customizable, and highly scalable caregiver interventions. In parallel, the Neurodegenerative Division of the Scanlon Lab focuses on the development and application of cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and biological markers for the initiation and progression of neurodegeneration.

    Dr. Scanlon received his bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience and doctorate in Clinical Health Psychology from the University of Miami. After concluding his clinical internship in Geropsychology/Neuropsychology at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (VAPAHCS), he completed fellowships in Aging and Dementia at Stanford University School of Medicine and VAPAHCS. Dr. Scanlon is currently a VA Career Development Awardee in the Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) and Stanford/VA Aging Clinical Research Center where his work focuses on developing and evaluating low-cost, pragmatic and clinically translatable methods for improving management of neurodegenerative disease and dementia. He also serves as Co-Director of the Stanford/VA California Alzheimer's Disease Center, Chair of the VAPAHCS Dementia Committee, and Co-Chair of the Department of Veterans Affairs VISN 21 Dementia Committee.

  • Logan Schneider

    Logan Schneider

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFrom a research perspective, my long-term career plan is to refine the understanding of normal and dysfunctional sleep, much like the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) and Epi4K are doing for the enigmatic epilepsies. Insufficient sleep has been deemed a public health problem with poorly understood behavioral and physiologic sleep disorders lying at the core of the issue. I am currently using well-defined distinct and objective phenotypes (e.g. periodic limb movements, hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy) to acquire the analytic skills necessary to expand my knowledge of both signal processing and genetics, with the former enhancing my ability to identify and/or refine sleep phenotypes, and the latter facilitating the pathophysiological understanding of these phenotypes. As a consequence of a better link between symptoms/phenotypes, physiology, and genetic risks, more personally targeted and effective therapeutics can be developed to address the enriched spectrum of sleep disorders.