School of Medicine


Showing 101-200 of 725 Results

  • Christopher Cheng

    Christopher Cheng

    Adjunct Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research laboratory focuses on understanding the mechanics of the cardiovascular system, especially with respect to interactions between medical devices and the dynamic cardiovascular environment. We use medical imaging, 3D geometric modeling, and custom deformation quantification techniques to investigate disease processes and medical device performance. We are interested in the dynamics of the heart, aorta, and peripheral vasculature, and are always seeking ways to apply our research to current and emerging therapies. While our research pursuits seek to add to the fundamental understanding of cardiovascular biomechanics, all of our projects are directly related to improving medical device design, evaluation, regulation, and their use in clinical practice.

  • Paul Cheng MD PhD

    Paul Cheng MD PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Cheng is a Cardiologist at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Department of Medicine and a member of the Cardiovascular Research Institute. Dr. Cheng received his BEng in Chemical Engineering and BSc in biology at MIT. He subsequently completed his MD/PhD at UCSF working in the Srivastava lab studying how extracellular morphogenic signals affect cardiac development and fate determination of cardiac progenitors. Dr. Cheng completed internal medicine residency and cardiology fellowship at Stanford. His current clinical focus is in amyloidosis and cardio-oncology. During his post doctoral research in the Quertermous lab, he pioneered the application of single cell transcriptomic and epigenetic techniques to study human vascular diseases including atherosclerosis and aneurysm, and applied these techniques to investigate molecular mechanisms behind genetic risk factors for several human vascular diseases including atherosclerosis, and aortopathies such as Marfan's and Loey-Dietz syndrome.

    The Cheng lab takes a patient-to-bench-to-bedside approach to science. The lab focuses on elucidating new pathogenic mechanisms of human vascular diseases through combing human genetics and primary vascular disease tissues, with high-resolution transcriptomic and epigenetic profiling to generate novel hypothesis that are then tested in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. The lab is focused on two broad questions: (1) understanding the biological underpinning of the differences in diseases propensities of different arterial segments in an individual (i.e. why do you have atherosclerosis and aneurysms in certain segments but not others), and (2) understanding the role of perivascular fibroblast in human vascular diseases.

  • Xingxing Shelley Cheng

    Xingxing Shelley Cheng

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) and of Health Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Xingxing Cheng's expertise is in applying the tools of decision science to clinical practice and policy analysis. Her current research is in the following areas:
    1) the costs, effectiveness, and implementation of work-up before kidney transplantation, including pretransplant cardiovascular screening;
    2) ethics of and decision-making in in multi-organ transplantation.

  • Glenn M. Chertow

    Glenn M. Chertow

    Norman S. Coplon/Satellite Healthcare Professor of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Health Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsclinical epidemiology, health services research, decision sciences, clinical trials in acute and chronic kidney disease

  • Christina F. Chick

    Christina F. Chick

    Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines the mechanistic contributions of sleep, cognition and affect to the onset and course of psychiatric disorders across the lifespan. I am particularly interested in adolescence as a period during which changes in circadian rhythm, sleep architecture, and sleep behavior co-occur with neuroendocrine development, psychosocial changes, and the onset of many psychiatric disorders. Given that sleep is a highly treatable target, increasing our understanding of the specific contributions of sleep to psychiatric symptom onset may facilitate the development of targeted interventions to mitigate the course of illness.

  • Allis Chien

    Allis Chien

    Director, SUMS, Mass Spectrometry Center

    Current Role at StanfordDirector, Stanford University Mass Spectrometry (SUMS) core resource laboratory

  • Wah Chiu

    Wah Chiu

    Wallenberg-Bienenstock Professor and Professor of Bioengineering and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research includes methodology improvements in single particle cryo-EM for atomic resolution structure determination of molecules and molecular machines, as well as in cryo-ET of cells and organelles towards subnanometer resolutions. We collaborate with many researchers around the country and outside the USA on understanding biological processes such as protein folding, virus assembly and disassembly, pathogen-host interactions, signal transduction, and transport across cytosol and membranes.

  • Valerie Chock

    Valerie Chock

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurological monitoring in critically ill infants. Altered hemodynamics in neonates, especially in relation to prematurity, congenital heart disease, and central nervous system injury. Determination of the hemodynamic significance and effects of a patent ductus arteriosus in the preterm infant. Utilizing NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy) and other technologies for improved monitoring in the NICU.

  • Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program integrates concepts of chemical biology, protein engineering and structure biology to design new therapeutic leads and generate probes to study biological processes. A key focus of our lab is insulin, an essential hormone in our body to reduce blood glucose levels. We generate synthetic libraries of insulin analogs to select for chemical probes, and investigate natural insulin molecules (e.g. from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails!) to develop novel therapeutic candidates. We are especially interested in using chemical and enzymatic synthesis to create novel chemical entities with enhanced properties, and leverage the strong expertise of our collaborators to apply our skill sets in the fields of cancer biology, immunology and pain research. Our ultimate goal is to translate our discovery into therapeutic interventions in human diseases.

  • Daniel Clark, MD, MPH

    Daniel Clark, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Clark is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiologist with the Adult Congenital Heart Program at Stanford Health Care. He is also a clinical assistant professor with dual appointments in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine and the Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Clark specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) and the management of congenital and acquired heart disease in children. His clinical focus involves the combined use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and other imaging techniques to evaluate patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. Dr. Clark’s extensive training and experience with these techniques include multiple fellowships in adult cardiology, cardiovascular imaging, and ACHD.

    Dr. Clark is currently a co-investigator on multiple research studies. During his fellowship, he received a training grant from the National Institutes of Health enabling evaluation of the ability of CMR to diagnose COVID-19-associated heart inflammation among college athletes. He currently uses CMR to assess heart transplant outcomes in donors positive for hepatitis C virus. Dr. Clark also received a research grant from the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Association supporting a randomized, controlled clinical trial of cardiac rehabilitation among patients with Fontan failure.

    Dr. Clark serves as a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including The New England Journal of Medicine, Circulation, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA). He serves on the editorial board for both JAHA and Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging. He is also a member of numerous professional medical societies, including the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the Adult Congenital Heart Association.

  • Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and of Pediatrics

    BioDr. Clarke is a preventive cardiologist and a physician-scientist focused on disease prevention. He earned his undergraduate degree in human biology from the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University before obtaining his MD and PhD (genetics) from Stanford University School of Medicine. He has completed clinical training in internal medicine (Brigham & Women’s Hospital), pediatrics (Boston Children’s Hospital), and cardiovascular medicine (Stanford Hospital), and he is board certified in all three specialties. His research is focused on 1) understanding complex disease genetics in diverse populations, 2) integrating monogenic and polygenic risk with clinical risk, 3) large-scale phenotyping using the electronic health record and medical images. His clinical practice focuses on identifying risk factors for cardiovascular disease with the goal of promoting health and longevity through evidence-based personalized treatment. He is interested in developing family-centric approaches for the treatment of adults and children carrying genetic risk for disease.

  • William Clusin, MD

    William Clusin, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiac action potentials; tissue culture, voltage, clamp technique; role of calcium in ischemia arrhythmias; coronary, artery disease; myocardial infarction.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Senior Associate Vice Provost for Research, Addie and Al Macovski Professor and Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Carol Conrad

    Carol Conrad

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in studying the effects of inflammation in the lung, in particular, how N-acetylcysteine may affect and decrease that in CF patients. I am the PI of a multi-center study researching this question. Additionally, in a separate study involving children who have received lung transplants, I am a participating site in an NIH-sponsored observational and mechanistic multi-center study that will examine the role of viral infections in causing chronic graft rejection.

  • Christopher H. Contag

    Christopher H. Contag

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop and use the tools of molecular imaging to understand oncogenesis, reveal patterns of cell migration in immunosurveillance, monitor gene expression, visualize stem cell biology, and assess the distribution of pathogens in living animal models of human biology and disease. Biology doesn't occur in "a vacuum" or on coated plates--it occurs in the living body and that's were we look for biological patterns and responses to insult.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Markus Covert

    Markus Covert

    Shriram Chair of the Department of Bioengineering, Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur focus is on building computational models of complex biological processes, and using them to guide an experimental program. Such an approach leads to a relatively rapid identification and validation of previously unknown components and interactions. Biological systems of interest include metabolic, regulatory and signaling networks as well as cell-cell interactions. Current research involves the dynamic behavior of NF-kappaB, an important family of transcription factors.

  • Gerald Crabtree

    Gerald Crabtree

    David Korn, MD, Professor of Pathology and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChromatin regulation and its roles in human cancer and the development of the nervous system. Engineering new methods for studying and controlling chromatin and epigenetic regulation in living cells.

  • Bianxiao Cui

    Bianxiao Cui

    Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur objective is to develop new biophysical methods to advance current understandings of cellular machinery in the complicated environment of living cells. Currently, we are focusing on four research areas: (1) Membrane curvature at the nano-bio interface; (2) Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) for scalable intracellular electrophysiology; (3) Electrochromic optical recording (ECORE) for neuroscience; and (4) Optical control of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases.

  • Maria Elizabeth Currie, MD, PhD

    Maria Elizabeth Currie, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Currie is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiothoracic surgeon. She is also a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine. With subspecialty training in heart failure, Dr. Currie treats all forms of cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and valvular heart disease. She performs heart transplant, lung transplant, and combined heart-lung transplant procedures as part of a multidisciplinary team. She excels at valve surgery and the implantation of mechanical circulatory support systems.

    Dr. Currie welcomes referrals from cardiologists and primary care physicians as early as possible when cardiovascular disease is suspected. Understanding that early intervention can prevent later complications, she invites communication about screening, diagnostics, and treatment strategies.

    For each patient, Dr. Currie’s goal is to achieve the best possible outcome using the most advanced minimally invasive cardiac care techniques and technology available. Combined with technical expertise and a focus on excellent clinical outcomes, Dr. Currie delivers empathetic, thoughtful patient care. She ensures that patients are well informed about what they can expect both before and after their surgical procedure.

    Dr. Currie is passionate about improving the safety of cardiac surgery. Her research includes translational studies on new ways to visualize anatomic structures that are difficult to see during minimally invasive surgery. One published study investigated the use of augmented reality (AR) guided by transesophageal echocardiography in minimally invasive mitral valve repair. Her work has appeared in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, The International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery, Transplant Immunology, and other peer reviewed publications.

    Dr. Currie’s interest in technological advances is rooted in her commitment to the evolution of technology and technique in the fast-changing, relatively young field of cardiac surgery. Also driving her interest is her PhD background in biomedical engineering. She has made presentations on the use of AR systems, 3D visualization technology, and robotics-assisted surgical procedures at the American Association for Thoracic Surgery Annual Meeting, International Society for Minimally Invasive Surgery Annual Scientific Meeting, and other conferences.

    Dr. Currie has won numerous awards for her research achievements and scholarship. She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Canada. She is also a member of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, the International Society for Minimally Invasive Cardiothoracic Surgery, Women in Thoracic Surgery, and the Association of Women Surgeons. With its long legacy of leadership in cardiac surgery and research, Dr. Currie feels Stanford Health Care enables her to pursue her research interests and offers her patients access to the latest innovations, along with expertise across specialties including engineering and statistics.

  • Martha S. Cyert

    Martha S. Cyert

    Dr. Nancy Chang Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Cyert lab is identifying signaling networks for calcineurin, the conserved Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, and target of immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A, in yeast and mammals. Cell biological investigations of target dephosphorylation reveal calcineurin’s many physiological functions. Roles for short linear peptide motifs, or SLiMs, in substrate recognition, network evolution, and regulation of calcineurin activity are being studied.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUltrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). He obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard U and performed postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Smalley. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.

  • Ronald L. Dalman MD

    Ronald L. Dalman MD

    Dr. Walter C. Chidester Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsVascular biology, arterial remodeling, aneurysm development; innovative treatment strategies for AAA, animal models of arterial disease, arterial remodeling and flow changes in spinal cord injury, genetic regulation of arterial aneurysm formation

  • Rajesh Dash, MD PhD;      Director of SSATHI & CardioClick

    Rajesh Dash, MD PhD; Director of SSATHI & CardioClick

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have two research areas:
    1) Heart disease in South Asians - genetic, metabolic, & behavioral underpinnings of an aggressive phenotype.

    2) Imaging cell injury & recovery in the heart. Using Cardiac MRI to visualize signals of early injury and facilitating preventive medical therapy. Optimizing new imaging methods for viable cells to delineate live heart cells or transplanted stem cells.

  • Reinhold Dauskardt

    Reinhold Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • Kiera Davis

    Kiera Davis

    Clinical Associate Director, Education & Training & Project Leader, ValleyCare, Med/Stanford Center for Clinical Research

    Current Role at StanfordClinical Associate Director, Education & Training
    Program Lead, SHC Tri-Valley Program Management Office (PMO)

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    Director, Stanford Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection and the Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Vinicio de Jesus Perez MD

    Vinicio de Jesus Perez MD

    Associate Dean of Stanford MD Admissions and Associate Professor of Medicine (PACCM)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work is aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). I am interested in understanding the role that the BMP and Wnt pathways play in regulating functions of pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells both in health and disease.

  • Robert DeBusk

    Robert DeBusk

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and clinical epidemiology of myocardial, infarction; exercise testing; cardiac risk factor management;, cardiac rehabilitation; systems for patient management; ischemic, heart disease; computer-based expert systems.

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 02/26/2024 To 02/25/2025

    BioUtkan Demirci is a tenured professor in the School of Medicine at Stanford University and serves as the Interim Division Chief and Director of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection in the Department of Radiology. Prior to Stanford, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and a faculty member of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology division.

    Professor Demirci received his PhD from Stanford University in Electrical Engineering in 2005 and holds M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering, and in Management Science and Engineering. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, 24 book chapters, 7 edited books, and several hundred abstracts and proceedings, as well as having over 25 patents and disclosures pending or granted. He has mentored and trained hundreds of successful scientists, entrepreneurs and academicians and fostered research and industry collaborations around the world. Dr. Demirci was awarded the NSF CAREER Award, and IEEE EMBS Early Career Award. He is currently a fellow of the the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE, 2017), and Distinguished Investigator of the Academy for Radiology and Biomedical Imaging Research and serves as an editorial board member for a number of peer-reviewed journals.

    The BAMM Lab group focuses on developing innovative extracellular vesicle isolation tools, point-of-care technologies and creating microfluidic platforms for early cancer detection with broad applications to multiple diseases including infertility and HIV. Dr. Demirci’s lab has collaborated with over 50 research groups and industry partners around the world. His seminal work in microfluidics has led to the development of innovative FDA-approved platform technologies in medicine and many of his inventions have been industry licensed. He holds several FDA-approved and CE-marked technologies that have been widely used by fertility clinics with assisted reproductive technologies leading to over thousands of live births globally and in the US.

    Dr. Demirci is a serial academic entrepreneur and co-founder of DxNow, Zymot, Levitas Bio, Mercury Biosciences and Koek Biotech and serves as an advisor, consultant and/or board member to some early stage companies and investment groups.

  • Tushar Desai

    Tushar Desai

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBasic and translational research in lung stem cell biology, cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, and acute lung injury/ARDS. Upper airway stem cell CRISPR gene correction followed by autologous stem cell transplantation to treat Cystic fibrosis. Using lung organoids and precision cut lung slice cultures of mouse and human lungs to study molecular regulation of lung stem cells. Using transgenic mice to visualize Wnt protein transmission from niche cell to stem cell in vivo.

  • Gundeep Dhillon, MD, MPH

    Gundeep Dhillon, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Use of an administrative database (UNOS) to study lung transplant outcomes.
    2. Expression of the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) 1 antibody in peripheral blood after lung transplantation and its association with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (chronic rejection).
    3. Impact of airway hypoxia, due to lack of bronchial circulation, on long-term lung transplant outcomes.
    4. CMV specific T-cell immunity in lung transplant recipients and its impact on acute rejection.

  • Jennifer Dionne

    Jennifer Dionne

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology

    BioJennifer Dionne is the Senior Associate Vice Provost of Research Platforms/Shared Facilities and an Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Radiology (by courtesy) at Stanford. Jen received her Ph.D. in Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology, advised by Harry Atwater, and B.S. degrees in Physics and Systems & Electrical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining Stanford, she served as a postdoctoral researcher in Chemistry at Berkeley, advised by Paul Alivisatos. Jen's research develops nanophotonic methods to observe and control chemical and biological processes as they unfold with nanometer scale resolution, emphasizing critical challenges in global health and sustainability. Her work has been recognized with the Alan T. Waterman Award (2019), an NIH Director's New Innovator Award (2019), a Moore Inventor Fellowship (2017), the Materials Research Society Young Investigator Award (2017), Adolph Lomb Medal (2016), Sloan Foundation Fellowship (2015), and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (2014), and was featured on Oprah’s list of “50 Things that will make you say ‘Wow!'"

  • Rajiv Doshi, MD

    Rajiv Doshi, MD

    Adjunct Professor and Director, India Biodesign Program, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rajiv Doshi serves as an Adjunct Professor of Medicine and as the Director of the India Program at the Byers Center for Biodesign. Dr. Doshi is also the co-Director of the India-based Founders Forum, an executive education training program for India’s leading health technology entrepreneurs. He has also advised the Government of India and various Indian state governments in the development of policies that support Indian health technology innovation.

  • N. Lance Downing

    N. Lance Downing

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Biomedical Informatics Research

    BioI am board-certified internal medicine and clinical informatics. I am a primary care physician and teaching hospitalist. I have published work in the New England Journal of Medicine, Health Affairs, Annals of Internal Medicine, and the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. My primary focus throughout my career has been to deliver personalized and compassionate care that incorporates the latest advancements in medical science. I aim to help all of my patients maximize their healthspan and age with the best quality of life possible.

  • Anne Dubin

    Anne Dubin

    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsArrhythmia management in pediatric heart failure, especially resynchronization therapy in congenital heart disease,Radio frequency catheter ablation of pediatric arrhythmias,

  • Ramzi Emanuel Dudum

    Ramzi Emanuel Dudum

    Clinical Scholar, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
    Postdoctoral Scholar, General Internal Medicine
    Masters Student in Health Policy, admitted Autumn 2022

    BioDr. Dudum is a cardiologist and population health expert working to develop novel risk prediction methods and implementation strategies to create practices and systems that allow for reductions in cardiovascular disease. He completed a Masters in Public Health at Johns Hopkins concentrating in epidemiology and biostatistics and a Doctorate of Medicine at George Washington University.

    He completed internal medicine residency training as part of the Osler Medical Service, where he worked under the mentorship of Drs. Roger Blumenthal and Michael Blaha to study improving cardiovascular risk prediction and coronary artery calcium. Given his focus on population health and implementation science, he also helped launch and refine risk adjustment tools and implemented guideline-directed medical care pathways. During his time there, he was recognized for his clinical acumen and dedication to patient care.

    He came to Stanford for his cardiovascular medicine fellowship and continued research in coronary artery calcium under the mentorship of Drs. David Maron and Fatima Rodriguez while also conducting cardiovascular health implementation science work under the mentorship of Dr. Steve Asch. He serves as the co-investigator of a prospective randomized trial testing the effects of notification of incidental coronary artery calcium on statin initiation rates among those with and without cardiovascular disease (NCT 05588895). He has worked with hospital leaders to implement digital health and artificial intelligence tools, creating the infrastructure for the prospective use of AI-algorithms on radiology studies. As a preventive cardiologist and population health expert, he leads efforts in the preventive cardiology section related to improving cardiovascular health.

  • Alexander Dunn

    Alexander Dunn

    Professor of Chemical Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is deeply interested in uncovering the physical principles that underlie the construction of complex, multicellular animal life.

  • Gozde Durmus

    Gozde Durmus

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Durmus' research focuses on applying micro/nano-technologies to investigate cellular heterogeneity for single-cell analysis and personalized medicine. At Stanford, she is developing platform technologies for sorting and monitoring cells at the single-cell resolution. This magnetic levitation-based technology is used for wide range of applications in medicine, such as, label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood; high-throughput drug screening; and rapid detection and monitoring of antibiotic resistance in real-time. During her PhD, she has engineered nanoparticles and nanostructured surfaces to decrease antibiotic-resistant infections.

  • Irmina A. Elliott, MD

    Irmina A. Elliott, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Elliott is a thoracic surgeon and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. She provides the complete spectrum of surgical care for lung cancer, esophageal cancer, mediastinal tumors, and more through the Stanford Health Care Thoracic Cancer Program. She specializes in minimally invasive, including robotic, approaches to thoracic surgery.

    Dr. Elliott received fellowship training from Stanford University. She completed her residency at UCLA Medical Center.

    Her research has received support from the National Institutes of Health. She has investigated cancer cell response to replication stress, outcomes in patients undergoing hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy (HITHOC) for mesothelioma, complications after esophageal surgery, lymph node involvement in patients with carcinoid tumors of the lung, advanced techniques in robotic surgery, and other topics.

    She has authored articles that have appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Annals of Thoracic Surgery, JAMA Surgery, and other peer-reviewed publications. She also has contributed to textbooks including the content on social disparities in lung cancer for the book Social Disparities in Thoracic Surgery.

    Dr. Elliott has made presentations to her peers at meetings of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Society of Surgical Oncology, Western Thoracic Surgical Association, and other organizations. Presentations focused on surgical treatment of patients with carcinoid tumor of the lung, improvement of mesothelioma patient survival, complications of esophageal surgery, novel targets for cancer treatment, and more.

  • Jesse Engreitz

    Jesse Engreitz

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulatory elements in the human genome harbor thousands of genetic risk variants for common diseases and could reveal targets for therapeutics — if only we could map the complex regulatory wiring that connects 2 million regulatory elements with 21,000 genes in thousands of cell types in the human body.

    We combine experimental and computational genomics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics to assemble regulatory maps of the human genome and uncover biological mechanisms of disease.

  • Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Professor of Radiology (Veterans Affairs)

    BioDaniel Ennis {he/him} is a Professor in the Department of Radiology. As an MRI scientist for nearly twenty years, he has worked to develop advanced translational cardiovascular MRI methods for quantitatively assessing structure, function, flow, and remodeling in both adult and pediatric populations. He began his research career as a Ph.D. student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University during which time he formed an active collaboration with investigators in the Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI). Thereafter, he joined the Departments of Radiological Sciences and Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University as a postdoc and began to establish an independent research program with an NIH K99/R00 award focused on “Myocardial Structure, Function, and Remodeling in Mitral Regurgitation.” For ten years he led a group of clinicians and scientists at UCLA working to develop and evaluate advanced cardiovascular MRI exams as PI of several NIH funded studies. In 2018 he returned to the Department of Radiology at Stanford University as faculty in the Radiological Sciences Lab to bolster programs in cardiovascular MRI. He is also the Director of Radiology Research for the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System where he oversees a growing radiology research program.

  • Gracia Fahed, MD

    Gracia Fahed, MD

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Cardiovascular Institute

    BioDr. Fahed earned her medical degree from the American University of Beirut (AUB) in Lebanon. She graduated at the top of her class and was recognized for her outstanding academic achievements and compassionate patient care. Over the course of her medical studies, Dr. Fahed concentrated her research on understanding the pathophysiology behind endothelial dysfunction, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome. As a postdoctoral scholar in the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, she now focuses on left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and early diagnosis of genetic cardiomyopathy, with a specific focus on transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis, a serious yet often overlooked cause of heart failure. Dr. Fahed aims to improve risk-stratification to enhance diagnostic care and improve cardiovascular outcomes.

  • James Fann

    James Fann

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiac surgery education and simulation-based learning, coronary artery bypass surgery, cardiac valve disease

  • Mohsen Fathzadeh

    Mohsen Fathzadeh

    Genomic Scientist, Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioMohsen Fathzadeh, a seasoned Medical Geneticist, has dedicated over 20 years to genomic science. His academic journey began at Yale University, where he completed his Ph.D. thesis under Prof. Arya Mani, focusing on a genetic form of familial Metabolic Syndrome. From 2015 to 2021, he served as a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University, specializing in Cardiovascular Medicine, Psychiatry, and Public Health Sciences. During this tenure, he conducted comprehensive functional genomic analyses under the mentorship of esteemed professors.

    Mohsen's collaborative efforts with Merck & Co., Inc. led to the identification of a gene regulator associated with body fat distribution. His research scope also includes the characterization of genes linked to insulin resistance and obesity. Recently, he explored the (epi)genetic link between newborn body fat distribution and high maternal gestational glucose levels, focusing on mother-child cohorts from diverse and underserved communities.

    His primary goal is to utilize his findings to enhance our understanding of the genes and evolutionary pathways influencing healthspan and age-related diseases, thereby improving patient lives.

    After completing his postdoctoral research in 2021, Mohsen spent two years in the biotech industry, specializing in genetic testing and variant assessment. He is currently affiliated with Stanford's Population Health Center, studying epigenetic disease mechanisms in mother-child cohorts.

    Outside his professional life, Mohsen leads an active lifestyle and enjoys learning about diverse cultures.

  • William Fearon, MD

    William Fearon, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fearon's general research interest is coronary physiology. In particular, he is investigating invasive methods for evaluating the coronary microcirculation. His research is currently funded by an NIH R01 Award.

  • Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Dunlevie Family Professor of Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include (1) computer simulation and modeling of cardiovascular physiology with specific attention paid to congenital heart disease and its treatment, (2) the evaluation and treatment of pulmonary hypertension/pulmonary vascular diseases, and (3) development and testing of medical devices/therapies for the treatment of congenital heart disease and pulmonary vascular diseases.

  • Katherine Ferrara

    Katherine Ferrara

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy focus is image-guided drug and gene delivery and I am engaged in the design of imaging devices, molecularly-targeted imaging probes and engineered delivery vehicles, drawing upon my education in biology and imaging physics and more than 20 years of experience with the synthesis and labeling of therapeutic particles. My laboratory has unique resources for and substantial experience in synthetic chemistry and ultrasound, CT, MR and PET imaging.

  • Vikram Fielding-Singh

    Vikram Fielding-Singh

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving perioperative care of patients with end stage kidney disease, using biomarkers to aid early diagnosis of acute kidney injury, and evaluating the performance of risk prediction models in perioperative medicine.

  • Andrew Fire

    Andrew Fire

    George D. Smith Professor of Molecular and Genetic Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study natural cellular mechanisms for adapting to genetic change. These include systems activated during normal development and those for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. Underlying these studies are questions of how a cells can distinguish information as "self" versus "nonself" or "wanted" versus "unwanted".

  • Michael Fischbein

    Michael Fischbein

    Thelma and Henry Doelger Professor of Cardiovascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular and genetic mechanisms of aortic aneurysm/dissection development. Molecular mechanisms of aneurysm formation in Marfan Syndrome. Clinical research interests include thoracic aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections).

  • Peter Fitzgerald, MD, PhD

    Peter Fitzgerald, MD, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular), Emeritus

    BioDr. Peter Fitzgerald is the Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Technology and Director of the Cardiovascular Core Analysis Laboratory (CCAL) at Stanford University Medical School. He is an Interventional Cardiologist and has a PhD in Engineering. He is Professor in both the Departments of Medicine and Engineering (by courtesy) at Stanford. Presently, Dr. Fitzgerald’s laboratory includes 17 postdoctoral fellows and graduate engineering students focusing on state-of-the-art technologies in Cardiovascular Medicine. He has led or participated in over 175 clinical trials, published over 550 manuscripts/chapters, and lectures worldwide. He has trained over 150 post-docs in Engineering and Medicine in the past decade. In addition, he heads the Stanford/Asia MedTech innovation program.
    Dr. Fitzgerald has been principle/founder of twenty-one medical device companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has transitioned fourteen of these start-ups to large medical device companies. He serves on several boards of directors, advised dozens of medical device startups as well as multinational healthcare companies in the design and development of new diagnostic and therapeutic devices in the cardiovascular arena. In 2001, Peter was on the founding team of LVP Capital, a venture firm, focused on medical device and biotechnology start-ups in San Francisco. In 2009, he co-founded TriVentures, which is an incubator/venture fund for early stage medical technology in Israel.

  • Dominik Fleischmann

    Dominik Fleischmann

    Professor of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNon-invasive Cardiovascular Imaging
    Image Post-processing
    Contrast Medium Dynamics

  • Michael B. Fowler, MBBS, FRCP

    Michael B. Fowler, MBBS, FRCP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdrenergic nervous system; beta-adrenergic function in, heart failure; drugs in heart failure.

  • Curtis Frank

    Curtis Frank

    W. M. Keck, Sr. Professor in Engineering, Emeritus

    BioThe properties of ultrathin polymer films are often different from their bulk counterparts. We use spin casting, Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and surface grafting to fabricate ultrathin films in the range of 100 to 1000 Angstroms thick. Macromolecular amphiphiles are examined at the air-water interface by surface pressure, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial shear measurements and on solid substrates by atomic force microscopy, FTIR, and ellipsometry. A vapor-deposition-polymerization process has been developed for covalent grafting of poly(amino acids) from solid substrates. FTIR measurements permit study of secondary structures (right and left-handed alpha helices, parallel and anti-parallel beta sheets) as a function of temperature and environment.

    A broadly interdisciplinary collaboration has been established with the Department of Ophthalmology in the Stanford School of Medicine. We have designed and synthesized a fully interpenetrating network of two different hydrogel materials that have properties consistent with application as a substitute for the human cornea: high water swellability up to 85%,tensile strength comparable to the cornea, high glucose permeability comparable to the cornea, and sufficient tear strength to permit suturing. We have developed a technique for surface modification with adhesion peptides that allows binding of collagen and subsequent growth of epithelial cells. Broad questions on the relationships among molecular structure, processing protocol, and biomedical device application are being pursued.

  • Victor Froelicher, MD

    Victor Froelicher, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsScreening of athletes for sudden cardiac death, Computerized ECG and clinical data management; exercise Physiology including expired gas analysis; the effect of chronic and acute exercise on the heart; digital recording of biological signals; diagnostic use of exercise testing; development of Expert Medical System software and educational tools.

  • Eri Fukaya

    Eri Fukaya

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery
    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Fukaya practices Vascular Medicine at the Stanford Vascular Clinics and Advanced Wound Care Center. She received her medical education in Tokyo and completed her medical training both in the US and Japan. She joined Stanford in 2015.

    Vascular Medicine covers a wide range of vascular disorders including chronic venous insufficiency, varicose veins, deep vein thrombosis, post thrombotic syndrome, peripheral artery disease, carotid artery disease, cardiovascular risk evaluation, fibromuscular dysplasia, rare vascular disease, lymphedema, arterial/venous/diabetic ulcers, and wound care.

    Dr. Fukaya has a special interest in venous disease and started the Stanford Vascular and Vein Clinic in 2016.

    Board Certified in Vascular Medicine
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine
    Board Certified in Internal Medicine (Japan)
    Board Certified in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Japan)

  • Gerald Fuller

    Gerald Fuller

    Fletcher Jones Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioThe processing of complex liquids (polymers, suspensions, emulsions, biological fluids) alters their microstructure through orientation and deformation of their constitutive elements. In the case of polymeric liquids, it is of interest to obtain in situ measurements of segmental orientation and optical methods have proven to be an excellent means of acquiring this information. Research in our laboratory has resulted in a number of techniques in optical rheometry such as high-speed polarimetry (birefringence and dichroism) and various microscopy methods (fluorescence, phase contrast, and atomic force microscopy).

    The microstructure of polymeric and other complex materials also cause them to have interesting physical properties and respond to different flow conditions in unusual manners. In our laboratory, we are equipped with instruments that are able to characterize these materials such as shear rheometer, capillary break up extensional rheometer, and 2D extensional rheometer. Then, the response of these materials to different flow conditions can be visualized and analyzed in detail using high speed imaging devices at up to 2,000 frames per second.

    There are numerous processes encountered in nature and industry where the deformation of fluid-fluid interfaces is of central importance. Examples from nature include deformation of the red blood cell in small capillaries, cell division and structure and composition of the tear film. Industrial applications include the processing of emulsions and foams, and the atomization of droplets in ink-jet printing. In our laboratory, fundamental research is in progress to understand the orientation and deformation of monolayers at the molecular level. These experiments employ state of the art optical methods such as polarization modulated dichroism, fluorescence microscopy, and Brewster angle microscopy to obtain in situ measurements of polymer films and small molecule amphiphile monolayers subject to flow. Langmuir troughs are used as the experimental platform so that the thermodynamic state of the monolayers can be systematically controlled. For the first time, well characterized, homogeneous surface flows have been developed, and real time measurements of molecular and microdomain orientation have been obtained. These microstructural experiments are complemented by measurements of the macroscopic, mechanical properties of the films.

  • Margaret T. Fuller

    Margaret T. Fuller

    Reed-Hodgson Professor of Human Biology, Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor of Genetics and of Obstetrics/Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 07/19/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulation of self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation in adult stem cell lineages. Developmental tumor suppressor mechanisms and regulation of the switch from proliferation to differentiation. Cell type specific transcription machinery and regulation of cell differentiation. Developmental regulation of cell cycle progression during male meiosis.

  • Julieta Gabiola

    Julieta Gabiola

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn the Philippines where hypertension and prehypertension are prevalent and medication not affordable, we are looking into prevention of hypertension through education and lifestyle modification as a practical alternatives.

  • Stephen J. Galli, MD

    Stephen J. Galli, MD

    Mary Hewitt Loveless, MD, Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease. We study both the roles of mast cells, basophils, and IgE in normal physiology and host defense, e.g., in responses to parasites and in enhancing resistance to venoms, and also their roles in pathology, e.g., anaphylaxis, food allergy, and asthma, both in mice and humans.

  • Christopher Gardner

    Christopher Gardner

    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of nutrition in individual and societal health, with particular interests in: plant-based diets, differential response to low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss diets by insulin resistance status, chronic disease prevention, randomized controlled trials, human nutrition, community based studies, Community Based Participatory Research, sustainable food movement (animal rights and welfare, global warming, human labor practices), stealth health, nutrition policy, nutrition guidelines

  • Paul George, MD, PhD

    Paul George, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCONDUCTIVE POLYMER SCAFFOLDS FOR STEM CELL-ENHANCED STROKE RECOVERY:
    We focus on developing conductive polymers for stem cell applications. We have created a microfabricated, polymeric system that can continuously interact with its biological environment. This interactive polymer platform allows modifications of the recovery environment to determine essential repair mechanisms. Recent work studies the effect of electrical stimulation on neural stem cells seeded on the conductive scaffold and the pathways by which it enhances stroke recovery Further understanding the combined effect of electrical stimulation and stem cells in augmenting neural repair for clinical translational is a major focus of this research going forward.

    BIOPOLYMER SYSTEMS FOR NEURAL RECOVERY AND STEM CELL MODULATION:
    The George lab develops biomaterials to improve neural recovery in the peripheral and central nervous systems. By controlled release of drugs and molecules through biomaterials we can study the temporal effect of these neurotrophic factors on neural recovery and engineer drug delivery systems to enhance regenerative effects. By identifying the critical mechanisms for stroke and neural recovery, we are able to develop polymeric technologies for clinical translation in nerve regeneration and stroke recovery. Recent work utilizing these novel conductive polymers to differentiate stem cells for therapeutic and drug discovery applications.

    APPLYING ENGINEERING TECHNIQUES TO DETERMINE BIOMARKERS FOR STROKE DIAGNOSTICS:
    The ability to create diagnostic assays and techniques enables us to understand biological systems more completely and improve clinical management. Previous work utilized mass spectroscopy proteomics to find a simple serum biomarker for TIAs (a warning sign of stroke). Our study discovered a novel candidate marker, platelet basic protein. Current studies are underway to identify further candidate biomarkers using transcriptome analysis. More accurate diagnosis will allow for aggressive therapies to prevent subsequent strokes.

  • Daniel Aaron Gerber, MD

    Daniel Aaron Gerber, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Gerber is a critical care cardiologist and co-director of Stanford's Cardiac ICU. He has dual subspecialty training in cardiovascular and critical care medicine and additional board certification in echocardiography. He completed his residency in internal medicine, fellowship in cardiovascular medicine, and an additional fellowship in critical care medicine at Stanford University and joined as faculty in 2021 as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine’s Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.

    Dr. Gerber manages the full spectrum of heart and vascular conditions with a focus on critically ill patients with life-threatening cardiovascular disease. He is active in medical education, teaching introductory echocardiography to Stanford medical students and residents, co-directing the Stanford Critical Care Medicine Critical Care Ultrasound Program, and lecturing nationally on critical care echocardiography and point-of-care ultrasonography at the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s annual congress. Finally, Dr. Gerber’s research interests focus on optimizing cardiac intensive care, including working with the Critical Care Cardiology Trials Network (CCCTN) - a national network of tertiary cardiac ICUs coordinated by the TIMI Study Group - and studying acute mechanical circulatory support techniques to improve patient outcomes and care processes.

  • Rabin Gerrah

    Rabin Gerrah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Rabin Gerrah is a cardiothoracic surgeon and specializes in surgical treatment of heart diseases such as ischemic, valvular, structural and congenital heart diseases. He has been trained at Harvard University and Columbia University Hospitals. Dr. Gerrah has been involved in multiple medical research projects and has patented and developed innovative surgical devices and technologies.

  • Olivier Gevaert

    Olivier Gevaert

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab focuses on biomedical data fusion: the development of machine learning methods for biomedical decision support using multi-scale biomedical data. We primarily use methods based on regularized linear regression to accomplish this. We primarily focus on applications in oncology and neuroscience.

  • Zaniar Ghazizadeh

    Zaniar Ghazizadeh

    Fellow in Graduate Medical Education

    BioZaniar completed his Internal Medicine training at Yale New Haven Hospital/Yale School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from Tehran University of Medical Sciences and spent a few years as a post-doctoral fellow at Weill Cornell Medicine and Brigham and Women’s Hospital before his residency. His research interest lies in the development of in vitro and in vivo platforms for studying heart regeneration and precision medicine. Zaniar’s work is focused on identifying the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias using several experimental systems ranging from genetically engineered animal models to human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiac cell types. His ultimate goal as a clinician-scientist is to utilize this framework for drug discovery and identifying new therapeutic strategies that can prevent or reverse specific arrhythmias.