School of Medicine


Showing 201-300 of 635 Results

  • Gary Glover

    Gary Glover

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy present research is devoted to the advancement of functional magnetic resonance imaging sciences for applications in basic understanding of the brain in health and disease. We collaborate closely with departmental clinicians and with others in the school of medicine, humanities, and the engineering sciences.

  • Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Professor of Health Policy

    BioJeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD, is a Professor of Health Policy and a Core Faculty Member in the Centers for Health Policy and Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on complex policy decisions surrounding the prevention and management of increasingly common, chronic diseases and the life course impact of exposure to their risk factors. In the context of both developing and developed countries including the US, India, China, and South Africa, he has examined chronic conditions including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, tuberculosis, and hepatitis C and on risk factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity, malnutrition, and other diseases themselves. He combines simulation modeling methods and cost-effectiveness analyses with econometric approaches and behavioral economic studies to address these issues. Dr. Goldhaber-Fiebert graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1997, with an A.B. in the History and Literature of America. After working as a software engineer and consultant, he conducted a year-long public health research program in Costa Rica with his wife in 2001. Winner of the Lee B. Lusted Prize for Outstanding Student Research from the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2006 and in 2008, he completed his PhD in Health Policy concentrating in Decision Science at Harvard University in 2008. He was elected as a Trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2011 and Secretary/Treasurer in 2021.

    Past and current research topics:

    - Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: Randomized and observational studies in Costa Rica examining the impact of community-based lifestyle interventions and the relationship of gender, risk factors, and care utilization.

    -Cervical cancer: Model-based cost-effectiveness analyses and costing methods studies that examine policy issues relating to cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination in countries including the United States, Brazil, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania, and Thailand.

    - Measles, haemophilus influenzae type b, and other childhood infectious diseases: Longitudinal regression analyses of country-level data from middle and upper income countries that examine the link between vaccination, sustained reductions in mortality, and evidence of herd immunity.

    - Patient adherence: Studies in both developing and developed countries of the costs and effectiveness of measures to increase successful adherence. Adherence to cervical cancer screening as well as to disease management programs targeting depression and obesity is examined from both a decision-analytic and a behavioral economics perspective.

    - Simulation modeling methods: Research examining model calibration and validation, the appropriate representation of uncertainty in projected outcomes, the use of models to examine plausible counterfactuals at the biological and epidemiological level, and the reflection of population and spatial heterogeneity.

  • Steven Goodman

    Steven Goodman

    Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in issues relating to the representation and measurement of evidence in medical research, and determinants of the truth of medical findings, using a Bayesian framework. I also do work in evidence synthesis, comparative effectiveness research, and the ethics of clinical research.

  • Jason Gotlib

    Jason Gotlib

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include phase I/II clinical trial evaluation of novel therapies for the following diseases:
    --Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)
    --Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)
    --Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)
    --Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) including:
    Hypereosinophilic syndrome
    Systemic mastocytosis
    BCR-ABL-negative MPDs

  • Or Gozani

    Or Gozani

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the molecular mechanisms by which chromatin-signaling networks effect nuclear and epigenetic programs, and how dysregulation of these pathways leads to disease. Our work centers on the biology of lysine methylation, a principal chromatin-regulatory mechanism that directs epigenetic processes. We study how lysine methylation events are generated, sensed, and transduced, and how these chemical marks integrate with other nuclear signaling systems to govern diverse cellular functions.

  • Dita Gratzinger

    Dita Gratzinger

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have research interests in the interaction of hematolymphoid neoplasia with the microenvironment. For example, I use a combination of immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and image analysis techniques to evaluate the mesenchymal stromal cell compartment in myelodysplastic syndrome (pre-leukemic bone marrow failure disorder). I also have interests in lymphoma vasculature and the tropism of lymphoma for specific types of vasculature.

  • Edward Graves

    Edward Graves

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplications of molecular imaging in radiation therapy, development of hypoxia and radiosensitivity imaging techniques, small animal image-guided conformal radiotherapy, image processing and analysis.

  • Nathanael S. Gray

    Nathanael S. Gray

    Krishnan-Shah Family Professor

    BioNathanael Gray is the Krishnan-Shah Family Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology at Stanford, Co-Director of Cancer Drug Discovery Co-Leader of the Cancer Therapeutics Research Program, Member of Chem-H, and Program Leader for Small Molecule Drug Discovery for the Innovative Medicines Accelerator (IMA). His research utilizes the tools of synthetic chemistry, protein biochemistry, and cancer biology to discover and validate new strategies for the inhibition of anti-cancer targets. Dr. Gray’s research has had broad impact in the areas of kinase inhibitor design and in circumventing drug resistance.
    Dr. Gray received his PhD in organic chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 1999 after receiving his BS degree with the highest honor award from the same institution in 1995. After completing his PhD, Dr. Gray was recruited to the newly established Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF) in San Diego, California. During his six year stay at GNF, Dr. Gray became the director of biological chemistry where he supervised a group of over fifty researchers integrating chemical, biological and pharmacological approaches towards the development of new experimental drugs. Some of the notable accomplishments of Dr. Gray’s team at GNF include: discovery of the first allosteric inhibitors of wild-type and mutant forms of BCR-ABL which resulted in clinical development of ABL001; discovery of the first selective inhibitors of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK), an achievement that led to the development of now FDA-approved drugs such as ceritinib (LDK378) for the treatment of EML4-ALK expressing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); and discovery that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) is the pharmacologically relevant target of the immunosuppressant drug Fingomilod (FTY720) followed by the development of Siponimod (BAF312), which is currently used for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
    In 2006, Dr. Gray returned to academia as a faculty member at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in Boston. There, he has established a discovery chemistry group that focuses on developing first-in-class inhibitors for newly emerging biological targets, including resistant alleles of existing targets, as well as inhibitors of well-validated targets, such as Her3 and RAS, that have previously been considered recalcitrant to small molecule drug development. Dr. Gray’s team developed covalent inhibitors of the T790M mutant of EGFR inspired the development of Osimertinib (AZD9291), now FDA approved for treatment of patients with relapsed lung cancer due to resistance to first generation EGFR inhibitors. Dr. Gray has also developed structure-based, generalized approaches for designing drugs to overcome one of the most common mechanisms of resistance observed against most kinase inhibitor drugs, mutation of the so-called "gatekeeper" residue, which has been observed in resistance to drugs targeting BCR-ABL, c-KIT and PDGFR.
    In 2021, Dr. Gray joined Stanford University where he has joined the Stanford Cancer Institute, Chem-H and the Innovative Medicines Accelerator (IMA) to spur the development of prototype drugs.
    These contributions have been recognized through numerous awards including the National Science Foundation’s Career award in 2007, the Damon Runyon Foundation Innovator award in 2008, the American Association for Cancer Research for Team Science in 2010 and for Outstanding Achievement in 2011 and the American Chemical Society award for Biological Chemistry in 2011, and the Nancy Lurie Marks endowed professorship in 2015 and the Paul Marks Prize in 2019, and the Hope Funds for Cancer Research in 2023.

  • Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSince 1992 my work has concentrated on ethical, legal, and social issues in the biosciences. I am particularly active on issues arising from neuroscience, human genetics, and stem cell research, with cross-cutting interests in human research protections, human biological enhancement, and the future of human reproduction.

  • Harry B Greenberg

    Harry B Greenberg

    Joseph D. Grant Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of pathogenesis; determinants of protective immunity; host range and tissue tropism in liver and GI tract pathogenic viruses and studies of vaccines in people.

  • Peter Greenberg

    Peter Greenberg

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr Greenberg's clinical research involves design and coordination of clinical trials using experimental drugs with biologic focus for both lower and higher risk MDS patients not responding to standard therapies. These studies are particularly based on his prior laboratory investigations of gene expression and hematopoietic regulation in MDS patients. He is Coordinator of the International Working Group for Prognosis in MDS (IWG-PM) which generated the revised MDS classification system (the IPSS-R) and the mutation-based prognostic risk system, the IPSS-Molecular (IPSS-M). This project uses such findings to more specifically characterize and treat MDS patients. He is Chair of the NCCN Practice Guidelines Panel for MDS.

  • William Greenleaf

    William Greenleaf

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab focuses on developing methods to probe both the structure and function of molecules encoded by the genome, as well as the physical compaction and folding of the genome itself. Our efforts are split between building new tools to leverage the power of high-throughput sequencing technologies and cutting-edge optical microscopies, and bringing these technologies to bear against basic biological questions by linking DNA sequence, structure, and function.

  • Noah Greenwald

    Noah Greenwald

    Ph.D. Student in Cancer Biology, admitted Autumn 2017

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUsing deep learning to analyze multiplexed imaging data; profiling the tumor microenvironment to predict response and resistance to checkpoint blockade; integrating genomics, transcriptomics, and imaging to understand how changes in DNA and RNA affect phenotypes at the protein level

  • Xuejun Gu

    Xuejun Gu

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Medical Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsArtificial intelligence in medicine
    Medical imaging and image anlysis
    Treatment planning and clinical decision-making
    FLASH radiobiology study ;

  • James Hallenbeck, MD

    James Hallenbeck, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in hospice and palliative care with emphases on physician education, cultural aspects of end-of-life care, and healthcare system issues.

  • Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Bonnie Halpern-Felsher

    Marron and Mary Elizabeth Kendrick Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch focuses on developmental, cognitive and psychosocial factors involved in adolescents’ and young adults’ health-related decision-making, perceptions of risk and vulnerability, health communication and risk behavior. My research has focused on understanding and reducing health risk behaviors such as tobacco use, alcohol and marijuana use, risky driving, and risky sexual behavior.

  • Summer Han

    Summer Han

    Associate Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery, of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research focuses on understanding the genetic and environmental etiology of complex disease and developing and evaluating efficient screening strategies based on etiological understanding. The areas of my research interests include statistical genetics, molecular epidemiology, cancer screening, health policy modeling, and risk prediction modeling. I have developed various statistical methods to analyze high-dimensional data to identify genetic and environmental risk factors and their interactions for complex disease.

  • Philip C. Hanawalt

    Philip C. Hanawalt

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor in Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current interest includes two principal areas:

    1. The molecular basis for diseases in which the pathway of transcription-coupled DNA repair is defective, including Cockyne syndrome (CS) and UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS). Patients are severely sensitive to sunlight but get no cancers. See Hanawalt & Spivak, 2008, for review.

    2. Transcription arrest by guanine-rich DNA sequences and non-canonical secondary structures. Transcription collisions with replication forks.

  • Sigurdis Haraldsdottir

    Sigurdis Haraldsdottir

    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute

    BioDr. Sigurdis Haraldsdottir, M.D., Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her medical degree and master's degree in medical sciences from the University of Iceland. She did her Internal Medicine training at Boston University Medical Center and training in Medical Oncology at the Ohio State University, before joining the faculty at Stanford. Her clinical and research focus is in gastrointestinal malignancies with a focus on mismatch repair deficient cancers, particularly colorectal cancer. She is conducting population-based research on Lynch syndrome - an inherited cancer syndrome, and recently completed a nation-wide study on Lynch syndrome in Iceland. She received her Ph.D. in Medical Sciences in 2017 from the University of Iceland. Her interests also focus on investigating colorectal cancer genomics, and their effect on outcomes and treatment implications.

  • Pehr Harbury

    Pehr Harbury

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsScientific breakthroughs often come on the heels of technological advances; advances that expose hidden truths of nature, and provide tools for engineering the world around us. Examples include the telescope (heliocentrism), the Michelson interferometer (relativity) and recombinant DNA (molecular evolution). Our lab explores innovative experimental approaches to problems in molecular biochemistry, focusing on technologies with the potential for broad impact.

  • Brian A. Hargreaves

    Brian A. Hargreaves

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications and augmented reality applications in medicine. These include abdominal, breast and musculoskeletal imaging, which require development of faster, quantitative, and more efficient MRI methods that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. My work includes novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods and reconstruction tools and augmented reality in medicine.

  • William Haskell

    William Haskell

    Professor (Research) of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy major research interests and activities over the next several years will focus on the development and evaluation of the objective measurement of physical activity in free-living populations using a variety of sensing devices and mobile phones for data collection and processing. Also, I will continue to direct the Stanford Heart Network with the major mission being to assist community-based CVD prevention/treatment programs implement more effective heart attack and stroke prevention programs.

  • Muhammad Murtaza Hassan

    Muhammad Murtaza Hassan

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford Cancer Center

    BioMurtaza is a chemical biologist that joined the Gray Lab in July 2021 as a postdoctoral researcher. He developed his love for medicinal chemistry and chemical biology at the undergraduate level at the University of Toronto Mississauga which then motivated him to pursue an MSc (York University, Supervisor: Prof. Edward Lee-Ruff, 2017) and PhD (University of Toronto Mississauga, Supervisor: Patrick T. Gunning, 2021) in the field. His PhD work involved the development of some of the most potent and selective HDAC8 inhibitors known-to-date. It incorporated inhibitors with L-shaped conformational constraints to compliment the L-shaped HDAC8 pocket. His current work at the Gray Lab revolves around the development of first-in-class covalent inhibitors for recently discovered epigenetic targets that have been shown to synergize with anticancer immunotherapy. Additionally, he is interested in developing small-molecule chemoproteomic tools that can potentially expand our ability to target otherwise undruggable proteins, by using protein-protein interactions for cross-labelling/drugging interacting proteins.

  • Trevor Hastie

    Trevor Hastie

    John A. Overdeck Professor, Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFlexible statistical modeling for prediction and representation of data arising in biology, medicine, science or industry. Statistical and machine learning tools have gained importance over the years. Part of Hastie's work has been to bridge the gap between traditional statistical methodology and the achievements made in machine learning.

  • Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Melanie Hayden Gephart

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    BioI am a brain tumor neurosurgeon, treating patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. I treat patients with malignant and benign tumors, including glioma, brain metastases, meningioma, and vestibular schwannomas. I direct the Stanford Brain Tumor Center and the Stanford Brain Metastasis Consortium, collaborative unions of physicians and scientists looking to improve our understanding and treatment of brain tumors. My laboratory seeks greater understanding of the mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and disease progression in malignant brain tumors. We study how rare cancer cell populations survive and migrate in the brain, inadvertently supported by native brain cells. We develop novel cell free nucleic acid biomarkers to track brain cancer treatment response, relapse, and neurotoxicity. Our bedside-to-bench-to-bedside research model builds on a foundation of generously donated patient samples, where we test mechanisms of brain cancer growth, develop novel pre-clinical models that reliably recapitulate the human disease, and facilitate clinical trials of new treatments for patients with brain cancer.

    www.GephartLab.com
    www.GBMseq.org
    https://stan.md/BrainMets
    @HaydenGephartMD

  • Gregory M. Heestand, MD

    Gregory M. Heestand, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Heestand is a board-certified medical oncologist with a focus on gastrointestinal cancers, primarily hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and gallbladder cancer. He serves as the medical oncology champion of the Stanford Hepatobiliary Tumor Board, as well as the principal investigator of multiple clinical trials. He collaborates with campus laboratories to help develop new biomarker and treatment technologies. He is the associate director of the Stanford Hematology Oncology Fellowship Program.

    Dr. Heestand and his team take great pride in helping patients and their families face gastrointestinal cancer.

    Outside of the clinic, Dr. Heestand enjoys playing the piano, teaching his kids about music, cooking for friends and family, and surfing the internet for interesting things to read.

  • Stefan Heller

    Stefan Heller

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the inner ear, from its earliest manifestation as one of the cranial placodes until it has developed into a mature and functioning organ. We are interested in how the sensory epithelia of the inner ear that harbor the sensory hair cells develop, how the cells mature, and how these epithelia respond to toxic insults. The overarching goal of this research is to find ways to regenerate lost sensory hair cells in mammals.

  • Lisa Henriksen

    Lisa Henriksen

    Associate Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)
    Sr Research Engineer, Medicine - Stanford Prevention Research Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research aims to improve our understanding of the health risks associated with exposure to tobacco marketing and provide a scientific rationale for new policies to reduce it. I also study use of media to promote and discourage adolescent tobacco use, and the impact of tobacco advertising on urge and craving to smoke.

  • Robert Herfkens

    Robert Herfkens

    Professor of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImaging of cardiovascular diseases with CT, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

  • Tina Hernandez-Boussard

    Tina Hernandez-Boussard

    Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics), of Biomedical Data Science, of Surgery and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy background and expertise is in the field of computational biology, with concentration in health services research. A key focus of my research is to apply novel methods and tools to large clinical datasets for hypothesis generation, comparative effectiveness research, and the evaluation of quality healthcare delivery. My research involves managing and manipulating big data, which range from administrative claims data to electronic health records, and applying novel biostatistical techniques to innovatively assess clinical and policy related research questions at the population level. This research enables us to create formal, statistically rigid, evaluations of healthcare data using unique combinations of large datasets.

  • Rogelio A. Hernández-López

    Rogelio A. Hernández-López

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group works at the interface of mechanistic, synthetic, and systems biology to understand and program cellular recognition, communication, and organization. We are currently interested in engineering biomedical relevant cellular behaviors for cancer immunotherapy.

  • Daniel Herschlag

    Daniel Herschlag

    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is aimed at understanding the chemical and physical behavior underlying biological macromolecules and systems, as these behaviors define the capabilities and limitations of biology. Toward this end we study folding and catalysis by RNA, as well as catalysis by protein enzymes.

  • Mark Hlatky, MD

    Mark Hlatky, MD

    Professor of Health Policy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health
    On Partial Leave from 09/01/2023 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research work is in "outcomes research", especially examining the field of cardiovascular medicine. Particular areas of interest are the integration of economic and quality of life data into randomized clinical trials, evidence-based medicine, decision models, and cost-effectiveness analysis. I am also interested in the application of novel genetic, biomarker, and imaging tests to assess risk and guide clinical management of coronary artery disease.

  • Andrew R. Hoffman

    Andrew R. Hoffman

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanism of genomic imprinting of insulin like growth factor-2 and other genes.Long range chromatin interactions Role of histone modifications and DNA methylation in gene expression.

  • Chris Holsinger, MD, FACS

    Chris Holsinger, MD, FACS

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Holsinger’s surgical practice focuses on the surgical management of benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid, parathyroid and head and neck.

    His areas of clinical interest include endoscopic head and neck surgery, including robotic thyroidectomy, transoral robotic surgery and transoral laser microsurgery, as well as time-honoured approaches of conservation laryngeal surgery, supracricoid partial laryngectomy.

  • Jody Elizabeth Hooper

    Jody Elizabeth Hooper

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am the Director of the Research Autopsy Collaboration at Stanford (RACS) to collect organs and tissues from decedent donors for cancer and disease research. https://med.stanford.edu/racs
    I have a number of research interests associated with my autopsy work, including how the time interval between death and collection (the PMI) affects the condition and research viability of the collected tissue, how valuable blood and tissue cultures behave after death, and how autopsy results affect clinical practice in an established information loop. I have projects exploring physician and family attitudes towards autopsy and the utilization of rapid autopsy tissue in characterizing cancer evolution from genetic and immunologic standpoints.

  • Richard Hoppe

    Richard Hoppe

    Henry S. Kaplan-Harry Lebeson Professor of Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIrradiation immunosuppression; total body irradiation;, psychosocial effects of cancer treatment; treatment of lymphoma;, mycosis fungoides.

  • Brooke Howitt

    Brooke Howitt

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    BioDr. Howitt is a gynecologic and sarcoma pathologist, with academic interests in gynecologic mesenchymal tumors and morphologic and clinical correlates of molecular alterations in gynecologic neoplasia.

  • Dimitre Hristov

    Dimitre Hristov

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and integration of X-ray, MRI and US imaging technologies for radiation therapy guidance; Design of synergistic approaches to radiation therapy delivery; Treatment planning optimization and modeling.

  • Ann Hsing

    Ann Hsing

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center/Cancer Institute) and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Focus
    • Epidemiology of prostate, hepatobiliary, and thyroid cancers
    • Racial disparities in cancer
    • Endogenous hormones/growth factors
    • Circadian rhythms
    • Chronic inflammation
    • Genetic susceptibility
    • Cancer prevention and control
    • Global oncology and international studies

  • Joe Le Hsu

    Joe Le Hsu

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in understanding the host-pathogen interaction between Aspergillus fumigatus and the lung transplant recipient.

  • Robert Huang

    Robert Huang

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEpidemiology
    Epidemiology of gastric cancer
    Racial and ethnic disparities in gastric cancer
    Gastric intestinal metaplasia and other precancerous lesions
    Molecular marker development
    Microbiome

  • Andrei Iagaru

    Andrei Iagaru

    Professor of Radiology (Nuclear Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research projects include:
    1) PET/MRI and PET/CT for Early Cancer Detection
    2) Targeted Radionuclide Therapy
    3) Clinical Translation of Novel PET Radiopharmaceuticals;

  • Juliana Idoyaga

    Juliana Idoyaga

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Idoyaga Lab is focused on the function and biology of dendritic cells, which are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate and modulate our body’s immune responses. Considering their importance in orchestrating the quality and quantity of immune responses, dendritic cells are an indisputable target for vaccines and therapies.

    Dendritic cells are not one cell type, but a network of cells comprised of many subsets or subpopulations with distinct developmental pathways and tissue localization. It is becoming apparent that each dendritic cell subset is different in its capacity to induce and modulate specific types of immune responses; however, there is still a lack of resolution and deep understanding of dendritic cell subset functional specialization. This gap in knowledge is an impediment for the rational design of immune interventions. Our research program focuses on advancing our understanding of mouse and human dendritic cell subsets, revealing their endowed capacity to induce distinct types of immune responses, and designing novel strategies to exploit them for vaccines and therapies.

  • Debra M. Ikeda, M.D.

    Debra M. Ikeda, M.D.

    Professor of Radiology (Breast Imaging), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are mammography positioning, tomosynthesis (DBT) cancer detection and diagnosis, MRI, DWI, MRI-guided breast biopsy, breast cancer recurrence, tattoo/ fiducial/wire localization of axillary lymph nodes, breast cancer and FDG PET-CT imaging, artifical intelligence/deep learning, breast density, density notification legislation, COVID-19 effects on Breast Imaging Centers and personnel

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research), of Epidemiology and Population Health and by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMeta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive, personalized, precision medicine and health
    Sociology of science

  • Haruka Itakura, MD, PhD

    Haruka Itakura, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Haruka Itakura is an Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) in the Stanford University School of Medicine, a data scientist, and a practicing breast medical oncologist at the Stanford Women’s Cancer Center. She is board-certified in Oncology, Clinical Informatics, Hematology, and Internal Medicine. Her research mission is to drive medical advances at the intersection of cancer and data science, applying state-of-the-art machine learning/artificial intelligence techniques to extract clinically actionable knowledge from heterogeneous multi-scale cancer data to improve patient outcomes. Her ongoing research to develop robust methodologies and apply cutting-edge techniques to analyze complex cancer big data was catapulted by an NIH K01 Career Development Award in Biomedical Big Data Science after obtaining a PhD in Biomedical Informatics at Stanford University. Her cancer research focuses on extracting radiomic (pixel-level quantitative imaging) features of tumors from medical imaging studies and applying machine learning frameworks, including radiogenomic approaches, for the integrative analysis of heterogeneous, multi-omic (e.g., radiomic, genomic, transcriptomic) data to accelerate discoveries in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Her current projects include prediction modeling of survival, treatment response, recurrence, and CNS metastasis in different cancer subtypes; detection of occult invasive breast cancer; and identification of novel therapeutic targets. Her ultimate goal is to be able to translate her research findings back to the clinical setting for the benefit of patients with difficult-to-treat cancers.

  • Michael Iv

    Michael Iv

    Clinical Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical and research interests include brain tumor and vascular imaging in both the adult and pediatric populations, incorporating advanced MR imaging techniques and analyses using qualitative and quantitative methods.

  • Peter K.  Jackson

    Peter K.  Jackson

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCell cycle and cyclin control of DNA replication .

  • Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests: general oncology, sarcomas. Research Interests: clinical trials in solid tumors.

  • Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe identified a common disorder of aging called clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP). CHIP occurs due to certain somatic mutations in blood stem cells and represents a precursor state for blood cancer, but is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. We hope to understand more about the biology and clinical implications of CHIP using human and model system studies.

  • Ted Jardetzky

    Ted Jardetzky

    Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Jardetzky laboratory is studying the structures and mechanisms of macromolecular complexes important in viral pathogenesis, allergic hypersensitivities and the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation, with an interest in uncovering novel conceptual approaches to intervening in disease processes. Ongoing research projects include studies of paramyxovirus and herpesvirus entry mechanisms, IgE-receptor structure and function and TGF-beta ligand signaling pathways.

  • Daniel Jarosz

    Daniel Jarosz

    Associate Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies conformational switches in evolution, disease, and development. We focus on how molecular chaperones, proteins that help other biomolecules to fold, affect the phenotypic output of genetic variation. To do so we combine classical biochemistry and genetics with systems-level approaches. Ultimately we seek to understand how homeostatic mechanisms influence the acquisition of biological novelty and identify means of manipulating them for therapeutic and biosynthetic benefit.

  • Michael Jeng

    Michael Jeng

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)
    On Partial Leave from 03/01/2024 To 02/28/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests focus on: 1) histiocytic disorders, such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and 2) vascular anomalies and malformations.

  • Kristin Jensen

    Kristin Jensen

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinical translational investigator with a primary interest in breast cancer biology, and the use of investigational and clinical ancillary techniques such as gene and tissue microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis and prognosis of this disease. As a practicing cytopathologist, I also have an interest in improving the fine needle aspiration biopsy diagnosis of breast lesions, again using immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis as adjuncts to cytomorphology.

  • Livnat Jerby

    Livnat Jerby

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImmune responses are highly orchestrated processes that span various interconnected regulatory modalities within and across cells. My lab develops high-throughput, quantitative, engineering-based, approaches to dissect multicellular immune dynamics at unprecedented scale, resolution, and depth, and identify new immunomodulating interventions at an accelerated pace.

  • Hanlee P. Ji

    Hanlee P. Ji

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy of Electrical Engineering
    On Leave from 03/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCancer genomics and genetics, translational applications of next generation sequencing technologies, development of molecular signatures as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in oncology, primary genomic and proteomic technology development, cancer rearrangements, genome sequencing, big data analysis

  • Esther M. John

    Esther M. John

    Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. John has extensive expertise in conducting population-based epidemiologic studies and has led as Principal Investigator multiple large-scale studies, including multi-center studies with a study site in the San Francisco Bay Area with its diverse population. Many of her studies and collaborations investigated cancer health disparities. Her research has focused on the role of modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., body size, physical activity, diet), hormonal factors, early-life exposures, genetic variants, and gene-environment interactions; differences in risk factors by race/ethnicity, breast cancer subtypes, and prostate cancer subtypes; risk factors for familial breast cancer and second primary breast cancer, as well as prognostic factors related to survival disparities.

    As Principal Investigator, Dr. John has led a number of studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, including:

    - the Northern California site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, an on-going prospective multi-generational cohort of over 13,000 families established in 1995 at six international sites;
    - the Northern California site of the WECARE Study that investigates risk factors for second primary breast cancer;
    - the California site of the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study that investigated genetic variability and breast cancer risk and survival in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations in the context of genetic admixture;
    - the Breast Cancer Etiology in Minorities (BEM) Study, a pooled analysis of risk factors for breast cancer subtypes in racial/ethnic minorities;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study in nearly 5,000 Hispanic, African American and non-Hispanic white women that investigated the role of modifiable lifestyle factors and other risk factors;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Prostate Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of lifestyle and genetic risk factors for advanced and localized disease.

    These studies collected and pooled extensive data and biospecimens and continue to support numerous ancillary studies, collaborations and international consortia and have contributed to a better understanding of cancer risk and survival in racial/ethnic minority populations.

    Dr. John is also a founding PI of the LEGACY Girls Study, an on-going prospective cohort established in 2011 that investigates early life exposures in relation to pubertal development outcomes, breast tissue characteristics, and behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in the context of having a family history or breast cancer.

  • Laura Johnston

    Laura Johnston

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), more specifically, allogeneic transplantation and graft versus host disease. Exploring methods of improving prevention and treatment of GVHD as well as the long term follow-up and/or quality of life of affected patients.

  • Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Kalbasi is a board-certified radiation oncologist and physician-scientist at the Stanford Cancer Institute. He is also an associate professor of radiation oncology at Stanford Medicine and a project member of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    In the clinic, Dr. Kalbasi specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors, especially sarcoma and melanoma, with a focus on bringing new treatments to patients. This focus includes using advanced techniques in radiation oncology and cancer immunotherapy.

    Dr. Kalbasi's NIH-funded laboratory studies the cancer-immune interface in various therapeutic contexts, including T cell therapy, cytokine therapy and innate immune agonism. The lab has described tumor cell-, T cell- and myeloid cell-intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to therapy and approaches to overcome therapy resistance. Dr. Kalbasi is also an experienced leader of clinical trials related to immunotherapy, T cell therapy and radiation therapy.

    Prior to his arrival at Stanford Health Care, Dr. Kalbasi was assistant professor of radiation oncology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and chief of sarcoma radiotherapy at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. During his tenure, he was named a NextGen Star by the American Association of Cancer Research in recognition for excellence in cancer research.

    Dr. Kalbasi’s work has been published in leading journals including Nature, Science Translational Medicine, JAMA Oncology, Lancet Oncology, Nature Cancer and Cancer Discovery. He has served as a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cell and the Journal of Clinical Investigation. He has also presented research to his peers at the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  • Aya Kamaya, MD

    Aya Kamaya, MD

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHepatobiliary imaging
    Hepatocellular carcinoma
    Urologic imaging
    Gynecologic imaging
    Thyroid imaging
    Novel ultrasound technologies
    Perfusion CT imaging of abdominal tumors

  • Michael J. Kaplan, MD

    Michael J. Kaplan, MD

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) New therapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer, including immune stimulation possibilities (IRX-2 protocol), integration of biological modifiers, and, eventually, genetic approaches.
    2) Head and neck cancer stem cells: identification, characterization, control--in conjunction with the Irv Weissman and Michael Clarke labs in the Stem Cell Institute
    3) Development of innovative surgical methods at the anterior cranial base

  • Daniel Kapp

    Daniel Kapp

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGynecologic malignancies; Rectal/and cancer; Breast Cancer; Hodgkin's disease; Hyperthermia; intraoperative radiation therapy; High dose rate radiation therapy; Predictive assays; Patterns of tumor spread; Health care finance.

  • Amer Karam

    Amer Karam

    Clinical Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Gynecologic Oncology

    BioDr. Amer Karam is a board-certified, fellowship-trained gynecologic surgeon and clinical professor in the Stanford Medicine Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Gynecology Oncology. He specializes in gynecologic oncology, hospice and palliative care, hereditary gynecologic cancers, laparoscopic and robotic gynecologic surgery, and obstetrics and gynecology.

    Dr. Karam attended medical school at the American University in Beirut. He completed his internship and residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, before completing a fellowship in gynecologic oncology at the University of California Los Angeles and a fellowship in breast surgery at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Karam has a vested interest in minimally invasive and robotic surgery with a practice centered on this approach for the treatment of patients with gynecologic malignancy and complicated pelvic surgery. He is currently director of Robotic Surgery and Outreach in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology.

  • Maya M. Kasowski

    Maya M. Kasowski

    Assistant Professor of Pathology, of Medicine (Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    BioI am a clinical pathologist and assistant professor in the Departments of Medicine, Pathology, and Genetics (by courtesy) at Stanford. I completed my MD-PhD training at Yale University and my residency training and a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University. My experiences as a clinical pathologist and genome scientist have made me passionate about applying cutting-edge technologies to primary patient specimens in order to characterize disease pathologies at the molecular level. The core focus of my lab is to study the mechanisms by which genetic variants influence the risk of disease through effects on intermediate molecular phenotypes.

  • Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Katznelson is an internationally known neuroendocrinologist and clinical researcher, with research expertise in the diagnosis and management of hypopituitarism, the effects of hormones on neurocognitive function, and the development of therapeutics for acromegaly and Cushing’s syndrome, and neuroendocrine tumors. Dr. Katznelson is the medical director of the multidisciplinary Stanford Pituitary Center, a program geared for patient management, clinical research and patient education

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor of Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Harry A. Oberhelman, Jr. and Mark L. Welton Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kebebew’s translational and clinical investigations have three main scientific goals: 1) to develop effective therapies for fatal, rare and neglected endocrine cancers, 2) to identify new methods, strategies and technologies for improving the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine neoplasms and the prognostication of endocrine cancers, and 3) to develop methods for precision treatment of endocrine tumors.

  • Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Khaki is a medical oncologist and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In his clinical practice, he treats patients with all forms of genitourinary cancer, including kidney, bladder, prostate, and testicular. He also regularly attends on the inpatient oncology service at Stanford Hospital.
    With each patient, he is devoted to providing exceptional, humanistic care and has been recognized throughout his career for his humanism. As a medical student, he was named to the national Gold Humanism Honor Society and he received the Reza Gandjei Humanism Award as a medical resident at UCSF.

    His research interests include novel therapies for genitourinary cancers, with a focus on urothelial cancer outcomes. He also has studied health care utilization and costs for end-of-life care of cancer patients.

    Dr. Khaki has earned honors and recognition from the American Association for Cancer Research, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, Conquer Cancer Foundation, and other organizations.

    He has authored numerous articles on topics such as immunotherapy for urothelial cancer, management of cancer patients with COVID-19, and utilization of end-of-life care by cancer patients. In addition, he is an editor for HemOnc.org and theMednet, a physician-only online community where members share clinical questions and answers.

  • Aziz Khan

    Aziz Khan

    Research Scientist, Stanford Cancer Institute Core

    BioAziz Khan is a staff scientist at the Stanford Cancer Institute, where he develops reproducible pipelines and machine learning methods for integrative analysis of multi-omics data at bulk and single-cell resolution to understand tumor evolution and chromatin regulatory dynamics of tumor growth.

    Aziz completed his PhD in Bioinformatics at Tsinghua University, China in 2016 followed by a three year postdoctoral training at the University of Oslo, Norway. During PhD and Postdoc his primary research emphasis was on regulatory genomics and epigenomics. He developed computational methods, tools, and resources to understand the (epi)genomic control of gene regulation in development and disease.

    Apart from research, he is advocating for open science, open-source, preprints, and reproducibility in research. He is a contributor for Bioconda and also developed several open-source tools and resources such as JASPAR. He is ASAPbio and eLife Community Ambassador and co-founded ECRcentral (ecrcentral.org), a community initiative for early-career researchers.

  • Saad A. Khan, MD

    Saad A. Khan, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Khan is a fellowship-trained cancer specialist with board certification in oncology and hematology. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology.

    Dr. Khan focuses on the treatment of head and neck cancers, advanced thyroid cancers, and neuroendocrine tumors. He recognizes the broad effects of these conditions on daily living and aims to develop personalized, comprehensive treatment plans that optimize health and quality of life.

    Dr. Khan’s research interests include therapeutic clinical trials as well as ways to reduce toxicities that some patients may experience when receiving cancer treatment. His research activities include ongoing clinical trials of targeted and immune therapy for aggressive thyroid cancer.

    He has published numerous articles on his research discoveries in peer-reviewed journals such as the JAMA Oncology, Investigational New Drugs, and others. Topics include new drug treatments for small cell lung cancer and for cancers of the head and neck, racial and gender disparities in certain types of cancer, and management of the potentially toxic effects of cancer therapies.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the NRG Head and Neck Committee. NRG brings together internationally recognized groups (the first words in their names form the acronym “NRG”) to conduct cancer clinical research and share study results. The objective is to inform clinical decision making and healthcare policy worldwide.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the ECOG Head and Neck Core and Thoracic Committees. ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) is part of one of the five groups of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) Program.

    He also is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Central IRB for Early Phase Clinical Trials.

    When not providing patient care or conducting research, Dr. Khan enjoys spending time with his family, hiking, and relaxing at the beach.

  • Paul A. Khavari, MD, PhD

    Paul A. Khavari, MD, PhD

    Carl J. Herzog Professor of Dermatology in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe work in epithelial tissue as a model system to study stem cell biology, cancer and new molecular therapeutics. Epithelia cover external and internal body surfaces and undergo constant self-renewal while responding to diverse environmental stimuli. Epithelial homeostasis precisely balances stem cell-sustained proliferation and differentiation-associated cell death, a balance which is lost in many human diseases, including cancer, 90% of which arise in epithelial tissues.

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

  • Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioButrus (Pierre) T. Khuri-Yakub is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received the BS degree from the American University of Beirut, the MS degree from Dartmouth College, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University, all in electrical engineering. His current research interests include medical ultrasound imaging and therapy, ultrasound neuro-stimulation, chemical/biological sensors, gas flow and energy flow sensing, micromachined ultrasonic transducers, and ultrasonic fluid ejectors. He has authored over 600 publications and has been principal inventor or co-inventor of 107 US and international issued patents. He was awarded the Medal of the City of Bordeaux in 1983 for his contributions to Nondestructive Evaluation, the Distinguished Advisor Award of the School of Engineering at Stanford University in 1987, the Distinguished Lecturer Award of the IEEE UFFC society in 1999, a Stanford University Outstanding Inventor Award in 2004, Distinguished Alumnus Award of the School of Engineering of the American University of Beirut in 2005, Stanford Biodesign Certificate of Appreciation for commitment to educate, mentor and inspire Biodesgin Fellows, 2011, and 2011 recipient of IEEE Rayleigh award.