Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


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  • Jessica Yu

    Jessica Yu

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioJessica Yu joined the Climate and Energy Policy Program (CEPP) and the Woods Institute for the Environment as a Postdoctoral Fellow in September 2022. Her current research focuses on the development of generalized public health guidance and best practices for protecting vulnerable populations from the health impacts of wildfire smoke. Working within an interdisciplinary team at CEPP, her goal is to continue applying and expanding her scientific skills to address the emerging threats of wildfire and other climate change-related policy challenges in California and beyond.

    Prior to joining Stanford, she completed her PhD in Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia and an MSc in Global Health at McMaster University, where she worked on occupational and environmental health research with slum and mining communities in India and South Africa. Beyond academia, she's interested in learning how policy, technology, and social entrepreneurship can be leveraged to address inequalities in global environmental health and devise pro-equity and community-level solutions.

  • Miki Yu

    Miki Yu

    Assistant Director, Strategic Energy Alliance, Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioMiki Yu joined Precourt Institute for Energy (PIE) as an Event and Outreach Program Planner. In this role she will help shape the programs that PIE, TomKat Center and GCEP offer as they build greater visibility within the Stanford community, the energy community at large, and throughout the world.

    Miki started at Stanford working for the Office of Development in 2002, where she reported to the Vice President’s office. She then joined the Stanford Challenge Campaign as an initial team member, working with OOD partners and engaging volunteers and donors at every stage to build and direct momentum for The Stanford Challenge campaign. She was instrumental in executing the Leading Matters component of the campaign, which achieved record breaking attendance and engagement results.

  • Xueying Yu

    Xueying Yu

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioMy research interests include atmospheric chemistry, greenhouse gas emissions, satellite remote sensing retrievals, and carbon mitigation. I use inverse modeling and other data-driven approaches to address the above issues across multiple scales, in particular, to quantify methane emissions from point source level to the global budget.

  • Yifan Yu

    Yifan Yu

    Ph.D. Student in Geophysics, admitted Autumn 2022

    BioYifan is a PhD student in Geophysics, advised by Prof. Greg Beroza. His research interests include earthquake source study, location, and machine learning. He received bachelor degree in geophysics from Nanjing University.

  • Emily Juliette Zakem

    Emily Juliette Zakem

    Assist Prof (By Courtesy), Earth System Science

    BioEmily Zakem is a Principal Investigator at the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science. Previously, she was a Simons Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Marine Microbial Ecology at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. She completed her Ph.D. in Climate Physics and Chemistry in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In her research, she aims to improve understanding of the connections between microbial ecosystems, global biogeochemistry, and the climate system. She uses theory and mathematical models to understand how microbial ecology drives carbon, nitrogen, and other elemental cycling. She develops broadly applicable models of microbial populations, grounded in underlying chemical and physical constraints, in order to robustly predict the biogeochemistry of past, present, and future environments.

  • Richard Zare

    Richard Zare

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science and Professor, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research group is exploring a variety of topics that range from the basic understanding of chemical reaction dynamics to the nature of the chemical contents of single cells.

    Under thermal conditions nature seems to hide the details of how elementary reactions occur through a series of averages over reagent velocity, internal energy, impact parameter, and orientation. To discover the effects of these variables on reactivity, it is necessary to carry out studies of chemical reactions far from equilibrium in which the states of the reactants are more sharply restricted and can be varied in a controlled manner. My research group is attempting to meet this tough experimental challenge through a number of laser techniques that prepare reactants in specific quantum states and probe the quantum state distributions of the resulting products. It is our belief that such state-to-state information gives the deepest insight into the forces that operate in the breaking of old bonds and the making of new ones.

    Space does not permit a full description of these projects, and I earnestly invite correspondence. The following examples are representative:

    The simplest of all neutral bimolecular reactions is the exchange reaction H H2 -> H2 H. We are studying this system and various isotopic cousins using a tunable UV laser pulse to photodissociate HBr (DBr) and hence create fast H (D) atoms of known translational energy in the presence of H2 and/or D2 and using a laser multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect the nascent molecular products in a quantum-state-specific manner by means of an imaging technique. It is expected that these product state distributions will provide a key test of the adequacy of various advanced theoretical schemes for modeling this reaction.

    Analytical efforts involve the use of capillary zone electrophoresis, two-step laser desorption laser multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We believe these methods can revolutionize trace analysis, particularly of biomolecules in cells.

  • Howard Zebker

    Howard Zebker

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My students and I study the surfaces of Earth and planets using radar remote sensing methods. Our specialization is interferometric radar, or InSAR. InSAR is a technique to measure mm-scale surface deformation at fine resolution over wide areas, and much of our work follows from applying this technique to the study of earthquakes, volcanoes, and human-induced subsidence. We also address global environmental problems by tracking the movement of ice in the polar regions. whose ice mass balance affects sea level rise and global climate. We participate in NASA space missions such as Cassini, in which we now are examining the largest moon of Saturn, Titan, to try and deduce its composition and evolution. Our work includes experimental observation and modeling the measurements to best understand processes affecting the Earth and solar system. We use data acquired by spaceborne satellites and by large, ground-based radar telescopes to support our research.

    Teaching
    I teach courses related to remote sensing methods and applications, and how these methods can be used to study the world around us. At the undergraduate level, these include introductory remote sensing uses of the full electromagnetic spectrum to characterize Earth and planetary surfaces and atmospheres, and methods of digital image processing. I also teach a freshman and sophomore seminar course on natural hazards. At the graduate level, the courses are more specialized, including the math and physics of two-dimensional imaging systems, plus detailed ourses on imaging radar systems for geophysical applications.

    Professional Activities
    InSAR Review Board, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (2006-present); editorial board, IEEE Proceedings (2005-present); NRC Earth Science and Applications from Space Panel on Solid Earth Hazards, Resources, and Dynamics (2005-present); Chair, Western North America InSAR (WInSAR) Consortium (2004-06); organizing committee, NASA/NSF/USGS InSAR working group; International Union of Radioscience (URSI) Board of Experts for Medal Evaluations (2004-05); National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo Observatory, Visiting Committee, (2002-04; chair, 2003-04); NASA Alaska SAR Facility users working group (2000-present); associate editor, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1998-present); fellow, IEEE (1998)

  • Markus Zechner

    Markus Zechner

    Adjunct Professor, Earth & Planetary Sciences

    BioMarkus Zechner earned an MS degree in petroleum engineering from Mining University of Leoben. He joined OMV in 2008 as a reservoir engineer in Gaenserndorf, Austria. Zechner worked on gas, gas condensate, and oil reservoirs in the Vienna basin. During 2011 through 2013, he worked on the Technology and
    Reservoir Engineering Teams in the OMV Head Office on CO2 injection and sequestration, water injection under fracturing
    conditions, and polymer injection. In 2013, Zechner started his PhD degree at Stanford University on uncertainty quantification of enhanced oil recovery processes.

  • Xiaolin Zheng

    Xiaolin Zheng

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, of Energy Science Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

  • Yutong Zhu

    Yutong Zhu

    MBA, expected graduation 2023
    Masters Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Spring 2022

    BioWhen in school, I won a nationwide competition in China to make art out of trash. I built a miniature “Olympic stadium” from styrofoam, a winning submission whose prize was a week-long trip to Hong Kong to learn about recycling. Visiting the city’s recycling facilities changed my life: growing up in the heavily polluted city of Xi’an in the 90s, Hong Kong’s cleanliness shocked me. It was my first encounter with the term “sustainability” and determined my career’s trajectory.

    Carbon-capture materials, hydrogen-producing catalysts, energy-efficient aluminum production: all the products and processes that I developed and commercialized at Australia’s national lab have eliminated millions of tons of carbon dioxide and saved clients millions of dollars in energy expenses. I also helped two battery startups commercialize their technologies, and I evaluated hundreds of climate tech companies at an early-stage venture capital firm.

    Equipped with ten years experience commercializing deep tech from zero to one in the sustainability and climate space, I want to build and scale high-efficiency, mass-market climate solutions after Stanford. Interested? Let’s chat.

  • Mark Zoback

    Mark Zoback

    Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    I conduct research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics with an emphasis on shale gas, tight gas and tight oil production, the feasibility of long-term geologic storage of CO2 and the occurrence of induced and triggered earthquakes. I was one of the principal investigators of the SAFOD project in which a scientific research well was successfully drilled through the San Andreas Fault at seismogenic depth. I am the author of a textbook entitled Reservoir Geomechanics published in 2007 by Cambridge University Press, now in its sixth printing. I served on the National Academy of Energy committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon accident and the Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection. I currently serve on a Canadian Council of Academies panel investigating the same topic.

    Teaching
    I teach both undergraduate and graduate students. Reservoir Geomechanics is a graduate class for students in the departments of Geophysics, GES, and ERE, and Tectonophysics, a graduate class for students principally in Geophysics and GES. I co-teach a Freshman class entitled Sustainability and Collapse with Professor Ursula Heise of the English Department. I also help lead two graduate seminars each week and frequently attend and participate in other seminars.

    Professional Activities
    Member, Canadian Council of Academies Committee on Shale Gas Development (2012-2013); Member, Secretary of Energy Committee on Shale Gas Development (2011-2012); Member, NAE Committee Investigating Deepwater Horizon Accident (2010-2011); President, American Rock Mechanics Association (2011-2013); Member of Board of RPSEA (2010-); Chair, Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Group of USGS (2007-2011); Advisory Board, Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona (2008-2013); Chair, Stanford Faculty Senate (1999-2000); Chair, Department of Geophysics (1991-97); Chair, Science Advisory Group, ICDP (1999-2006); President, Tectonophysics Section, AGU (1988-89)

  • Andrea Zorzi

    Andrea Zorzi

    Ph.D. Student in Geological Sciences, admitted Autumn 2020

    BioBorn in Venice, Italy, I earned my BSc in Aerospace Engineering at Università degli Studi di Padova in 2017. For my MSc degree, I moved to the Netherlands and graduated in Aerospace Engineering at TU Delft in 2019, focusing on space flight, planetary sciences and radiative transfer modeling. Afterwards, I spent a year at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen (Germany), conducting research on neural network applications for cometary gas expansion studies.
    I've joined Stanford as a GS graduate student in Fall 2020 and I am part of the Planetary Modeling Group led by Prof. Schaefer.
    My focus is on planetary impacts, how they affect the climate and chemical evolution of the atmospheres of planets in their early stages.