Graduate School of Education


Showing 51-100 of 130 Results

  • Shashank V. Joshi, MD

    Shashank V. Joshi, MD

    Professor (Teaching) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development) and, by courtesy of Pediatrics and, of Education
    On Partial Leave from 10/15/2023 To 05/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Joshi's teaching and research focuses on increasing knowledge and effectiveness of school mental health, youth wellbeing, positive psychology, pediatric psychotherapy and medication interventions. Areas of study include: the therapeutic alliance in medical care, structured psychotherapy interventions, cultural issues in pediatrics, wellbeing promotion and suicide prevention in schools settings, and faculty development in graduate medical education.

  • Connie Juel

    Connie Juel

    Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPoor Reading in Preterms: Neural Basis, Prediction, & Response to Intervention (with Heidi Feldman & Michal Ben Shachar). Five-year grant funded by NICHD, 2012-2017.

    Effects of early elementary school instruction, and specific interventions, on literacy and language growth.

    Longitudinal study of literacy development from preschool through first grade. Focus on classroom factors in 13 kindergarten and 13 first grade classrooms that affect growth across the years in children with different entering skill and language profiles.

  • Ari Y. Kelman

    Ari Y. Kelman

    Jim Joseph Professor of Education and Jewish Studies and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Religious Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Kelman's research focuses on the forms and practices of religious knowledge transmission. His work emerges at the intersection of sociocultural learning theory and scholarly/critical studies of religion, and his methods draw on the social sciences and history. Currently Professor Kelman is at work on a variety of projects ranging from a history of religious education in the post-war period to an inquiry about Google's implicit definitions of religion.

  • William Koski

    William Koski

    The Eric and Nancy Wright Professor of Clinical Education and Professor (Teaching), by courtesy, of Education
    On Leave from 09/01/2023 To 08/31/2024

    BioAn accomplished clinical teacher and litigator, William Koski (PhD ’03) is the founder and director of the law school’s Youth and Education Law Project (YELP). He has also taught multidisciplinary graduate seminars and courses in educational law and policy.

    Professor Koski and YELP have represented hundreds of children, youth, and families in special education, student discipline, and other educational rights matters. Professor Koski has also served as lead counsel or co-counsel in several path-breaking complex school reform litigations including Robles-Wong v. California, that sought to reform the public school finance system in the state; Emma C. v. Eastin, that has restructured the special education service delivery system in a Bay Area school district and aims to reform the California Department of Education’s special education monitoring system; Smith v. Berkeley Unified School District, that successfully reformed the school discipline policies in Berkeley, CA; and Stephen C. v. Bureau of Indian Education, that seeks to hold the federal Bureau of Indian Education accountable for their failure to provide children in the Havasupai Native American tribe in Arizona with an adequate and equitable education.

    Reflecting his multidisciplinary background as a lawyer and social scientist, Professor Koski’s scholarly work focuses on the related issues of educational accountability, equity and adequacy; the politics of educational policy reform; teacher employment policies; and judicial decision-making in educational policy reform litigation.

    Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 2001, Professor Koski was a lecturer in law at Stanford and a supervising attorney at the law school’s East Palo Alto Community Law Project. He was also an associate at Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe and then Alden, Aronovsky & Sax.

    Professor Koski has an appointment (by courtesy) with the Stanford School of Education.

  • Elizabeth Bailey Kozleski

    Elizabeth Bailey Kozleski

    Professor (Research) of Education

    BioI engage in systems change and research on equity and justice issues in inclusive education in schools, school systems as well as state and national education organizations and agencies. My research interests include the analysis of systems change in education, how teachers learn in practice in complex, diverse school settings, including how educational practices improve student learning. Awards include the 2023 Luminary Award from the Division of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Children, Council of Exceptional Children; the 2018 Budig Award for Teaching Excellence in Special Education at the University of Kansas; the 2017 Boeing-Allan Visiting Endowed Chair at Seattle University; the University of Kansas 2016 Woman of Distinction award; the 2013 Scholar of the Century award from the University of Northern Colorado; the 2011 TED-Merrill award for leadership in special education teacher education in 2011; and the UNESCO Chair in Inclusive International Research. I co-lead the World Education Research Association International Research Network on Student Voice for Promoting Equity and Inclusion in Schools along with Professor Kyriaki Messiou of the University of South Hampton, UK.

    A number of my articles focus on the design and development of teacher education programs that involve extensive clinical practice in general education settings. I have led the development of such programs in three universities, and continue to do research and development work in teacher education. I have also offered technical assistance as well as conducted research on the impact of technical assistance on individuals, as well as local, state, and national systems in the U.S. and abroad.

    I have received funding for more than $35 million in federal, state, and local grants. I serve on the Board of Editors for the book series Inclusive Education and Partnerships, an international book series produced by Deep University. Recent books include Ability, Equity, and Culture (with co-author Kathleen King Thorius) published by Teachers College Press in ‘14 and Equity on Five Continents (with Alfredo Artiles and Federico Waitoller) published in ‘11 by Harvard Education Press.

  • David Labaree

    David Labaree

    Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMost Recent Book:

    My new book – A Perfect Mess: The Unlikely Ascendancy of American Higher Education – is an essay about the nature of the American system of higher education. American higher education is an anomaly. In the second half of the 20th century it surged past its European forebears to become the dominant system in the world – with more money, influence, Nobel prizes, and drawing power than any of the systems that served as its models. By all rights, this never should have happened. Its origins were remarkably humble, arising from a loose assortment of parochial 19th century liberal arts colleges, which emerged in the pursuit of sectarian expansion and civic boosterism more than scholarly distinction. It was not even a system in the usual sense of the word, since it emerged with no plan, no planner, no prospects, and no reliable source of support. Yet these weaknesses of the American system in the 19th century turned out to be strengths in the 20th. From the difficult circumstances of trying to survive in an environment with a weak state, a divided church, and intense competition with peer institutions, American colleges developed into a system of higher education that was lean, adaptable, consumer-sensitive, self-supporting, and radically decentralized. This put the system in a strong position to expand and prosper when, before the turn of the century, it finally got what it was most grievously lacking: academic credibility (which came when it adopted elements of the German research university) and large student enrollments (which came when middle class families started to see social advantage in sending their children to college).

    This system is extraordinarily complex, bringing together contradictory educational goals, a broad array political constituencies, diverse sources of funds, and multiple forms of authority into a single institutional arena characterized by creative tension and local autonomy. One tension is between the influence of the market and the influence of the state. Another arises from the conflict among three social-political visions of higher education – as undergraduate college (populist), graduate school (elite), and land grant college (practical). A third arises from the way the system combines three alternative modes of authority – traditional, rational, and charismatic. In combination, these elements promote organizational complexity, radical stratification, broad political and financial support, partial autonomy, and adaptive entrepreneurial behavior.

  • Teresa LaFromboise

    Teresa LaFromboise

    Professor of Education
    On Leave from 09/01/2023 To 04/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBicultural competence and resilience in ethnic minority adolescent development. Particularly, the influence of enculturation and acculturation experiences on adolescent development. Cultural considerations in individual, school and community-based psychological interventions with adolescents and emerging adults.

  • Victor R. Lee

    Victor R. Lee

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAI literacy, data literacy, quantified self, maker education, conceptual change in science, elementary computer science education

  • Christopher J. Lemons

    Christopher J. Lemons

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioChristopher J. Lemons, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Special Education in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. His research focuses on improving academic outcomes for children and adolescents with intellectual, developmental, and learning disabilities. His recent research has focused on developing and evaluating reading interventions for individuals with Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. His areas of expertise include reading interventions for children and adolescents with learning and intellectual disabilities, data-based individualization, and intervention-related assessment and professional development. Lemons has secured funding to support his research from the Institute of Education Sciences and the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, both within the U.S. Department of Education and from the National Institutes of Health. Lemons is a Senior Advisor of the National Center on Intensive Intervention and the Progress Center, both within American Institutes of Research (AIR) in Washington, DC. He also chairs the Executive Committee of the Pacific Coast Research Conference (PCRC) and serves as the President-Elect of the Council for Exceptional Children’s Division of Research Lemons is a recipient of the Pueschel-Tjossem Research Award from the National Down Syndrome Congress and the Distinguished Early Career Research Award from the Council for Exceptional Children’s Division for Research. In 2016, Lemons received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers, from President Obama. Prior to entering academia, Lemons taught in several special education settings including a preschool autism unit, an elementary resource and inclusion program, and a middle school life skills classroom.

  • Emily Jane Levine

    Emily Jane Levine

    Associate Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of History

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research topics include a genealogy of academic concepts; the contemporary consequences of Germany and America’s divergent paths in knowledge organization; Jews and private philanthropy for scholarship; the historical tension between knowledge-for-its-own sake and applied knowledge; the global transfer of the kindergarten, mass schooling, and higher education; and the history and future of institutional innovation.

  • Sarah Levine

    Sarah Levine

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioMy research focuses on the teaching and learning of literary interpretation and writing in under-resourced urban high schools, with an emphasis on the links between in- and out-of-school interpretive practices. I am also interested in ways that AI and digital media (for example, natural language processing models like ChatGPT; visual representations of text like word clouds; and radio production) can be used as frameworks for teaching reading and writing to middle and high school students. Before pursuing an academic career, I taught secondary English at a Chicago public school for ten years. While there, I founded and ran a youth radio program that used digital audio production as a tool to help make writing and analysis relevant and real-world for students, and to build bridges between in- and out-of-school worlds.

  • Guilherme Lichand

    Guilherme Lichand

    Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Education

    BioGuilherme is proudly Brazilian. His research focuses on sources of educational inequities in the global South and on solutions with the potential to overturn them. He holds a PhD in Political Economy and Government from Harvard University. He was previously the UNICEF Professor of Child Well-being and Development at the University of Zurich. Guilherme is also a co-founder of Brazilian EdTech Movva, a student success management system supporting vulnerable students graduate college. He was acknowledged by the Schwab Foundation as top-10 Brazilian social entrepreneur in 2020 (post-Covid legacy) and by MIT Technology Review as the top under-35 Brazilian innovator in 2014. His research has been published in numerous scientific journals, including Nature Human Behavior, and campaigns featuring his work won multiple awards, including at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

  • Ira Lit

    Ira Lit

    Professor (Teaching) of Education

    BioResearch and practice focuses on teacher education, elementary education, educational equity, and the design and purpose of education and schooling, as well as the exploration of the educational experience of students often marginalized by the school context.

  • Sihong Liu

    Sihong Liu

    Research Associate

    BioDr. Sihong Liu is a Social Science Research Scholar at Stanford Center on Early Childhood (SCEC) in the Graduate School of Education. Dr. Liu obtained her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Science at the University of Georgia in 2020, and a B.S. in Statistics from Renmin University of China in 2015. Her research focuses on investigating the developmental processes of risk and resilience among children and adolescents exposed to early life stress, with the ultimate goal of directly developing intervention programs and influencing social policies

    Dr. Liu adopts various research perspectives and methodologies in her research investigation. One particular research area of her work examines the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that connect early experiences to youth's behavioral outcomes, where she employs neuroimaging, electrocardiogram, and neuroendocrine stress response assessments to study the multi-level neurobiological processes. In line with the neurobiological focus, her recent work specifically examines how unpredictability in early experiences affect child socioemotional and cognitive development as well as the neural and stress response underpinnings of these effects.

    Currently, Dr. Liu is also actively involved in the ongoing RAPID project, a large national survey platform that uses frequent, brief, online surveys to assess essential needs from families and child care providers and provide actionable data to key stakeholders to inform policy and program decisions. As the methodologist of the RAPID project, Dr. Liu works with partners from local communities, advocacy groups, and academic institutions and leverages both quantitative and qualitative analytical strategies to transform parents' and child care providers voices into actionable practices.

  • Susanna Loeb

    Susanna Loeb

    Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioSusanna Loeb is a Professor at the Graduate School of Education. She was Director of the Annenberg Institute at Brown University, where she was also Professor of Education and of International and Public Affairs and the founder and acting executive director of the National Student Support Accelerator, which aims to expand access to relationship-based, high-impact tutoring in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Susanna’s research focuses broadly on education policy and its role in improving educational opportunities for students. Her work has addressed issues of educator career choices and professional development, of school finance and governance, and of early childhood systems. Before moving to Brown, Susanna was the Barnett Family Professor of Education at Stanford. She was the founding director of the Center for Education Policy at Stanford and co-director of Policy Analysis for California Education. Susanna led the research for both Getting Down to Facts projects for California schools. In 2020, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also an affiliate at NBER and JPAL and a member of the National Academy of Education.

  • Rachel Lotan

    Rachel Lotan

    Professor (Teaching) of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEquitable teaching and learning in heterogeneous classrooms; Teaching as a profession in international contexts, Curriculum development.

  • Prashant Loyalka

    Prashant Loyalka

    Associate Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrashant's research focuses on examining/addressing inequalities in the education of youth and on understanding/improving the quality of education received by youth in a number of countries including China, India, Russia, and the United States. In the course of addressing educational inequalities, Prashant examines the consequences of tracking, financial and informational constraints, as well as social and psychological factors in highly competitive education systems. His work on understanding educational quality is built around research that assesses and compares student learning in higher education, high school and compulsory schooling. He furthermore conducts large-scale evaluations of educational programs and policies that seek to improve student outcomes.

  • Ramon Martinez

    Ramon Martinez

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioRamón Antonio Martínez is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. His research explores the intersections of language, race, and ideology in K-12 public schools, with a particular focus on literacy learning among multilingual children and youth, and the preparation of teachers to work in multilingual settings. In addition to his long-term, community-engaged, and ethnographically informed research, Dr. Martínez actively supports pre-service teachers through his ongoing work in the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP). His scholarship has been published in journals such as Anthropology & Education Quarterly, International Multilingual Research Journal, Language Policy, Linguistics and Education, Modern Language Journal, Research in the Teaching of English, and Review of Research in Education. Dr. Martínez earned his Ph.D. from the Division of Urban Schooling in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  • Raymond McDermott

    Raymond McDermott

    Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInteraction analysis and social structure; the political economy of learning; writing systems; educational and psychological anthropology.

  • Daniel McFarland

    Daniel McFarland

    Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe majority of my current research projects concern the sociology of science and research innovation. Here are some examples of projects we are pursuing:
    1. the process of intellectual jurisdiction across fields and disciplines
    2. the process of knowledge innovation diffusion in science
    3. the propagators of scientific careers and advance
    4. the role of identity and diversity on the process of knowledge diffusion and career advance
    5. the process of research translation across scientific fields and into practice
    6. the formal properties and mechanisms of ideational change (network analysis, or holistic conceptions of scientific propositions and ideas)
    7. developing methods for identifying the rediscovery of old ideas recast anew
    8. investigating the process of scientific review

    I am also heavily involved in research on social networks and social network theory development. Some of my work concerns relational dynamics and cognitive networks as represented in communication. This often concerns the communication of children (in their writings and speech in classrooms) and academic scholars. I am also co-editing a special issue in Social Networks on "network ecology", and I am a coauthor on a social network methods textbook coming out with Cambridge Press (Forthcoming, by Craig Rawlings, Jeff Smith, James Moody and Daniel McFarland).

    Last, I am heavily involved in institutional efforts to develop computational social science, computational sociology, and education data science on Stanford's campus.

  • Milbrey McLaughlin

    Milbrey McLaughlin

    David Jacks Professor of Higher Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSchool context; planned change; teacher workplaces; government policy; inner-city youth; neighborhood-based organizations; community youth development.

  • Vinod Menon

    Vinod Menon

    Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Education and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEXPERIMENTAL, CLINICAL AND THEORETICAL SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

    Cognitive neuroscience; Systems neuroscience; Cognitive development; Psychiatric neuroscience; Functional brain imaging; Dynamical basis of brain function; Nonlinear dynamics of neural systems.

  • John Mitchell

    John Mitchell

    Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProgramming languages, computer security and privacy, blockchain, machine learning, and technology for education

  • Jelena Obradović

    Jelena Obradović

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdaptation, resilience, and developmental psychopathology of disadvantaged children populations; Stress reactivity and biological sensitivity to contextual influences; Executive function and self-regulatory abilities; Effects of risk, adversity, and social status on children’s development.

  • Jonathan Osborne

    Jonathan Osborne

    Kamalachari Professor of Science Education, Emeritus

    BioMy research focus is a mix of work on policy and pedagogy in the teaching and learning of science. In the policy domain, I am interested in exploring students' attitudes to science and how school science can be made more worthwhile and engaging - particularly for those who will not continue with the study of science. In pedagogy, my focus has been on making the case for the role of argumentation in science education both as a means of improving the use of a more dialogic approach to teaching science and improving student understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. I have worked on four major projects in argumentation. The first from 1999-2002 was on 'Enhancing the Quality of Argument in School Science Education'. From this we developed the IDEAS (Ideas, Evidence and Argument in Science Education) materials to support teacher professional learning funded by the Nuffield Foundation. From 2007-2010 I was co-PI on the project 'Learning to Teach Ideas, Evidence and Argument in School Science' which explored how to build teachers competency with the use of this pedagogy in four schools. Most recently, I have worked with Mark Wilson of UCB on a project to develop and test a learning progression for Argumentation in science. Some of this work can be found on the website:

    http://scientificargumentation.stanford.edu/

    My other area of interest in pedagogy is the teaching of reading and the facilitation of discussion. I have published a book entitled 'Language and Literacy in Science Education' and we are just completing a five year IES funded project - 'Catalyzing Comprehension through Discussion and Debate' exploring how we can support the teaching of reading in science. We have developed a web site with some of our materials:

    http://serpmedia.org/rtl/

    And a MOOC called 'Reading to Learn in Science" which is offered by NovoEd and will be run again from Jan 13, 2016 for 12 weeks.

    Finally, much science, if not more, is learned outside the classroom and how young people learn in that environment and what it has to offer formal education is another focus of my work and I was one of the partners in the NSF funded Centre for Informal Learning and Schools (2002-7) and have several publications in this field.

  • Brad Osgood

    Brad Osgood

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, in Education
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioOsgood is a mathematician by training and applies techniques from analysis and geometry to various engineering problems. He is interested in problems in imaging, pattern recognition, and signal processing.

  • Amado Padilla

    Amado Padilla

    Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include: (a) the development of models of ethnic identity that incorporate social cognition theory and social identity; (b)acculturation stress and mental health status across three generations of Latinos; (c) home, school and community protective factors that empower Latino students to succeed academically; (d) learning of Mandarin by high school students in summer intensive programs vs. students in regular high school world language classes; and (e) student language and academic content learning in a Mandarin/English dual language immersion program.

  • Eujin Park

    Eujin Park

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioDr. Park is an Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Dr. Park draws upon Critical Race Theory, Asian American Studies, and community engaged research to examine how Asian American families negotiate with race in and through educational institutions. She recently conducted an ethnographic investigation of community-based educational spaces in the Chicago-area Asian American community, which highlighted the role of community spaces in youths’ educational experiences and understandings of racializing discourses. In addition to publishing and presenting her work in multiple academic venues, Dr. Park draws upon her research in her work with Asian American and other youth of color in community-based organizations. She earned her Ph.D. in Educational Policy Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a concentration in Social Sciences and a Minor in Qualitative Methods. She also holds an M.A. from UW-Madison and a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Prior to joining the faculty, Dr. Park was an IDEAL Provostial Fellow, part of the inaugural cohort of early-career scholars of race and ethnicity at Stanford University. Prior to that, she was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy (IRRPP) at the University of Illinois-Chicago.

  • Roy Pea

    Roy Pea

    Director, H-STAR, David Jacks Professor of Education and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestslearning sciences focus on advancing theories, research, tools and social practices of technology-enhanced learning of complex domains

  • Francis Pearman

    Francis Pearman

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioFrancis A. Pearman is an Assistant Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. His research focuses on how poverty and inequality shape the life chances of children, especially in rapidly changing cities. Pearman holds a Ph.D. and M.Ed. from Vanderbilt University and a B.S. from the University of Virginia.

  • David Plank

    David Plank

    Professor (Research) of Education, Emeritus

    BioDavid Plank is Co-Director of the Lemann Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Brazilian Education. He served as Executive Director of Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE) for 11 years, retiring in 2018. Before joining PACE Plank was a Professor at Michigan State University, where he founded and directed the Education Policy Center. He was previously on the faculties at the University of Pittsburgh and at the University of Texas at Dallas, where he taught courses and conducted research in the areas of educational finance and policy. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1983. Plank is the author or editor of six books, including the AERA Handbook of Education Policy Research. He has published widely in a number of different fields, including economics of education, history of education, and educational policy. His current interests include the role of the State in education, and the relationship between academic research and public policy. In addition to his work in the United States, Plank has served as a consultant to international organizations including the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the United States Agency for International Development, the Ford Foundation, and also to governments in Africa and Latin America.

  • Denise Pope

    Denise Pope

    Senior Lecturer in Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Pope is co-founder of Challenge Success, a research and intervention project that aims to reduce unhealthy pressure on youth and champions a broader vision of youth success. Challenge Success is an expanded version of the SOS: Stressed-Out Students project that Dr. Pope founded and directed from 2003-2008. She lectures nationally on parenting techniques and pedagogical strategies to increase student well-being, engagement with learning, and integrity.

  • Ann Porteus

    Ann Porteus

    Senior Lecturer in Education

    BioNo research activity. Interests in interpersonal/group dynamics, team building, leadership development, and multicultural education.

  • Walter W. Powell

    Walter W. Powell

    Jacks Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Communication, of Sociology and of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlease go to my webpage for more info on research:
    https://woodypowell.com

  • Francisco Ramirez

    Francisco Ramirez

    Vida Jacks Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlobalization and impact of human rights regime;rise of human rights education and analysis of civics, history, and social studies textbooks; transformations in the status of women in society and in higher education; universities as institutions and organizations;education, science and development

  • sean reardon

    sean reardon

    Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology
    On Leave from 01/01/2024 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe causes and patterns of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic achievement disparities;

    The effects of school integration policies on segregation patterns and educational outcomes;

    Income inequality and its educational and social consequences.

    http://cepa.stanford.edu/sean-reardon

  • Byron Reeves

    Byron Reeves

    Paul C. Edwards Professor of Communication, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioByron Reeves, PhD, is the Paul C. Edwards Professor of Communication at Stanford and
    Professor (by courtesy) in the Stanford School of Education. Byron has a long history of
    experimental research on the psychological processing of media, and resulting responses and
    effects. He has studied how media influence attention, memory and emotional responses and has
    applied the research in the areas of speech dialogue systems, interactive games, advanced
    displays, social robots, and autonomous cars. Byron has recently launched (with Stanford
    colleagues Nilam Ram and Thomas Robinson) the Human Screenome Project (Nature, 2020),
    designed to collect moment-by-moment changes in technology use across applications, platforms
    and screens.

    At Stanford, Byron has been Director of the Center for the Study of Language and Information,
    and Co-Director of the H-STAR Institute (Human Sciences and Technologies Advanced
    Research), and he was the founding Director of mediaX at Stanford, a university-industry
    program launched in 2001 to facilitate discussion and research at the intersection of academic
    and applied interests. Byron has worked at Microsoft Research and with several technology
    startups, and has been involved with media policy at the FTC, FCC, US Congress and White
    House. He is an elected Fellow of the International Communication Association, and recipient of ICA Fellows book award for The Media Equation (with Prof. Clifford Nass), and the Novim Foundation Epiphany Science and Society Award. Byron’s PhD in Communication is from Michigan State University.

  • Rob Reich

    Rob Reich

    McGregor-Girand Professor of Social Ethics of Science and Technology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI. Professor, by courtesy, of Education, of Philosophy and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at FSI
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioRob Reich is professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy and at the Graduate School of Education. He is a co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (publisher of the Stanford Social Innovation Review), and associate director of the Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. He was faculty director at the Center for Ethics in Society for eight years, and he continues to lead its ethics and technology initiatives.

    His scholarship in political theory engages with the work of social scientists and engineers. His newest work is on ethics and AI. His most recent books are System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot (with Mehran Sahami and Jeremy M. Weinstein, HarperCollins 2021) and Digital Technology and Democratic Theory (edited with Lucy Bernholz and Hélène Landemore, University of Chicago Press 2021). He has also written widely about philanthropy, including Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better (Princeton University Press, 2018) and Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values (edited with Chiara Cordelli and Lucy Bernholz, University of Chicago Press, 2016). His early work is focused on democracy and education, including Bridging Liberalism and Multiculturalism in American Education (University of Chicago Press, 2002) and Education, Justice, and Democracy (edited with Danielle Allen, University of Chicago Press, 2013). He has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, Wired, The Guardian, and the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

    Rob is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores award, Stanford’s highest honor for teaching. He was a sixth grade teacher at Rusk Elementary School in Houston, Texas before attending graduate school. He is a board member of the magazine Boston Review, of Giving Tuesday, and at the Spencer Foundation.