Graduate School of Education


Showing 11-20 of 529 Results

  • Joseph Willie Devail Anderson Jr.

    Joseph Willie Devail Anderson Jr.

    Master of Arts Student in Education, admitted Winter 2020
    Arts-based Diversion Program Coordinator, Ctr for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE)

    Current Role at StanfordFirst-year Master's Student in Stanford's Graduate School of Education

    Project Coordinator for the Stanford Art's Based Diversion Program

    President of Stooty Technologies

  • Subini Ancy Annamma

    Subini Ancy Annamma

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioPrior to her doctoral studies, Subini Ancy Annamma was a special education teacher in both public schools and youth prisons. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Her research critically examines the ways students are criminalized and resist that criminalization through the mutually constitutive nature of racism and ableism, how they interlock with other marginalizing oppressions, and how these intersections impact youth education trajectories in urban schools and youth prisons. Further, she positions students as knowledge generators, exploring how their narratives can inform teacher and special education. Dr. Annamma’s book, The Pedagogy of Pathologization (Routledge, 2018) focuses on the education trajectories of incarcerated disabled girls of color and has won the 2019 AESA Critic’s Choice Book Award & 2018 NWSA Alison Piepmeier Book Prize. Dr. Annamma is a past Ford Postdoctoral Fellow, AERA Division G Early Career Awardee, Critical Race Studies in Education Associate Emerging Scholar recipient, Western Social Science Association's Outstanding Emerging Scholar, and AERA Minority Dissertation Awardee. Dr. Annamma’s work has been published in scholarly journals such as Educational Researcher, Teachers College Record, Review of Research in Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Theory Into Practice, Race Ethnicity and Education, Qualitative Inquiry, among others.

  • anthony lising antonio

    anthony lising antonio

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransitions to postsecondary education; racial, ethnic, and religious minority college student development.

  • Nicole Ardoin

    Nicole Ardoin

    Director, E-IPER, Associate Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCommunity Involvement
    Community/Youth Development and Organizations
    Diversity
    Environmental Education
    Ethnography
    Evaluation
    Organizations
    Qualitative Research Methods

  • Emma Armstrong-Carter

    Emma Armstrong-Carter

    Ph.D. Student in Education, admitted Autumn 2018
    Other Tech - Graduate, GSE Dean's Office Operations

    BioMy research program lies at the intersection of education policy and early childhood development.

    I research (1) family processes which impact young children’s learning and wellbeing (2) how to improve children’s learning and wellbeing when they are experiencing daily challenges at home such as family disability, family illness, or difficult relationships. My research informs the design of school- and government-based policies that support young children’s educational success.

    Beginning in the Summer of 2021, I will be entering the academic job market for assistant professor positions at research universities. If you are interested in my work, please contact me at emmaac@stanford.edu!

  • Alfredo J. Artiles

    Alfredo J. Artiles

    Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education

    BioDr. Artiles is Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education. His programmatic work engages the questions “how do educational equity remedies create new injustices and what are effective ways to reduce these paradoxes?” His scholarship examines the dual nature of disability as an object of protection and a tool of stratification. More specifically, he aims to understand how responses to disability intersections with race, social class and language advance or hinder educational opportunities for disparate groups of students. For instance, he is studying the cultural-historical contexts of racial disparities in special education and whether a disability diagnosis is associated with differential consequences for minoritized groups (e.g., segregation, quality and type of services). He and his colleagues have led national and regional technical assistance initiatives at the state and school district levels to address these equity paradoxes. Current research projects include:

    * Examining the role of sociocultural influences (e.g., histories of racial inequities in communities and schools) in educators’ interpretations and responses to chronic school district citations for racial disparities in special education.
    * Mapping the changing meanings of “disability” and “inclusive education” and the ways in which disability-race intersections appear and disappear across identification policies, practices and settings at the district and school levels.
    * Piloting a participatory model with youth of color with/without disabilities grounded in the arts and humanities to (re)structure school discipline policies and practices.
    * Documenting teachers’ struggles with the second language-learning disability dilemma during instructional processes prior to referring dual language learners to special education.
    * Analyzing equity consequences of inclusive education implementation in Global South nations.

    Dr. Artiles is Honorary Professor at the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) and received an honorary doctorate from the University of Göteborgs (Sweden). He served on the Obama White House Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. Dr. Artiles received mentoring awards from The Spencer Foundation, the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and Arizona State University. Artiles is an elected member of the National Academy of Education and Fellow of AERA, the Learning Policy Institute and the National Education Policy Center. He was a resident fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. The 2011 article based on his Wallace Lecture, “Toward an interdisciplinary understanding of educational equity and difference: The case of the racialization of ability” received AERA’s Palmer O. Johnson Award. His paper “Objects of protection, enduring nodes of difference: Disability intersections with “other” differences, 1916 – 2016” (with S. Dorn & A. Bal) won the 2017 AERA Review of Research Award.