Bio-X


Showing 1-40 of 40 Results

  • Alice C. Fan

    Alice C. Fan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fan is a physician scientist who studies how turning off oncogenes (cancer genes) can cause tumor regression in preclinical and clinical translational studies. Based on her findings, she has initiated clinical trials studying how targeted therapies affect cancer signals in kidney cancer and low grade lymphoma. In the laboratory, she uses new nanotechnology strategies for tumor diagnosis and treatment to define biomarkers for personalized therapy.

  • Jonathan Fan

    Jonathan Fan

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in designing and engineering new nanoplasmonic platforms, including those fabricated by top-down and bottom-up processes, for the purposes of developing new sensors, beam steering platforms, active on-chip optical components, and modulators. We are also interested in exploring new material platforms, utilizing stretchable and thin-film materials, that integrate optical and electronic functionality for the purposes of realizing new body-worn and bio-medical devices.

  • Shanhui Fan

    Shanhui Fan

    Director, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioFan's research involves the theory and simulations of photonic and solid-state materials and devices; photonic crystals; nano-scale photonic devices and plasmonics; quantum optics; computational electromagnetics; parallel scientific computing.

  • C. Garrison Fathman

    C. Garrison Fathman

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control regulatory T cell (Treg) responsiveness by inhibiting the Treg IL-2 receptor desensitization. We have characterized a gene (Deaf1) that plays a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D. Using PBC gene expression, we have provisionally identified a signature of risk and progression in T1D.

  • Michael Fayer

    Michael Fayer

    David Mulvane Ehrsam and Edward Curtis Franklin Professor in Chemistry

    BioMy research group studies complex molecular systems by using ultrafast multi-dimensional infrared and non-linear UV/Vis methods. A basic theme is to understand the role of mesoscopic structure on the properties of molecular systems. Many systems have structure on length scales large compare to molecules but small compared to macroscopic dimensions. The mesoscopic structures occur on distance scales of a few nanometers to a few tens of nanometers. The properties of systems, such as water in nanoscopic environments, room temperature ionic liquids, functionalized surfaces, liquid crystals, metal organic frameworks, water and other liquids in nanoporous silica, polyelectrolyte fuel cell membranes, vesicles, and micelles depend on molecular level dynamics and intermolecular interactions. Our ultrafast measurements provide direct observables for understanding the relationships among dynamics, structure, and intermolecular interactions.

    Bulk properties are frequently a very poor guide to understanding the molecular level details that determine the nature of a chemical process and its dynamics. Because molecules are small, molecular motions are inherently very fast. Recent advances in methodology developed in our labs make it possible for us to observe important processes as they occur. These measurements act like stop-action photography. To focus on a particular aspect of a time evolving system, we employ sequences of ultrashort pulses of light as the basis for non-linear methods such as ultrafast infrared two dimensional vibrational echoes, optical Kerr effect methods, and ultrafast IR transient absorption experiments.

    We are using ultrafast 2D IR vibrational echo spectroscopy and other multi-dimensional IR methods, which we have pioneered, to study dynamics of molecular complexes, water confined on nm lengths scales with a variety of topographies, molecules bound to surfaces, ionic liquids, and materials such as metal organic frameworks and porous silica. We can probe the dynamic structures these systems. The methods are somewhat akin to multidimensional NMR, but they probe molecular structural evolution in real time on the relevant fast time scales, eight to ten orders of magnitude faster than NMR. We are obtaining direct information on how nanoscopic confinement of water changes its properties, a topic of great importance in chemistry, biology, geology, and materials. For the first time, we are observing the motions of molecular bound to surfaces. In biological membranes, we are using the vibrational echo methods to study dynamics and the relationship among dynamics, structure, and function. We are also developing and applying theory to these problems frequently in collaboration with top theoreticians.

    We are studying dynamics in complex liquids, in particular room temperature ionic liquids, liquid crystals, supercooled liquids, as well as in influence of small quantities of water on liquid dynamics. Using ultrafast optical heterodyne detected optical Kerr effect methods, we can follow processes from tens of femtoseconds to ten microseconds. Our ability to look over such a wide range of time scales is unprecedented. The change in molecular dynamics when a system undergoes a phase change is of fundamental and practical importance. We are developing detailed theory as the companion to the experiments.

    We are studying photo-induced proton transfer in nanoscopic water environments such as polyelectrolyte fuel cell membranes, using ultrafast UV/Vis fluorescence and multidimensional IR measurements to understand the proton transfer and other processes and how they are influenced by nanoscopic confinement. We want to understand the role of the solvent and the systems topology on proton transfer dynamics.

  • Ron Fedkiw

    Ron Fedkiw

    Professor of Computer Science

    BioFedkiw's research is focused on the design of new computational algorithms for a variety of applications including computational fluid dynamics, computer graphics, and biomechanics.

  • Carl Feinstein

    Carl Feinstein

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAutism and Asperger's Disorder.

    Genetically-based neurodevelopmental disorder, including Velocardiofacial Syndrome, Smith-Magenis Syndrome, Williams Syndrome, and Fragile X Syndrome.

    Intellectual Disability (mental retardation) and psychiatric disorders.

    Developmental Language Disorder and Learning Disabilities.

    Sensory impairment in children, including visual and hearing impairment.

    Psychiatric aspects of medical illness and disability in children.

  • Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Dunlevie Family Professor of Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include (1) computer simulation and modeling of cardiovascular physiology with specific attention paid to congenital heart disease and its treatment, (2) the evaluation and treatment of pulmonary hypertension/pulmonary vascular diseases, and (3) development and testing of medical devices/therapies for the treatment of congenital heart disease and pulmonary vascular diseases.

  • Jessica Feldman

    Jessica Feldman

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in understanding design principles within cells that contribute to the diversification of cellular form and function. Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and live imaging approaches, we are investigating how the microtubule cytoskeleton is spatially organized and the mechanisms underlying organizational changes during development.

  • Marcus Feldman

    Marcus Feldman

    Burnet C. and Mildred Finley Wohlford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman genetic and cultural evolution, mathematical biology, demography of China

  • Dean W. Felsher

    Dean W. Felsher

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory investigates how oncogenes initiate and sustain tumorigenesis. I have developed model systems whereby I can conditionally activate oncogenes in normal human and mouse cells in tissue culture or in specific tissues of transgenic mice. In particular using the tetracycline regulatory system, I have generated a conditional model system for MYC-induced tumors. I have shown that cancers caused by the conditional over-expression of the MYC proto-oncogene regress with its inactivation.

  • Stephen Felt, DVM, MPH

    Stephen Felt, DVM, MPH

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis research interests include infectious diseases, particularly zoonoses, and exploring techniques which promote the health and welfare of laboratory animals.

  • Liang Feng

    Liang Feng

    Assistant Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in the structure, dynamics and function of eukaryotic transport proteins mediating ions and major nutrients crossing the membrane, the kinetics and regulation of transport processes, the catalytic mechanism of membrane embedded enzymes and the development of small molecule modulators based on the structure and function of membrane proteins.

  • Russell D. Fernald

    Russell D. Fernald

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn the course of evolution,two of the strongest selective forces in nature,light and sex, have left their mark on living organisms. I am interested in how the development and function of the nervous system reflects these events. We use the reproductive system to understand how social behavior influences the main system of reproductive action controlled by a collection of cells in the brain containing gonodotropin releasing hormone(GnRH)

  • Katherine Ferrara

    Katherine Ferrara

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    BioKatherine Whittaker Ferrara is a Professor of Radiology. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the IEEE, American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Biomedical Engineering Society, the Acoustical Society of America and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. Dr. Ferrara received her Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of California, Davis. Prior to her PhD, Dr. Ferrara was a project engineer for General Electric Medical Systems, involved in the development of early magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound systems. Following an appointment as an Associate Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Dr. Ferrara served as the founding chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at UC Davis. Her laboratory is known for early work in aspects of ultrasonics and has more recently expanded their focus to broadly investigate molecular imaging and drug delivery.

  • James Ferrell

    James Ferrell

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab has two main goals: to understand the regulation of mitosis and to understand the systems-level logic of simple signaling circuits. We often make use of Xenopus laevis oocytes, eggs, and cell-free extracts for both sorts of study. We also carry out single-cell fluorescence imaging studies on mammalian cell lines. Our experimental work is complemented by computational and theoretical studies aimed at understanding the design principles and recurring themes of regulatory circuits.

  • David Fiorentino, MD, PhD

    David Fiorentino, MD, PhD

    Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in all types of immune-mediated skin disease, with a focus on psoriasis and rheumatic skin disease. I co-direct a multi-disciplinary clinic dedicated to the care of patients with rheumatic skin diseases, such as lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, dermatyositis and scleroderma. I conduct multiple clinical trials and I participate in translational research with tissues obtained from a prospective cohort of patients with scleroderma, lupus, and dermatomyositis.

  • Andrew Fire

    Andrew Fire

    George D. Smith Professor in Molecular and Genetic Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study natural cellular mechanisms for adapting to genetic change. These include systems activated during normal development and those for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. Underlying these studies are questions of how a cells can distinguish information as "self" versus "nonself" or "wanted" versus "unwanted".

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    BioMichael Fischbach is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at Stanford University and a member of Stanford ChEM-H. Fischbach is a recipient of the NIH Director's Pioneer and New Innovator Awards, an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholars Award, a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, a Medical Research Award from the W.M. Keck Foundation, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease award, and a Glenn Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging. His laboratory uses a combination of genomics and chemistry to identify and characterize small molecules from microbes, with an emphasis on the human microbiome. Fischbach received his Ph.D. as a John and Fannie Hertz Foundation Fellow in chemistry from Harvard in 2007, where he studied the role of iron acquisition in bacterial pathogenesis and the biosynthesis of antibiotics. Before coming to UCSF, he spent two years as an independent fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital coordinating a collaborative effort based at the Broad Institute to develop genomics-based approaches to the discovery of small molecules from microbes. Fischbach is a member of the board of directors of Achaogen, the scientific advisory boards of NGM Biopharmaceuticals, Cell Design Labs, and Indigo Agriculture, and is a co-founder of Revolution Medicines.

  • Daniel Fisher

    Daniel Fisher

    David Starr Jordan Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvolutionary & ecological dynamics & diversity, microbial, expt'l, & cancer

  • Dominik Fleischmann

    Dominik Fleischmann

    Professor of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNon-invasive Cardiovascular Imaging
    Image Post-processing
    Contrast Medium Dynamics

  • Sean Follmer

    Sean Follmer

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman Computer Interaction, Haptics, Robotics, Human Centered Design

  • James Ford

    James Ford

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMammalian DNA repair and DNA damage inducible responses; p53 tumor suppressor gene; transcription in nucleotide excision repair and mutagenesis; genetic determinants of cancer cell sensitivity to DNA damage; genetics of inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes and human GI malignancies; clinical cancer genetics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer and mismatch repair deficient colon cancer.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on two main areas: using microfluidic tools we have already developed to build ground-up quantitative models of how gene expression is regulated, and developing new tools to explore protein-protein interactions.

  • Michael B. Fowler, MB, FRCP

    Michael B. Fowler, MB, FRCP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdrenergic nervous system; beta-adrenergic function in, heart failure; drugs in heart failure.

  • Paige Fox

    Paige Fox

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    BioDr. Paige Fox is Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who specialized in hand surgery, reconstructive microsurgery, as well as peripheral nerve and brachial plexus surgery. She is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive surgery in the Department of Surgery. She works with adult and pediatric patients. Her research focuses on wound healing, disorders of the upper extremity, and surgical biosensors.

  • Christopher Francis

    Christopher Francis

    Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMicrobial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and metals in the environment; molecular geomicrobiology; marine microbiology; microbial diversity

  • Curtis Frank

    Curtis Frank

    W. M. Keck, Sr. Professor in Engineering and Professor, by court, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioThe properties of ultrathin polymer films are often different from their bulk counterparts. We use spin casting, Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and surface grafting to fabricate ultrathin films in the range of 100 to 1000 Angstroms thick. Macromolecular amphiphiles are examined at the air-water interface by surface pressure, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial shear measurements and on solid substrates by atomic force microscopy, FTIR, and ellipsometry. A vapor-deposition-polymerization process has been developed for covalent grafting of poly(amino acids) from solid substrates. FTIR measurements permit study of secondary structures (right and left-handed alpha helices, parallel and anti-parallel beta sheets) as a function of temperature and environment.

    A broadly interdisciplinary collaboration has been established with the Department of Ophthalmology in the Stanford School of Medicine. We have designed and synthesized a fully interpenetrating network of two different hydrogel materials that have properties consistent with application as a substitute for the human cornea: high water swellability up to 85%,tensile strength comparable to the cornea, high glucose permeability comparable to the cornea, and sufficient tear strength to permit suturing. We have developed a technique for surface modification with adhesion peptides that allows binding of collagen and subsequent growth of epithelial cells. Broad questions on the relationships among molecular structure, processing protocol, and biomedical device application are being pursued.

  • Michael Frank

    Michael Frank

    David and Lucile Packard Foundation Professor in Human Biology and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Linguistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we learn to communicate using language? I study children's language learning and how it interacts with their developing understanding of the social world. I use behavioral experiments, computational tools, and novel measurement methods like large-scale web-based studies, eye-tracking, and head-mounted cameras.

  • Hunter Fraser

    Hunter Fraser

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the regulation and evolution of gene expression using a combination of experimental and computational approaches.

    Our work brings together quantitative genetics, genomics, epigenetics, and evolutionary biology to achieve a deeper understanding of how genetic variation within and between species affects genome-wide gene expression and ultimately shapes the phenotypic diversity of life.

  • Richard Lee Frock

    Richard Lee Frock

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms of DNA double-strand break repair and chromosomal translocations

  • Victor Froelicher, MD

    Victor Froelicher, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsScreening of athletes for sudden cardiac death, Computerized ECG and clinical data management; exercise Physiology including expired gas analysis; the effect of chronic and acute exercise on the heart; digital recording of biological signals; diagnostic use of exercise testing; development of Expert Medical System software and educational tools.

  • Wolf B. Frommer

    Wolf B. Frommer

    Professor (by Courtesy), Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWatching cells at work
    Focus: Transport / signaling across the plasma membrane (sugars, amino acids).
    Tools: FRET-based nanosensors for metabolite imaging (with subcellular resolution) in living organisms using confocal fluorescence microscopy and HTS; Sensor optimization by computational design; RNAi to modify cellular functions.
    Goals: Identify unknown sugar effluxers from liver/plant cells; study regulatory networks.
    Model systems: liver, neuronal, plant cell cultures, Arabidopsis, yeast

  • Judith Frydman

    Judith Frydman

    Donald Kennedy Chair in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long term goal of our research is to understand how proteins fold in living cells. My lab uses a multidisciplinary approach to address fundamental questions about molecular chaperones, protein folding and degradation. In addition to basic mechanistic principles, we aim to define how impairment of cellular folding and quality control are linked to disease, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases and examine whether reengineering chaperone networks can provide therapeutic strategies.

  • Takako Fujioka

    Takako Fujioka

    Associate Professor of Music

    BioResearch topics include neural oscillations for auditory perception, auditory-motor coupling, brain plasticity in development and aging, recovery from stroke with music-supported therapy, and re-learning of speech and music after cochlear implantation.

    Her post-doctoral and research-associate work at Rotman Research Institute in Toronto was supported by awards from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Her research continues to explore the biological nature of human musical ability by examining brain activities with non-invasive human neurophysiological measures such as magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG).

  • Gerald Fuller

    Gerald Fuller

    Fletcher Jones II Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioThe processing of complex liquids (polymers, suspensions, emulsions, biological fluids) alters their microstructure through orientation and deformation of their constitutive elements. In the case of polymeric liquids, it is of interest to obtain in situ measurements of segmental orientation and optical methods have proven to be an excellent means of acquiring this information. Research in our laboratory has resulted in a number of techniques in optical rheometry such as high-speed polarimetry (birefringence and dichroism) and various microscopy methods (fluorescence, phase contrast, and atomic force microscopy).

    The microstructure of polymeric and other complex materials also cause them to have interesting physical properties and respond to different flow conditions in unusual manners. In our laboratory, we are equipped with instruments that are able to characterize these materials such as shear rheometer, capillary break up extensional rheometer, and 2D extensional rheometer. Then, the response of these materials to different flow conditions can be visualized and analyzed in detail using high speed imaging devices at up to 2,000 frames per second.

    There are numerous processes encountered in nature and industry where the deformation of fluid-fluid interfaces is of central importance. Examples from nature include deformation of the red blood cell in small capillaries, cell division and structure and composition of the tear film. Industrial applications include the processing of emulsions and foams, and the atomization of droplets in ink-jet printing. In our laboratory, fundamental research is in progress to understand the orientation and deformation of monolayers at the molecular level. These experiments employ state of the art optical methods such as polarization modulated dichroism, fluorescence microscopy, and Brewster angle microscopy to obtain in situ measurements of polymer films and small molecule amphiphile monolayers subject to flow. Langmuir troughs are used as the experimental platform so that the thermodynamic state of the monolayers can be systematically controlled. For the first time, well characterized, homogeneous surface flows have been developed, and real time measurements of molecular and microdomain orientation have been obtained. These microstructural experiments are complemented by measurements of the macroscopic, mechanical properties of the films.

  • Margaret T. Fuller

    Margaret T. Fuller

    Reed-Hodgson Professor in Human Biology and Professor of Genetics and of Obstetrics/Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulation of self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation in adult stem cell lineages. Developmental tumor suppressor mechanisms and regulation of the switch from proliferation to differentiation. Cell type specific transcription machinery and regulation of cell differentiation. Developmental regulation of cell cycle progression during male meiosis.

  • Lawrence Fung

    Lawrence Fung

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fung is a child & adolescent psychiatrist with specialized clinical training in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and advanced research training in chemical engineering, neuropsychopharmacology, and neuroimaging. He has extensive work experience in pharmaceutical research and development, including the discovery and development of a GABA(A) receptor agonist for the treatment of insomnia and anxiety.

    Dr. Fung serves as a co-investigator and co-protocol director of a current randomized controlled trial of pregnenolone in children and adolescents with ASD. Dr. Fung is interested in elucidating the mechanisms of action of pregnenolone and its related neurosteroids in the treatment of individuals with ASD.

    In addition to pharmacologic treatment studies in ASD and other developmental disorders, he is also performing multimodal neuroimaging studies in these disorders. Dr. Fung employs state-of-the-art multimodal neuroimaging tools to study GABA neurophysiology in individuals with ASD, fragile X syndrome (FXS) and intellectual disability. He is the Principal Investigator of NIH-funded "GABAergic Neurophysiology in Autism Spectrum Disorder". He serves as a Co-investigator of "Cross-Species Multi-Modal Neuroimaging to Investigate GABA Physiology in Fragile X Syndrome".

    His overarching goal is to dissect the neurobiology of ASD using a combination of bioanalytical, immunochemical, and multimodal imaging techniques to identify biomarkers based on specific molecular mechanisms that will inform targeted treatments for ASD.