School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-50 of 66 Results

  • Laurence Baker

    Laurence Baker

    Bing Professor of Human Biology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Baker's research is in the area of health economics, and focuses on the effects of financial incentives, organizational structures, and government policies on the health care delivery system, health care costs, and health outcomes.

  • Eric Bettinger

    Eric Bettinger

    Conley DeAngelis Family Professor, Professor of Education, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEric's research interests include economics of education; student success and completion in college; the impacts of online education; the impacts of financial aid; teacher characteristics and student success in college; effects of voucher programs on both academic and non-academic outcomes. His research focuses on using rigorous statistical methods in identifying cause-and-effect relationships in higher education.

  • Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Professor of Health Policy, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Professor, by courtesy, of Economics and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute and the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the constraints that vulnerable populations face in making decisions that affect their health status, as well as the effects of government policies and programs designed to benefit vulnerable populations.

  • Michael Boskin

    Michael Boskin

    Tully Friedman Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioMichael J. Boskin is Tully M. Friedman Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is also Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research. He served as Chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) from 1989 to 1993. The independent Council for Excellence in Government rated Dr. Boskin’s CEA one of the five most respected agencies (out of one hundred) in the federal government. He chaired the highly influential blue-ribbon Commission on the Consumer Price Index, whose report has transformed the way government statistical agencies around the world measure inflation, GDP and productivity.

    Advisor to governments and businesses globally, Dr. Boskin also serves on several corporate and philanthropic boards of directors. He is frequently sought as a public speaker on the economic outlook and evolving trends significant to business, national and international economic policy and the intersection of economics and geopolitics.

    Dr. Boskin received his B.A. with highest honors and the Chancellor’s Award as outstanding undergraduate in 1967 from the University of California at Berkeley, where he also received his M.A. in 1968 and his Ph.D. in 1971, all in economics. In addition to Stanford and the University of California, he has taught at Harvard and Yale. He is the author of more than one hundred books and articles. He is internationally recognized for his research on world economic growth, tax and budget theory and policy, Social Security, U.S. saving and consumption patterns, and the implications of changing technology and demography on capital, labor, and product markets.

    Dr. Boskin has received numerous professional awards and citations, including Stanford’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 1988, the National Association of Business Economists’ Abramson Award for outstanding research and their Distinguished Fellow Award, the Medal of the President of the Italian Republic in 1991 for his contributions to global economic understanding, and the 1998 Adam Smith Prize for outstanding contributions to economics.

  • Bruce Cain

    Bruce Cain

    Charles Louis Ducommun Professor in the School of Humanities & Sciences, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research & Professor at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability

    BioBruce E. Cain is a Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and Director of the Bill Lane Center for the American West. He received a BA from Bowdoin College (1970), a B Phil. from Oxford University (1972) as a Rhodes Scholar, and a Ph D from Harvard University (1976). He taught at Caltech (1976-89) and UC Berkeley (1989-2012) before coming to Stanford. Professor Cain was Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley from 1990-2007 and Executive Director of the UC Washington Center from 2005-2012. He was elected the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2000 and has won awards for his research (Richard F. Fenno Prize, 1988), teaching (Caltech 1988 and UC Berkeley 2003) and public service (Zale Award for Outstanding Achievement in Policy Research and Public Service, 2000). His areas of expertise include political regulation, applied democratic theory, representation and state politics. Some of Professor Cain’s most recent publications include “Malleable Constitutions: Reflections on State Constitutional Design,” coauthored with Roger Noll in University of Texas Law Review, volume 2, 2009; “More or Less: Searching for Regulatory Balance,” in Race, Reform and the Political Process, edited by Heather Gerken, Guy Charles and Michael Kang, CUP, 2011; “Redistricting Commissions: A Better Political Buffer?” in The Yale Law Journal, volume 121, 2012; and Democracy More or Less (CUP, 2015). He is currently working on problems of environmental governance.

  • Martin Carnoy

    Martin Carnoy

    Lemann Foundation Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearching econometric models of quality of education in Latin America and Southern Africa. Studying changes in university financing and the quality of engineering and science tertiary education in China, India, and Russia.

  • Christine Pal Chee

    Christine Pal Chee

    Deputy Director

    BioChristine Pal Chee is the Deputy Director of the Public Policy program at Stanford University. She also directs the undergraduate capstone and graduate practicum programs in Public Policy and teaches courses in empirical methods and honors research. Her research interests include the design and effects of health, labor, and social policies.

    Prior to teaching at Stanford, Christine served as a health economist and the Associate Director of the Health Economics Resource Center at the Department of Veterans Affairs. She received her BA in economics from Stanford University and her PhD in economics from Columbia University.

  • Lanhee Chen

    Lanhee Chen

    David and Diane Steffy Fellow in American Public Policy Studies, Hoover Inst.

    BioLanhee J. Chen, Ph.D. is the David and Diane Steffy Fellow in American Public Policy Studies at the Hoover Institution, Director of Domestic Policy Studies in the Public Policy Program, and an Affiliate of the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. He is also a presidentially-appointed and Senate-confirmed member of the independent and bipartisan Social Security Advisory Board.

    Chen is a veteran of several high-profile U.S. political campaigns and served as policy director for Governor Mitt Romney’s 2012 bid for the presidency. In that role, he was Romney’s chief policy adviser; a senior strategist on the campaign; and the person responsible for developing the campaign’s domestic and foreign policy. Previously, Chen served as a senior appointee at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services during the George W. Bush Administration, in private law practice at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, and has advised numerous other presidential, gubernatorial, and congressional campaigns.

    Chen earned his Ph.D. and A.M. in political science from Harvard University, his J.D. cum laude from Harvard Law School, and his A.B. magna cum laude in government from Harvard College.

  • Thomas Dee

    Thomas Dee

    Barnett Family Professor, Professor of Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    BioThomas S. Dee, Ph.D., is the Barnett Family Professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education (GSE), a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and the Faculty Director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities. His research focuses largely on the use of quantitative methods to inform contemporary issues of public policy and practice. The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) awarded his collaborative research the Raymond Vernon Memorial Award in 2015 and again in 2019. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Educational Research Journal, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Education Finance and Policy.

  • Larry Diamond

    Larry Diamond

    Mosbacher Senior Fellow of Global Democracy at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsdemocratic development and regime change; U.S. foreign policy affecting democracy abroad; comparative trends in the quality and stability of democracy in developing countries and postcommunist states; and public opinion in new democracies, especially in East Asia

  • Mark Duggan

    Mark Duggan

    Trione Director of SIEPR, Wayne and Jodi Cooperman Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioMark Duggan is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering at M.I.T. in 1992 and 1994, respectively, and his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1999. He currently is a Co-Editor at the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy and was previously a Co-Editor at the Journal of Public Economics. Before arriving to Stanford in the summer of 2014, Duggan served on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School (2011-14), the University of Maryland's Economics Department (2003-11), and the University of Chicago's Economics Department (1999-2003).

    Professor Duggan's research focuses primarily on the effect of government expenditure programs such as Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid on the behavior of individuals and firms. Some of his more recent research is exploring the effect of federal disability programs on the labor market and of changes to the Medicare and Medicaid programs on the cost and quality of health care. He is also estimating the effect of patent reforms in India on the price and utilization of pharmaceutical treatments. His research has been published in leading academic journals including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics and has been featured in outlets such as The Economist, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal.

    Professor Duggan was the 2010 recipient of the ASHEcon Medal, which is awarded every two years by the American Society of Health Economists to the economist aged 40 and under in the U.S. who has made the most significant contributions to the field of health economics. Along with his co-author Fiona Scott Morton, he received the National Institute for Health Care Management's 2011 Health Care Research Award for their work on Medicare Part D. He was a Fellow of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 2004 to 2006 and a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution from 2006 to 2007. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Social Security Administration, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Duggan served from 2009 to 2010 as the Senior Economist for Health Care Policy at the White House Council of Economic Advisers and has also been an Expert Witness for the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • Karen Eggleston

    Karen Eggleston

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth reform in China; comparative healthcare systems in Asia; government and market roles in the health sector; payment incentives; healthcare productivity; and economic implications of demographic change.

  • Francis Fukuyama

    Francis Fukuyama

    Olivier & Nomellini Senior Fellow in International Studies at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDeveloping nations; governance; international political economy; nation-building and democratization; strategic and security issues

  • Judith L. Goldstein

    Judith L. Goldstein

    Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication, Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioJudith L. Goldstein is the Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication and the Kaye University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Her research focuses on international political economy, with a focus on trade politics. She has written and/or edited six book including Ideas, Interests and American Trade Policy and more recently The Evolution of the Trade Regime: Politics, Law and Economics of the GATT and the WTO. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals.

    Her current research focuses on the political requisites for trade liberalization focusing both on tariff bargaining and public preferences. As well, she is engaged in the analysis of a large survey panel, which focuses on how economic hard times influences public opinion.

    Goldstein has a BA from the University of California Berkeley, a Masters degree from Columbia University and a Ph.D. from UCLA.

  • Mark Granovetter

    Mark Granovetter

    Joan B. Ford Professor

    BioMark Granovetter's main interest is in the way people, social networks and social institutions interact and shape one another. He has written extensively on this subject, including his two most widely cited articles "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973) and "Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness" (1985). In recent years, his focus has been on the social foundations of the economy, and he is working on a book entitled Society and Economy, to be published by Harvard University Press in two volumes. The first volume, Society and Economy: Framework and Principles,appeared in 2017. It is broadly theoretical, treating the role in the economy of social networks, norms, culture, trust, power, and social institutions. The second volume will use this framework to illuminate the study of such important topics as corruption, corporate governance, organizational form and the emergence of new industries such as the American electricity industry and the high-tech industry of Silicon Valley.

  • Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSince 1992 my work has concentrated on ethical, legal, and social issues in the biosciences. I am particularly active on issues arising from neuroscience, human genetics, and stem cell research, with cross-cutting interests in human research protections, human biological enhancement, and the future of human reproduction.

  • David Grusky

    David Grusky

    Edward Ames Edmonds Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioDavid B. Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S. and other high-inequality countries (with a particular focus on the “Great Gatsby” hypothesis that opportunities for social mobility are declining), (c) the role of essentialism in explaining the persistence of extreme gender inequality, (d) the forces behind recent changes in the amount of face-to-face and online cross-class contact, and (e) the putative decline of big social classes. He is also involved in projects to improve the country’s infrastructure for monitoring poverty, inequality, and mobility by exploiting administrative and other forms of “big data” more aggressively. His recent books include Social Stratification (2014), Occupy the Future (2013), The New Gilded Age (2012), The Great Recession (2011), The Inequality Reader (2011), and The Inequality Puzzle (2010).

  • Stephen Haber

    Stephen Haber

    A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioStephen Haber is the A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. In addition, he is a professor of political science, professor of history, and professor of economics (by courtesy).

    Haber has spent his career investigating why the world distribution of income so uneven. His papers have been published in economics, history, political science, and law journals.
    He is the author of five books and the editor of six more. Haber’s most recent books include Fragile by Design with Charles Calomiris (Princeton University Press), which examines how governments and industry incumbents often craft banking regulatory policies in ways that stifle competition and increase systemic risk. The Battle Over Patents (Oxford University Press), a volume edited with Naomi Lamoreaux, documents the development of US-style patent systems and the political fights that have shaped them.

    His latest project focuses on a long-standing puzzle in the social sciences: why are prosperous democracies not randomly distributed across the planet, but rather, are geographically clustered? Haber and his coauthors answer this question by using geospatial tools to simulate the ecological conditions that shaped pre-industrial food production and trade. They then employ machine learning methods to elucidate the relationship between ecological conditions and the levels of economic development that emerged across the globe over the past three centuries.

    Haber holds a Ph.D. in history from UCLA and has been on the Stanford faculty since 1987.
    From 1995 to 1998, he served as associate dean for the social sciences and director of Graduate Studies of Stanford’s School of Humanities and Sciences. He is among Stanford’s most distinguished teachers, having been awarded every teaching prize Stanford has to offer.

  • Eric Hanushek

    Eric Hanushek

    Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioEric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He is internationally recognized for his economic analysis of educational issues, and his research has broadly influenced education policy in both developed and developing countries. In recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field, he was awarded the prestigious Yidan Prize for Education Research in 2021. His extensive and well-cited body of work encompasses many pivotal topics within education, including class size reduction, school accountability, and teacher effectiveness. His pioneering exploration into teacher effectiveness, quantified through students' learning gains, laid the foundation for the widespread adoption of value-added measures in evaluating educators and institutions. His seminal book, The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth, establishes the close relationship between a nation's long-term economic growth and the skill levels of its populace. His scholarly contributions include twenty-six books and over 300 articles contributing to knowledge within the field. He is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and completed his Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (https://hanushek.stanford.edu/)

  • Pamela Hinds

    Pamela Hinds

    Rodney H. Adams Professor in the School of Engineering, Fortinet Founders Chair of the Department of Management Science and Engineering and Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioPamela J. Hinds is Fortinet Founders Chair and Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Co-Director of the Center on Work, Technology, and Organization and on the Director's Council for the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design. She studies the effect of technology on teams, collaboration, and innovation. Pamela has conducted extensive research on the dynamics of cross-boundary work teams, particularly those spanning national borders. She explores issues of culture, language, identity, conflict, and the role of site visits in promoting knowledge sharing and collaboration. She has published extensively on the relationship between national culture and work practices, particularly exploring how work practices or technologies created in one location are understood and employed at distant sites. Pamela also has a body of research on human-robot interaction in the work environment and the dynamics of human-robot teams. Most recently, Pamela has been looking at the changing nature of work in the face of emerging technologies, including the nature of coordination in open innovation, changes in work and organizing resulting from 3D-printing, and the work of data analysts. Her research has appeared in journals such as Organization Science, Research in Organizational Behavior, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Annals, Academy of Management Discoveries, Human-Computer Interaction, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. Pamela is a Senior Editor of Organization Science. She is also co-editor with Sara Kiesler of the book Distributed Work (MIT Press). Pamela holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Science and Management from Carnegie Mellon University.

  • Daniel Ho

    Daniel Ho

    William Benjamin Scott & Luna M. Scott Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, at the Stanford Institute for HAI and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioDaniel E. Ho is the William Benjamin Scott and Luna M. Scott Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science, Professor of Computer Science (by courtesy), Senior Fellow at Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research at Stanford University. He is a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and is Director of the Regulation, Evaluation, and Governance Lab (RegLab). Ho serves on the National Artificial Intelligence Advisory Commission (NAIAC), advising the White House on artificial intelligence, as Senior Advisor on Responsible AI at the U.S. Department of Labor, and as a Public Member of the Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS). He received his J.D. from Yale Law School and Ph.D. from Harvard University and clerked for Judge Stephen F. Williams on the U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit.

  • Hakeem Jefferson

    Hakeem Jefferson

    Assistant Professor of Political Science

    BioI am an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University where I am also a faculty affiliate with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Stanford Center for American Democracy. I received my PhD in political science from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and African American Studies from the University of South Carolina.

    My research focuses primarily on the role identity plays in structuring political attitudes and behaviors in the U.S. I am especially interested in understanding how stigma shapes the politics of Black Americans, particularly as it relates to group members’ support for racialized punitive social policies. In other research projects, I examine the psychological and social roots of the racial divide in Americans’ reactions to officer-involved shootings and work to evaluate the meaningfulness of key political concepts, like ideological identification, among Black Americans.

    My dissertation, "Policing Norms: Punishment and the Politics of Respectability Among Black Americans," was a co-winner of the 2020 Best Dissertation Award from the Political Psychology Section of the American Political Science Association.

  • William Koski

    William Koski

    The Eric and Nancy Wright Professor of Clinical Education and Professor (Teaching), by courtesy, of Education
    On Leave from 09/01/2023 To 08/31/2024

    BioAn accomplished clinical teacher and litigator, William Koski (PhD ’03) is the founder and director of the law school’s Youth and Education Law Project (YELP). He has also taught multidisciplinary graduate seminars and courses in educational law and policy.

    Professor Koski and YELP have represented hundreds of children, youth, and families in special education, student discipline, and other educational rights matters. Professor Koski has also served as lead counsel or co-counsel in several path-breaking complex school reform litigations including Robles-Wong v. California, that sought to reform the public school finance system in the state; Emma C. v. Eastin, that has restructured the special education service delivery system in a Bay Area school district and aims to reform the California Department of Education’s special education monitoring system; Smith v. Berkeley Unified School District, that successfully reformed the school discipline policies in Berkeley, CA; and Stephen C. v. Bureau of Indian Education, that seeks to hold the federal Bureau of Indian Education accountable for their failure to provide children in the Havasupai Native American tribe in Arizona with an adequate and equitable education.

    Reflecting his multidisciplinary background as a lawyer and social scientist, Professor Koski’s scholarly work focuses on the related issues of educational accountability, equity and adequacy; the politics of educational policy reform; teacher employment policies; and judicial decision-making in educational policy reform litigation.

    Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 2001, Professor Koski was a lecturer in law at Stanford and a supervising attorney at the law school’s East Palo Alto Community Law Project. He was also an associate at Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe and then Alden, Aronovsky & Sax.

    Professor Koski has an appointment (by courtesy) with the Stanford School of Education.

  • Mark Lemley

    Mark Lemley

    William Neukom Professor of Law and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsintellectual property, Internet, and antitrust law; law and AI/robotics

  • Jonathan Levin

    Jonathan Levin

    Philip H. Knight Professor for the Dean at the Graduate School of Business, Holbrook Working Professor of Price Theory at the School of Humanities and Sciences, and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioJonathan Levin, a distinguished economist and academic leader, is the Philip H. Knight Professor and Dean of the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. During his tenure as dean, the GSB’s faculty and educational programs have prospered, and the school has expanded its efforts in key areas including technology and sustainability. Levin is widely recognized for his scholarship in microeconomics and industrial organization. He received the John Bates Clark Medal as the outstanding American economist under the age of 40. He currently serves as a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.

  • Thomas MaCurdy

    Thomas MaCurdy

    Professor of Economics, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioThomas MaCurdy is a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute of Economic Policy Research, and he further holds appointments as a Professor of Economics and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. MaCurdy has published numerous articles and reports in professional journals and general-interest public policy venues, and he has served in an editorial capacity for several journals. He is a widely-recognized economist and expert in applied econometrics, who has developed and implemented a wide range of empirical approaches analyzing the impacts of policy in the areas of healthcare and social service programs. MaCurdy directs numerous projects supporting the activities and operations of the Center of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Congressional Budget Office (CBO), General Accounting Office (GAO), and Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), and Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC), and he has served as a member of several standing technical review committees for many federal and state government agencies (e.g., CBO, Census, BLS, California Health Benefits Review Program). MaCurdy currently supervises several empirical projects that support CMS regulatory policy responsible for the establishment of Healthcare Exchanges under the Affordable Care Act.

  • Thomas Mullaney

    Thomas Mullaney

    Professor of History and, by courtesy, of East Asian Languages and Cultures

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThomas S. Mullaney is Professor of History and Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures, by courtesy. He is also the Kluge Chair in Technology and Society at the Library of Congress, and a Guggenheim Fellow.

    He is the author or lead editor of 7 books, including The Chinese Typewriter (winner of the Fairbank prize), Your Computer is on Fire, Coming to Terms with the Nation: Ethnic Classification in Modern China, and the forthcoming The Chinese Computer—the first comprehensive history of Chinese-language computing.

    His writings have appeared in the Journal of Asian Studies, Technology & Culture, Aeon, Foreign Affairs, and Foreign Policy, and his work has been featured in the LA Times, The Atlantic, the BBC, and in invited lectures at Google, Microsoft, Adobe, and more. He holds a PhD from Columbia University.

  • Joe Nation

    Joe Nation

    Professor of the Practice of Public Policy

    BioJoe Nation is a Professor of the Practice of Public Policy at Stanford University, where he co-directs the graduate student Practicum in public policy and teaches policy courses on climate change, health care, and California state issues. He also serves as a Grossman-Kennedy Fellow in Human Biology, teaching environmental and health policy. He received the Phi Beta Kappa Undergraduate Teaching Award in 2023.

    His current research is focused on climate change and improving data-driven decisions by state governments. Nation sits on the board of Advisors for Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service and is a Faculty Affiliate at Stanford’s Center on Longevity. He has consulted for RAND for more than 30 years since his graduation from the Pardee RAND Graduate School (PRGS) in 1989.

    From 1992-2000, he served on the Marin Water Board, including two terms as President. From 2000-2006, he represented Marin and Southern Sonoma Counties in the California State Assembly. He was the principal co-author of AB 32, California’s Global Warmings Solutions Act and was selected as Legislator of the Year by a number of organizations.

  • Roger Noll

    Roger Noll

    Professor of Economics, Emeritus

    BioRoger G. Noll is professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University. Noll also is a Senior Fellow and member of the Advisory Board at the American Antitrust Institute. Noll received a B.S. with honors in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph. D. in economics from Harvard University. Prior to joining Stanford, Noll was a Senior Economist at the President's Council of Economic Advisers, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Institute Professor of Social Science and Chair of the Division of Humanities and Social Sciences at the California Institute of Technology. At Stanford, Noll served as Associate Dean for Social Sciences in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Public Policy Program, and Senior Fellow in the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research where he also was Director of the Program in Regulatory Policy and Director of the Stanford Center for International Development.

    Noll is the author or co-author of seventeen books and over three hundred articles and reviews. His primary research interests include technology policy; antitrust, regulation and privatization policies in both advanced and developing economies; economic aspects of public law (administrative law, judicial processes, and statutory interpretation); and the economics of sports and entertainment. Among Noll’s published books are Economic Aspects of Television Regulation (1973), Government and the Sports Business (1974), The Technology Pork Barrel (1991), Constitutional Reform in California (1995), Sports, Jobs and Taxes (1997), Challenges to Research Universities (1998), and Economic Reform in India (2013).

    Noll has been a member of the advisory boards of the U.S. Department of Energy, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and National Science Foundation. He also has been a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy of the National Research Council, and of the California Council on Science and Technology.

    Noll has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, the annual book award of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters, the Rhodes Prize for undergraduate education at Stanford, the Distinguished Service Award of the Public Utilities Research Center, the Alfred E. Kahn Distinguished Career Award from the American Antitrust Institute, the Distinguished Member Award from the Transportation and Public Utilities Group of the American Economic Association, Economist of the Year from Global Competition Review, and the American Antitrust Institute award for Distinguished Achievement by an Economist in Antitrust Litigation.

  • Bruce Owen

    Bruce Owen

    Morris M. Doyle Centennial Professor in Public Policy, Emeritus

    BioBruce M. Owen is the Morris M. Doyle Professor in Public Policy, Emeritus, in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, and the Gordon Cain Senior Fellow, Emeritus, in Stanford's Institute for Economic Policy Research. For a decade ending in 2015 he was Director of the Stanford Public Policy Program. Professor Owen in 2007 led a successful effort to institute a new masters’ degree program in public policy (MPP) at Stanford. He earlier established an international reputation as an expert on antitrust economics, and was the leading academic student of the economics of mass media markets. He is regarded as a principal architect of the 1974 U.S. Department of Justice antitrust lawsuit that led to the eventual dissolution of the old Bell System, and he testified at the trial of the case in 1981. At Stanford, he has taught courses in economic analysis of law, telecommunications law and policy, and political corruption.
    Until 2003, Owen was CEO of Economists Incorporated, a Washington DC consulting firm specializing in antitrust and regulatory policy analysis. Before co-founding Economists Incorporated in 1981, he was the Chief Economist of the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and, earlier, of the White House Office of Telecommunications Policy. He was also a faculty member in the Schools of Business and Law at Duke University and the department of economics at Stanford University. Owen was graduated from Williams College in 1965 with a B.A. in economics and from Stanford in 1970 with a Ph.D., also in economics. He was a Woodrow Wilson Fel-low.
    Professor Owen was the author or co-author of numerous articles and eight books, including Television Economics (1974), Economics and Freedom of Expression (1975), The Regulation Game (1978), The Political Economy of Deregulation (1983), Video Economics (1992) and Electric Utility Mergers: Principles of Antitrust Analysis (1994). He was an expert witness in several antitrust and regulatory proceedings. In addition to United States v. AT&T, these included United States Football League v. National Football League, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission review of Southern California Edison’s proposed acquisition of San Diego Gas and Electric Co.
    In 1992 Owen headed a World Bank task force that advised Argentina's government in drafting a new antitrust law. He also advised government agencies in Mexico and the U.S. on telecommunications policy and in Peru on antitrust policy. He was a consultant to the World Bank concerning the economic evaluation of legal and judicial reform projects. His most recent book, The Internet Challenge to Television, was published by Harvard University Press in 1999.
    In recent years, Professor Owen has turned to the economic analysis of Madisonian remedies for the adverse effects of lawful political corruption in the U.S. He published “’To Promote the General Welfare' - Addressing Political Corruption in America,” British Journal of Ameri-can Legal Studies, in 2016. He is now working on a book with the working title “Madison’s Missing Branch,” a draft is available at SSRN.

  • Stephen Palumbi

    Stephen Palumbi

    Jane and Marshall Steel Jr. Professor of Marine Sciences, Professor of Oceans and of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe're interested in ecological, evolutionary, and conservation questions related to marine (and sometimes terrestrial) organisms and ecosystems. We use evolutionary genetics and molecular ecology techniques, and our fieldwork takes us all around the world. Currently, we're studying coral diversity, the adaptive potential of corals in response to climate change, the movement of organisms between marine reserves, genetic changes in abalone in response to environmental.

  • Walter W. Powell

    Walter W. Powell

    Jacks Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Communication, of Sociology and of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlease go to my webpage for more info on research:
    https://woodypowell.com

  • sean reardon

    sean reardon

    Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology
    On Leave from 01/01/2024 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe causes and patterns of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic achievement disparities;

    The effects of school integration policies on segregation patterns and educational outcomes;

    Income inequality and its educational and social consequences.

    http://cepa.stanford.edu/sean-reardon

  • Rob Reich

    Rob Reich

    McGregor-Girand Professor of Social Ethics of Science and Technology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI, Professor, by courtesy, of Education, of Philosophy and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at FSI

    BioRob Reich is professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy and at the Graduate School of Education. He is a co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (publisher of the Stanford Social Innovation Review), and associate director of the Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. He was faculty director at the Center for Ethics in Society for eight years, and he continues to lead its ethics and technology initiatives.

    His scholarship in political theory engages with the work of social scientists and engineers. His newest work is on ethics and AI. His most recent books are System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot (with Mehran Sahami and Jeremy M. Weinstein, HarperCollins 2021) and Digital Technology and Democratic Theory (edited with Lucy Bernholz and Hélène Landemore, University of Chicago Press 2021). He has also written widely about philanthropy, including Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better (Princeton University Press, 2018) and Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values (edited with Chiara Cordelli and Lucy Bernholz, University of Chicago Press, 2016). His early work is focused on democracy and education, including Bridging Liberalism and Multiculturalism in American Education (University of Chicago Press, 2002) and Education, Justice, and Democracy (edited with Danielle Allen, University of Chicago Press, 2013). He has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, Wired, The Guardian, and the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

    Rob is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores award, Stanford’s highest honor for teaching. He was a sixth grade teacher at Rusk Elementary School in Houston, Texas before attending graduate school. He is a board member of the magazine Boston Review, of Giving Tuesday, and at the Spencer Foundation.

  • Gregory Rosston

    Gregory Rosston

    Gordon Cain Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioGreg Rosston is Director of the Public Policy program at Stanford University, the Gordon Cain Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and Professor of Economics (by courtesy). He teaches Economics and Public Policy courses on competition policy and strategy, economic policy analysis, and writing and rhetoric.

    Dr. Rosston served as Deputy Chief Economist at the Federal Communications Commission working on the implementation of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and the design and implementation of the first ever spectrum auctions in the United States. In 2011, he was Senior Economist for Transactions for the Federal Communications Commission for the proposed AT&T – T-Mobile transaction. He served as a member and co-chair of the Department of Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory Committee.

    Dr. Rosston received his Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University and his A.B. with Honors from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Rosston has written extensively on the application of economics to telecommunications and competition issues. He has advised companies and governments regarding auctions and served as a consultant to various organizations including the World Bank and the Federal Communications Commission, and as a board member and advisor to high technology, financial, and startup companies. He serves as Vice Chair of the Board of the Stanford Federal Credit Union, as a Board member of the Nepal Youth Foundation and as an Advisory Board member of Sustainable Conservation and the Technology Policy Institute.

  • Kenneth Schultz

    Kenneth Schultz

    William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science

    BioKenneth A. Schultz is William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. His research examines international conflict and conflict resolution. He is the author of Democracy and Coercive Diplomacy and World Politics: Interests, Interactions, and Institutions (with David Lake and Jeffry Frieden), as well as numerous articles in peer-reviewed scholarly journals. He was the recipient the 2003 Karl Deutsch Award, given by the International Studies Association, and a 2011 Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching, awarded by Stanford’s School of Humanities and Sciences. He received his PhD in political science from Stanford University.