School of Medicine


Showing 101-200 of 229 Results

  • William Rhine

    William Rhine

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity and brain injury, non-invasive biotechnologies to study cellular and organ metabolism.

  • Fauzia Riaz, M.D., M.H.S.

    Fauzia Riaz, M.D., M.H.S.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Riaz is a medical oncologist specializing in breast cancer whose research focuses on novel therapeutics and approaches cancer care delivery for patients with breast cancer. She is currently a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Riaz completed formal research training during her fellowship, through Yale University’s Advanced Health Sciences Research program. This included training in biostatistics, research methodology, and health policy, ultimately culminating in the completion of a Master of Health Sciences. As faculty, she is an active member of the Stanford Breast Oncology Clinical Research Group, and currently serves as the Stanford site principal investigator and sub-investigator for several ongoing breast cancer clinical trials.

  • Anthony J. Ricci, PhD

    Anthony J. Ricci, PhD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe auditory sensory cell, the hair cell, detects mechanical stimulation at the atomic level and conveys information regarding frequency and intensity to the brain with high fidelity. Our interests are in identifying specializations associated with mechanotransduction and synaptic transmission leading to the amazing sensitivities of the auditory system. We are also interested in the developmental process, particularly in how development gives insight into repair and regenerative mechanisms.

  • Brian Travis Rice

    Brian Travis Rice

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDeveloping data-driven approaches to defining and comparing chief complaints fro emergency and unscheduled acute care in low- and middle-income countries

  • Joshua Richards

    Joshua Richards

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Richards is board certified in Orthopedic Surgery and has a Certified Additional Qualification for Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery. For over 15 years he has specialized in the treatment of ligamentous, joint, tendon, nerve and bone injuries of the Hand, Elbow, Wrist and Shoulder.

    He has served the Bay Area community as a UCSF Assistant Professor as a volunteer educator at San Francisco General Hospital, by teaching and treating complex trauma at the Alameda County Level One Trauma Center-Highland Hospital, and through various volunteer roles on athletic fields around the Bay.

    Dr. Richards obtained his Bachelors Degree in Neurobiology at Cornell University, his Masters of Public Health at the Columbia University, and his Medical Degree at New York Medical College.

    He completed his residency in orthopedic surgery at the San Francisco Orthopedic Residency Program. He then returned to Cornell University’s Hospital for Special Surgery to complete his fellowship training in hand, upper extremity, and microvascular surgery.

    Until joining Stanford in 2023, he had been in private practice in the East Bay since 2006. He has volunteered locally in a variety of organizations and internationally on several continents.

  • Jenae Aesha Richardson

    Jenae Aesha Richardson

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Jenae Richardson is a Clinical Assistant Professor and a CA Licensed Clinical Psychologist in the INSPIRE Clinic in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She also works in the acute psychiatric inpatient units at Stanford Hospital. She specializes in utilizing evidence-based treatments (EBTs) to treat individuals with psychosis and has worked with this population across inpatient and outpatient settings. She is passionate about improving the dissemination and implementation of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for psychosis (CBTp), and at the INSPIRE Clinic, she leads CBTp trainings for mental health professionals and provides CBTp to individuals with psychosis. Dr. Richardson completed her pre-doctoral internship at the University of Arizona’s Early Psychosis Intervention Center and her postdoctoral fellowship at Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. She obtained her doctorate in clinical psychology from Long Island University Post and conducted research exploring barriers to implementing CBTp in the United States.

  • Stephen Richmond

    Stephen Richmond

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Stephen Richmond (he/him/his) is a family physician, educator, and health justice advocate with specific interest in racial equity in medicine. He currently serves as a clinical assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Primary Care & Population Health (PCPH) in the Stanford Department of Medicine. He completed his A.S. at Solano Community College, B.A. in Molecular & Cell Biology at UC Berkeley, M.P.H. at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and his M.D. at David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA. He is a graduate of the UCSF-San Francisco General Hospital Family & Community Medicine Residency Program.

    As a clinician, Dr. Richmond cares for individuals of all ages with a wide range of acute and chronic illnesses. He is especially passionate about providing high quality, evidenced-based care to underserved communities of color. As a researcher and educator, his interests broadly involve the intersection of race, racism, and medicine, with current projects focused on applications of Critical Race Theory to medical education and clinical care. He currently serves as the faculty director for the REACH Health Equity Scholarly Concentration within the school of Medicine and the Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Curriculum Lead within the PCPH Division.

    Beyond Stanford, Dr. Richmond is involved in many ongoing advocacy efforts aimed at achieving health equity through individual and structural-level change. Dr. Richmond has received multiple teaching awards for his work in the space of equity, inclusion & anti-oppression in medicine, and is a routine presenter and consultant in these areas.

  • Ashley Christine Rider

    Ashley Christine Rider

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioAshley C. Rider is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University. After completing her training in emergency medicine at Highland Hospital in Oakland, CA, she pursued a fellowship at Stanford in Simulation Education while simultaneously working on a Master of Education in the Health Professions (MEHP) at Johns Hopkins School of Education. After fellowship, she has stayed on at Stanford to continue her work as simulation faculty as well as serve as an Assistant Program Director for the Emergency Medicine Residency Program. Her academic interests include simulation-based education at the UME/GME levels, interprofessional education, operations data as it relates to learner development, quality improvement, resuscitation team dynamics, and social emergency medicine.

  • Eric Rider, MD

    Eric Rider, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Rider is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neuromuscular neurologist with the Neuromuscular Program at the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center. He is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Rider specializes in treating neuromuscular disease, including motor neuron disease, disorders of the neuromuscular junction, peripheral and focal neuropathies, as well as other acquired or genetic conditions that cause muscular deterioration, muscle weakness, and nerve damage. He practices both Comprehensive Neurology and Neuromuscular Medicine in Palo Alto and Emeryville.

    Dr. Rider earned his medical degree at the University of California, San Francisco and completed residency at Stanford. He also completed fellowship training in Neuromuscular Medicine at UCSF. He has a passion for teaching neurology to students and patients. He was awarded the Fishers and Dunn teaching award for medical student teaching as a resident.
    Dr. Rider is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

  • Kerri E. Rieger, MD, PhD

    Kerri E. Rieger, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Pathology
    Clinical Professor, Dermatology

    BioDr. Rieger is a Clinical Professor of Pathology and Dermatology at Stanford University. She received her M.D., Ph.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine and completed her Dermatology Residency and Dermatopathology Fellowship at Stanford University. She is board certified in Dermatology and Dermatopathology. She evaluates skin specimens in the Pathology department, where her interests include histopathologic findings in cutaneous lymphoma, hospitalized patients, and patients with autoimmune disease. She also sees patients in the Stanford dermatology clinic in Portola Valley, where her clinical interest is adult general dermatology.

  • Fran Riley

    Fran Riley

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioDr. Fran Riley is a physician engineer and Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University. She obtained an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering and robotics, she obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of Waterloo where she focused on robotics. Driven by her passion for merging medicine and technology, she pursued a Master's degree in Computer Science at The Johns Hopkins University, where she developed a motor controller for an early prototypes of the Da Vinci robot for ENT surgical applications. Dr. Riley's research also focused on utilizing real-time monitoring data to enhance the treatment of traumatic brain injuries in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Following her work in robotics and computer science, Dr. Riley transitioned to the healthcare industry, where she served as a product manager at Microsoft. In this role, she lead multidisciplinary teams to develop multiple features for an electronic medical record dedicated to data analytics. The product was then acquired by GE Healthcare.

    Dr. Riley then pursued a medical degree at the University of Vermont, followed by a residency and chief residency at Maimonides Medical Center. She then completed a fellowship in emergency ultrasound at Columbia University Medical Center.

    At Stanford, Dr. Riley is an integral part of the Stanford Emergency Medicine Partnership Program (STEPP), utilizing her technical expertise to identify industry partners for research collaborations and product development. She also actively contributes to a hospital-wide committee dedicated to evaluating the use of informatics for clinical care, prioritizing patient safety and high-quality care.

    Dr. Riley's clinical research focuses on leveraging artificial intelligence in image recognition for regional wall motion abnormalities, specifically utilizing point-of-care ultrasound to diagnose acute coronary syndrome.

  • Geoffrey Riley

    Geoffrey Riley

    Clinical Professor, Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMSK tumors, sarcomas, bone tumors, soft tissue tumors.

  • Lawrence Rinsky

    Lawrence Rinsky

    Professor (Clinical) of Orthopaedic Surgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe primary subjects of my research interests over the past ten years have been clinical reviews of series of patients with a variety of pediatric orthopaedic treatable conditions. These have included neuromuscular scoliosis, developmental dislocation of the hip, and deformities in cerebral palsy.

  • Joshua Daniel Rittenberg, MD

    Joshua Daniel Rittenberg, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Rittenberg is a board-certified, fellowship-trained physiatrist with more than 20 years of experience specializing in rehabilitative and interventional spine care. He is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

    In his clinical practice, Dr. Rittenberg provides expert care for painful spine disorders. He excels at interventional pain management and has extensive experience in a variety of spinal disorders, including sports-related spine injuries

    Prior to joining Stanford, he was co-chair of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department for Kaiser Northern California. Additionally, he spent 10 years at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, where he served as Medical Director of Musculoskeletal and Spine Procedures at the Spine and Sports Rehabilitation Center. He was a consultant in the Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation Department of Orthopedic Surgery and an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

    Dr. Rittenberg excels at the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the spine. He delivers state-of-the-art treatment for pain, emphasizing non-operative and minimally invasive approaches.

    For each patient, he prepares a personalized plan of care designed to be both comprehensive and compassionate. In every case, his goals are to relieve symptoms and enable the best possible quality of life.

    Dr. Rittenberg lectures nationally and internationally, has chaired numerous continuing education courses for physicians, and has published original research, review articles, and book chapters in the areas of interventional and rehabilitative spine care.

    He has volunteered and held leadership positions in the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, the North American Spine Society, and the International Pain and Spine Intervention Society. He is the current President of the International Pain and Spine Intervention Society(IPSIS).

    Dr. Rittenberg has earned honors and recognition for his achievements. They include being named to the Healthgrades Honor Roll and recognized as a regional top doctor by Castle Connolly, the research and information resource for health care consumers.

  • Juan Rivas-Davila

    Juan Rivas-Davila

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern applications demand power capabilities beyond what is presently achievable. High performance systems need high power density and bandwidth that are difficult to achieve.
    Power density can be improved with better semiconductors and passive componets, and by reducing the energy storage requirements of the system. By dramatically increasing switching frequency it is possible to reduce size of power converters. I'm interested in high performance/frequency circuits switching >10 MHz.

  • Lucia Angelica Rivera Lara, MD, MPH

    Lucia Angelica Rivera Lara, MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Rivera-Lara is a neurocritical care fellowship-trained neurologist and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    As a member of the neurocritical care team, Dr. Rivera-Lara expertise focuses on the prompt, careful assessment and treatment of patients who suffer stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, and seizures.

    In her research, Dr. Rivera-Lara has studied innovations to control blood flow and relieve intracranial pressure in patients with hemorrhage. Her findings have been published in journals including Critical Care Medicine, Neurocritical Care, Stroke, Seizure, the Journal of Neurosurgery and Anesthesiology, JAMA, and presented at the International Stroke Conference, the Critical Care Conference, and at meetings of the American Academy of Neurology and Neurocritical Care Society.

    She has co-authored book chapters on stroke management, neurocritical patient monitoring, antiepileptic drug therapies, brain injury after cardiac arrest, and other topics. In addition, she has served as an editorial reviewer for publications including Neurology, Critical Care Medicine, the Journal of Critical Care, Neurocritical Care and Frontiers of Neurology.

    Dr. Rivera-Lara earned a Clinical Reaserch Fellowship Training award from the American Academy of Neurology and American Brain Foundation. She was nominated for the Best Consulting Physician Award, one of only a few clinical honors bestowed annually on physicians and care teams by Johns Hopkins Medicine.

    She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Society of Critical Care Medicine, and Neurocritical Care Society.

    In conjunction with the Pan-American Health Organization and World Health Organization, Dr. Rivera-Lara has volunteered her time and expertise to help develop neurocritical care recommendations for patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome associated with Zika virus in the Dominican Republic. She also has served as a visiting professor in the Department of Neurology at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City and Ignacio Morones Prieto Hospital in San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

  • Norman Rizk

    Norman Rizk

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the prevention and control of critical care-related illnesses and complications, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, spread of nosocomial infections, and prognosis of multiple organ system failure in intensive care units. Infections and complications of therapy in immunocompromised hosts, including effects of chemotherapy and hematopoetic stem cell transplants is another interest.

  • Gary K. Roberts, D.D.S.

    Gary K. Roberts, D.D.S.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

    BioDr. Roberts has performed hospital dentistry and surgery at Stanford University Medical Center and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital since 1995. He is also on the faculty at University of the Pacific School of Dentistry. He treats a variety of oral and maxillofacial conditions, including dental trauma and infection, dental implant and restorative reconstruction, surgical tooth extraction, bone and tissue grafting, conventional and surgical endodontic procedures, dental oncology care of cancer patients, as well as orofacial pain treatment.

    He has presented CME lectures and Grand Rounds to numerous Departments at Stanford, as well as teaching Residents and Fellows at Stanford Medical School and the Palo Alto VA. He also lectures in the Physician Assistant Program at Stanford.

    During his nearly a quarter of a century of military service, he was one of the leading researchers on combat trauma and the pathophysiology of projectile wounds. He currently serves as a member of the Council on Peer with the California Dental Association and is an Anesthesia Evaluator for the California State Dental Board.  Dr. Roberts is frequently asked to speak on a variety of topics to organizations both in the US and internationally.

  • Laura Roberts, MD, MA

    Laura Roberts, MD, MA

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Roberts has performed numerous empirical studies of contemporary ethics issues in medicine and health policy and has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, the National Alliance of Schizophrenia and Depression, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, and other private and public foundations.

  • Tawna L. Roberts, OD, PhD

    Tawna L. Roberts, OD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology (Pediatric) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research efforts are funded by grants from the National Eye Institute, Department of Defense, and various foundations to study vision development in infants and young children as well as binocular vision disorders in adolescents and adults with concussions. Our focus is to identify underlying mechanisms that will inform clinical treatment approaches and ultimately leading to the prevention of strabismus, amblyopia, and binocular vision disorders.

  • Zachary T. Roberts, MD

    Zachary T. Roberts, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Zach Roberts is a board-certified neurologist and epileptologist with Stanford Health Care’s Comprehensive Neurology Program. He is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences. He completed two years of epilepsy fellowship training at New York University Langone Health where he gained extensive experience using neuromodulatory devices and managing epilepsy that is difficult to treat. Prior to this fellowship, he completed his neurology residency at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Dr. Roberts specializes in caring for patients with epilepsy. He creates personalized, comprehensive care plans tailored to each patient’s unique needs. He is skilled in the use of neuromodulatory devices for treating epilepsy, including vagal nerve stimulation (VNS), responsive neurostimulation (RNS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). His additional clinical interests include the interpretation of electroencephalography (EEG) studies as well as the treatment of sleep disorders.

    Dr. Roberts has had a passion for medical education throughout his training as a doctor. He has taught and created content related to neurology and epilepsy for medical students, residents, fellows, and patients. He has designed a simulation-based learning module for the treatment of prolonged seizures and lectured on neurology for a physician assistant program in Pennsylvania. He is dedicated to advancing the knowledge of both his peers and patients.

    His research interests include quality improvement as well as using technology to aid health care delivery—both in treating epilepsy and in the field of neurology. Dr. Roberts’ work has been featured on posters presented at national and international conferences. He has also published a peer-reviewed journal article on doctors’ experiences with teleneurology in Telemedicine and e-Health.

    Dr. Roberts is an active member of the American Academy of Neurology, the American Medical Association, and the American Epilepsy Society.

  • Terry Robinson

    Terry Robinson

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on detection of early and progressive Cystic fibrosis (CF) structural lung disease by utilizing chest CT imaging and CT post-processing methodology. Current research efforts involve utilization of low dose infant & children CT imaging protocols and quantitative airway and air trapping algorithms to evaluate early and progressive CF disease.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:
    1. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.
    2. To investigate the role of innate immune inflammation in osteoarthritis.
    3. To develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Todsaporn Rodbumrung

    Todsaporn Rodbumrung

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Rodbumrung completed his undergraduate degree at The University of Texas at Austin and MD at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Texas. After completing medical school he went on to train at Stanford University Hospital, completing internship and residency in Anesthesiology where he continues to practice today as faculty. As a clinical educator, Dr. Rodbumrung is deeply committed to teaching and patient care. His clinical areas of focus include the adult Multi-Specialty Division and Head and Neck Anesthesia often caring for patients with complex head and neck pathologies utilizing the latest techniques in airway management. He also serves as the Surgery Anesthesia Rotation Director, working with surgery interns and residents learning anesthesia and airway management during their training.

  • Carolyn Rodriguez

    Carolyn Rodriguez

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioDr. Carolyn Rodriguez is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Stanford University School of Medicine and a Consultation-Liaison Psychiatrist at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs. As the Director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dr. Rodriguez leads studies investigating the brain basis of severe mental disorders. Her landmark clinical trials pioneer rapid-acting treatments for illnesses including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and related disorders. Her NIH-, foundation-, and donor-funded mechanistic and clinical efficacy studies span targeted glutamatergic and opioid pathway pharmacotherapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, psychotherapy and suicide prevention. She is co-author of “Hoarding Disorder: A Comprehensive Clinical Guide,” published August 2022 by APA Publishing.

    Dr. Rodriguez also serves as Deputy Editor of The American Journal of Psychiatry, member of the Research Council of the American Psychiatric Association, member of Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Scientific Council, member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Advisory Group, and Scientific and Clinical Advisory Board member of the International OCD Foundation. She has won several national awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE recognizes investigators who are pursuing bold and innovative projects and is considered one of the highest honors in scientific research. Carolyn presented her research at the World Economic Forum in Davos and Fortune Brainstorm Health 2022 and her work has been highlighted by organizations including NPR, PBS, New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, Newsweek, Fortune, and Time.com. She contributes articles to Harvard Business Review and Huffington Post to share scientific findings with the public.

    Carolyn received her B.S. in Computer Science from Harvard University, followed by an M.D. from Harvard Medical School-M.I.T. and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Genetics from Harvard Medical School. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, she now lives with her husband and three children in Palo Alto.

  • Eunice Rodriguez

    Eunice Rodriguez

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent program of teaching and research integrates: 1) health disparities and social epidemiology, within the broader area of public health, and 2) program evaluation, as a synthesis of theory and methods applied to the evaluation of health and social programs.

  • Fatima Rodriguez

    Fatima Rodriguez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioFatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine and (by courtesy) the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Dr. Rodriguez earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School and her MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. She then completed internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowship in cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University. She currently serves as the Section Chief of Preventive Cardiology. Dr. Rodriguez specializes in cardiovascular disease prevention, inherited lipid disorders, and cardiovascular risk assessment in high-risk populations.

    Dr. Rodriguez’s research includes a range of topics around racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in cardiovascular disease prevention, developing novel interventions to address disparities, and opportunistic screening of coronary artery disease.

  • Samuel Rodriguez, MD

    Samuel Rodriguez, MD

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Sam Rodriguez is a native of New Jersey and practicing Pediatric Anesthesiologist at Stanford Children's Hospital. He is best known for being the husband of the Stanford Cardiologist Dr. Fatima Rodriguez. Sam was a member of the self proclaimed greatest Anesthesia Residency Class in history (MGH 2012). He is a founder and co-director of the Stanford CHARIOT Program which creates and studies innovative approaches to treating pediatric pain and stress through technology. The CHARIOT Program has positively impacted thousands of children around the world and has grown to include emerging technologies like virtual reality, augmented reality, and interactive video games. Dr. Rodriguez is also highly involved in medical humanities education at Stanford Medical School and teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels on how studying art can make better physicians.

  • Patricia Rodriguez Espinosa

    Patricia Rodriguez Espinosa

    Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr. Patricia Rodriguez Espinosa, PhD., MPH, is a native of Habana, Cuba, and clinical psychologist by training. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and also serves as the Associate Director of Research for the Office of Community Engagement at Stanford Medicine. The ultimate goal of her research is to decrease health inequities among racial/ethnic minority populations, particularly Latinxs and immigrant communities, through transdisciplinary and community-engaged scholarship. Her research aims to understand factors that create and maintain health inequities (e.g., racial residential segregation) and use these insights to develop novel multi-level interventions and health promotion programs to address the inequity gap and that include multi-sectoral collaborations. Dr. Rodriguez Espinosa's research has also centered around developing the science of Community-Based Participatory Research, citizen science, and other participatory research approaches.

  • Kacper Rogala

    Kacper Rogala

    Assistant Professor of Structural Biology and of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur team is fascinated by how cells make growth decisions — to grow or not to grow. In order to grow, cells require nutrients, and we are unraveling how cells use specialized protein sensors and transporters to sense and traffic nutrients in between various compartments. We use approaches from structural biology, chemical biology, biophysics, biochemistry, and cell biology — to reveal the mechanisms of basic biological processes, and we develop chemical probes that modulate them.

  • Stephan Rogalla, M.D. PhD

    Stephan Rogalla, M.D. PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research interest of myself and my lab are in the field of early cancer detection using targeted molecular spies to highlight (pre)cancerous lesions. We as well aim to improve precision medicine in autoimmune disorders like inflammatory bowel disease and oncology.

  • Albert "A.J." Rogers, MD, MBA

    Albert "A.J." Rogers, MD, MBA

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Rogers is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiologist with the Cardiac Arrhythmia Service at Stanford Health Care. He is also an instructor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    As a clinical cardiac electrophysiologist, Dr. Rogers’ training includes evaluating issues involving electrical activity in the heart and how these can lead to an abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia). His expertise includes mapping regions in the heart associated with arrhythmias and then applying a minimally invasive therapy (ablation) that targets the responsible areas causing the problem. He also performs procedures to implant cardiac devices, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, designed to synchronize heart contractions and reset irregular heartbeats.

    Dr. Rogers specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, and other arrhythmias. In collaboration with Stanford Medicine cardiovascular surgeons, he performs hybrid surgical-catheter ablation procedures as a more permanent treatment for persistent forms of atrial fibrillation and for inappropriate sinus tachycardia. During this procedure, ablation therapy is applied to areas both inside and outside of the heart responsible for the arrhythmia.

    As a physician-researcher, Dr. Rogers’ translational research applies biomedical engineering and machine learning approaches to explore the mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmia. These efforts include research funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association to investigate novel methods for diagnosing and treating heart rhythm disorders. Dr. Rogers has over 10 years of experience with medical technology innovation and development.

    Dr. Rogers serves as associate editor of the Journal of Invasive Cardiovascular Electrophysiology. He is also a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including Heart Rhythm, The Lancet: Digital Health, the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Clinical Electrophysiology, and Frontiers in Physiology. He has been an invited guest speaker at national and international meetings, including those for the American Heart Association and the European Cardiac Arrythmia Society.

  • Angela Rogers

    Angela Rogers

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetics and genomics methodologies to identify novel ARDS pathobiology; we hope that this will enable identification of novel biomarkers, phenotypes, and treatments for the disease. We are building a plasma biobank of critically ill patients at Stanford, with a particular focus on metabolic changes in critical illness.

  • Lisa Rogo-Gupta

    Lisa Rogo-Gupta

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Urology

    BioDr. Rogo-Gupta is a urogynecologist and Associate Division Director of Gynecology and Gynecologic Specialties, Clinic Chief of the Ambulatory Gynecology Service Line, and Well-Being Director for the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. In her current roles, Dr. Rogo-Gupta seeks to incorporate physician well-being into strategic decisions impacting all parts of the academic mission—clinical care, education, and research. She is particularly proud of operational changes to increase efficiency and improve both patient and physician experience. Under her leadership gynecology was recognized as one of the TOP 10 patient experience drivers across the enterprise. Dr. Rogo-Gupta is passionate about teaching and mentoring and has received numerous awards throughout her career and enjoys lecturing locally and abroad.

    Dr. Rogo-Gupta’s experiences in clinical operations and medical education have given her a unique perspective on faculty development needs at academic medical centers. She is actively involved in the design and implementation of department-wide programs including mentorship and coaching, critical event support, faculty didactics, and the Obstetrics and Gynecology Stanford Network for Advancement and Promotion program.

    Dr. Rogo-Gupta proudly joined Stanford in 2013 following residency at Columbia University and fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she also completed the NIH K30 Graduate Research Training Program. Dr. Rogo-Gupta’s research interests include surgery outcomes and institutional and national levels her work has been widely published and recognized by the American Board of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She currently serves on the Editorial Board of her specialty journal, Urogynecology.

  • Eugene Y. Roh, MD

    Eugene Y. Roh, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTherapeutic Efficacy of biologic treatments(Platelet Rich Plasma, adipose, mfat, bone marrow, stem cell) in OA and tendonitis
    Application of musculoskeletal ultrasound for sports medicine and other musculoskeletal disease.
    AI-based musculoskeletal diagnosis and treatment in sports, OA and tendinitis

  • Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Clinical Professor, Medicine
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioNidhi Rohatgi, MD, MS, SFHM is a Clinical Professor of Medicine and Section Chief for Surgical Co-management (Neurosurgery, Orthopedic surgery, and ENT) in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. She primarily manages medical co-morbidities and strives to prevent medical complications in post-surgical patients in the hospital setting. She has led several quality improvement and clinical research studies and is passionate about finding innovative, cost-efficient and sustainable solutions in healthcare. She serves as an investigator in NIH and industry sponsored clinical trials and is the Director of Clinical Research (Palo Alto) in the Division of Hospital Medicine. She is Affiliated Faculty at the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine and Imaging at Stanford University and Stanford Center for Digital Health. She is an invited speaker at national and international meetings and serves on several national committees. She is the recipient of local, national, and international awards for her work as a clinician, educator, and researcher. She is a strong advocate for patient experience and serves as the Medical Director for the Clinical Advice Services at Stanford Health Care.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Intereststhe overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Dana Nirel Romalis

    Dana Nirel Romalis

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDana Romalis has been a board certified Family Medicine physician since 2004. She enjoys taking care of families throughout all phases of life. Special interests include teaching, collaborative care, preventative medicine, behavioral change, and reproductive and adolescent health. Since 2017, she has been a primary care provider at the Life Connections Health Center in San Jose, caring for Cisco employees and their families.

    She was born and raised in Vancouver, Canada, where she also attended medical school at the University of British Columbia. As an undergraduate at Brandeis University, she double majored in Neuroscience and Psychology, and was captain of the women’s varsity diving team. She did her residency at Montefiore Medical Center’s Residency Program of Social Medicine in the Bronx, NY.

    Prior to joining Stanford’s primary care division in 2017, she worked for 10 years as a physician at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center on their interdisciplinary Valley Homeless Healthcare Program. She is committed to comprehensive and compassionate care for all.

    In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and 2 teenagers, reading, hiking, biking, and volunteering in her community.

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    BioLisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas’ research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement, Co-Director of Community-Engaged Research for the Office of Cancer Health Equity, and Director of the Outreach, Recruitment and Engagement Core for the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Christian Rose, MD

    Christian Rose, MD

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine (Adult Clinical/Academic)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUncertainty permeates the practice of emergency medicine. I want to answer the question: what do you do when you don't know what to do?

  • Jessica Rose

    Jessica Rose

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rose's research investigates neuromuscular mechanisms underlying cerebral palsy (CP) early brain and motor development in preterm children and . Research examines neonatal microstructural brain development on DTI and physiological correlates of motor function in preterm children. Dr. Rose served on the NIH Taskforce on Childhood Motor Disorders, the AACPDM Research Committee and Steering Committee to develop CDE for CP neuroimaging diagnostics, and serves on the Board of Directors of SBMT.

  • Sherri Rose

    Sherri Rose

    Professor of Health Policy

    BioSherri Rose, Ph.D. is a Professor of Health Policy and Co-Director of the Health Policy Data Science Lab at Stanford University. Her research is centered on developing and integrating innovative statistical machine learning approaches to improve human health and health equity. Within health policy, Dr. Rose works on ethical algorithms in health care, risk adjustment, chronic kidney disease, and health program evaluation. She has published interdisciplinary projects across varied outlets, including Biometrics, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Journal of Health Economics, Health Affairs, and New England Journal of Medicine. In 2011, Dr. Rose coauthored the first book on machine learning for causal inference, with a sequel text released in 2018.

    Dr. Rose has been honored with an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, NIH Director's New Innovator Award, the ISPOR Bernie J. O'Brien New Investigator Award, and multiple mid-career awards, including the Gertrude M. Cox Award. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA) and received the Mortimer Spiegelman Award, which recognizes the statistician under age 40 who has made the most significant contributions to public health statistics. In 2024, she received both the ASHEcon Willard G. Manning Memorial Award for Best Research in Health Econometrics and the ASA Outstanding Statistical Application Award. Her research has been featured in The New York Times, USA Today, and The Boston Globe. She was Co-Editor-in-Chief of the journal Biostatistics from 2019-2023.

  • Jennifer Rose-Nussbaumer

    Jennifer Rose-Nussbaumer

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

    BioJennifer Rose-Nussbaumer is a board-certified ophthalmologist and fellowship-trained cornea specialist at the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University. Her clinical practice focuses on corneal transplant, complex cataract surgery and treatment of infectious keratitis. After completing her fellowship in Cornea and External Disease at the University of California, San Francisco, she stayed on faculty and remained there until she transitioned to Stanford in 2021. She continues to collaborate closely with the FI Proctor Foundation as an Associate Proctor Researcher.

    In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Rose-Nussbaumer is an NIH-funded researcher who focuses on randomized clinical trials in ophthalmology. She is the PI on a UG1 grant, Descemet Endothelial Thickness Comparison Trial (DETECT), a randomized clinical trial comparing UT-DSAEK to DMEK and ripasudil versus placebo in patients with endothelial disease such as Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy. She is also the PI on a UG1 grant, the Steroids and Cross-linking for Ulcer Treatment Trial (SCUT II), a randomized clinical trial in collaboration with Aravind Eye hospital in India and the University of Sao Paulo looking at the benefit of adjunctive topical steroids, corneal crosslinking or rose bengal photodynamic therapy in the treatment of infectious ulcers.

    As a native of Northern California, she loves spending time with her family and Bernese Mountain Dog, Kenji, exploring California's natural beauty through hiking and camping.

  • Allyson Rosen, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Allyson Rosen, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

    Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Psych/Public Mental Health & Population Sciences
    Staff, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioRESEARCH FOCUS
    Translational cognitive neuroscience of aging and dementia. Neuroethics.

    TRAINING
    Dr. Rosen is board certified in clinical neuropsychology with a geriatric focus. She completed college at Brown University, a clinical psychology Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University, clinical neuropsychology internship at the Long Island Jewish Hospital in New York, and clinical neuropsychology postdoctoral fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Rosen completed specialty research fellowship training at the National Institute on Aging (Intramural Research Training Award) and Stanford (NRSA F32, K01) in functional imaging and noninvasive brain stimulation with support from NIA.

    CLINICAL AND RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
    Dr. Rosen is Director of Dementia Education at the Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center at the Palo Alto VAHCS. She is also a neuropsychologist and part of the consensus clinical group and education core at the Stanford’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (NIA). Dr. Rosen’s funded research has focused on applying cognitive neuroscience of aging to improve clinical practice in older adults by using cognitive measures, brain imaging, and noninvasive brain stimulation such as TMS. Studies include using fMRI as an outcome measure for cognitive training, studying how to improve the accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting with and without image guidance, and using structural MRI to avoid postoperative cognitive decline and improve outcome from carotid vascular procedures. She has a longstanding commitment to neuroethics and leads a feature in the Journal of Alzheimer Disease that focuses on ethical issues in new and emerging AD applications.

    ETHICS EDITOR, JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
    Ethics Review
    http://www.j-alz.com/blogs/discussion/protecting-progress

    MIRECC DEMENTIA EDUCATION
    http://www.mirecc.va.gov/visn21/education/dementia_education.asp

  • Craig S. Rosen, Ph.D.

    Craig S. Rosen, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research aims at improving processes and outcomes of mental health care for veterans other people suffering from post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders.

    My primary focus is improving access to evidence-based treatments PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. My second emphasis is using telemedicine technologies to expand access to effective care. My third interest is measurement-based care, using ongoing data on patient progress to inform patients' and clinicians' decisions.

  • Glenn Rosen

    Glenn Rosen

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory examines apoptotic and cell signaling pathways in cancer and lung disease. We are studying signaling pathways that regulate oxidative stress responses and cancer cell growth. Part of these studies focus on analysis of non-canonical transcription regulatory functions of the TERC and Tert components of telomerase in lung disease and cancer.

  • Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Stanford University Endowed Professor for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease

    BioI am a pediatric gastroenterologist and physician scientist, who has been devoted to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) research since beginning medical training over 20 years ago. I am also Director of the Stanford Center for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease. I have expertise crossing mucosal immunology and epithelial biology, formal training and experience in clinical and translational investigation with human biospecimens, and direct insight regarding the important clinical challenges caring for children with complicated IBD. My translational research program focuses on how the immune system regulates epithelial function in chronic intestinal inflammation as it relates to IBD. My clinical research program has focused on optimization of anti-TNF therapy in pediatric IBD, and in particular acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC). My laboratory has demonstrated a protective role for IL33, a cytokine that induces type 2 cytokines from T cells an innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), in acute oxazolone colitis through preservation of epithelial goblet cells and barrier function. In line with this finding, we have also shown in a large prospective patient cohort that mucosal expression of type 2 and type 17 immune response genes distinguishes ulcerative colitis (UC) from colon-only Crohn’s disease, and that type 2 gene expression is associated with superior clinical outcome in pediatric UC. We have now developed an organoid-immune cell in vitro culture system to demonstrate the ILC2-dependent mechanism through which IL33 induces goblet cell differentiation in the intestinal epithelium. I led the multicenter study Anti-TNF for Refractory Colitis in Hospitalized Children (ARCH) Study, which aims to establish determinants of anti-TNF response in pediatric ASUC and currently Co-Chair the Crohn's & Colitis Foundations Cohort for Pediatric Translational and Clinical Research in IBD (CAPTURE IBD) and PRO-KIIDS Pediatric IBD clinical research network.

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Fernanda Rossi, Ph.D.

    Fernanda Rossi, Ph.D.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Rossi’s research focuses on developing, evaluating, and implementing assessment tools and interventions to improve the safety and mental health of individuals at risk of intimate partner violence, suicide, and drug overdose. She is particularly interested in using technology and clinical decision support tools to enhance the quality and implementation of intimate partner violence-, suicide-, and substance use-related care.

  • Bernard Roth

    Bernard Roth

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioRoth is one of the founders of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the d.school) and is active in its development: currently, he serves as Academic Director. His design interests include organizing and presenting workshops on creativity, group interactions, and the problem solving process. Formerly he researched the kinematics, dynamics, control, and design of computer controlled mechanical devices. In kinematics, he studied the mathematical theory of rigid body motions and its application to the design of machines.

  • Richard Roth

    Richard Roth

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInsulin is one of the primary regulators of rapid anabolic responses in the body. Defects in the synthesis and/or ability of cells to respond to insulin results in the condition known as diabetes mellitus. To better design methods of treatment for this disorder, we have been focusing our research on how insulin elicits its various biological responses.

  • Stephen J. Roth

    Stephen J. Roth

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)
    On Partial Leave from 06/17/2024 To 07/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRandomized Therapeutic Trials in Pediatric Heart Disease, NIH/U01 GrantNo. HL68285 2001-2006.
    Heparin and the Reduction of Thrombosis (HART) Study. Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.
    A Pilot Trial fo B-type Natriuretic Peptide for Promotion of Urine Output in Diuretic-Resistant Infants Following Cardiovascular Surgery.Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.

  • Walton T. Roth

    Walton T. Roth

    Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaboratory and ambulatory recording of physiological, responses to stressors in anxious and phobic patients.