Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


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  • Oliver O. Aalami, MD

    Oliver O. Aalami, MD

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe launched a national precision medicine PAD trial called, VascTrac (http://vasctrac.stanford.edu/). This trial is mobile phone based and leverages Apple's ResearchKit Platform to monitor a patient's activity both pre- and post-intervention. We are validating mobile phone surveillance for PAD patients and are currently enrolling.

  • Geoffrey Abrams, MD

    Geoffrey Abrams, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Abrams' research is focused on elucidating the pathobiology behind tendinoapthy and developing new treatment modalities for the disease. Specifically, his team is studying the role of micro-RNA as it relates to chronic inflammation and stem cell differentiation in the development and perpetuation of chronic tendinopathy.

  • Ehsan Adeli

    Ehsan Adeli

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research lies in the intersection of Machine Learning, Computer Vision, Healthcare, and Computational Neuroscience.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Al'ai Alvarez, MD, FACEP, FAAEM

    Al'ai Alvarez, MD, FACEP, FAAEM

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioDr. Al'ai Alvarez FACEP FAAEM is an emergency physician and clinical associate professor of Emergency Medicine (EM) at Stanford University. Dr. Alvarez is the Director of Well-Being and co-chair of the Human Potential Team at Stanford Emergency Medicine. He also serves as the Director of the first Physician Wellness Fellowship. His work focuses on humanizing physician roles as individuals and teams through the harnessing of our individual human potential in the context of high-performance teams. His long-term interest is to optimize the interconnectedness between Medical Education, Process Improvement (Quality and Clinical Operations), Recruitment (Diversity), and Well-being (Inclusion) through human-centered design.

    Dr. Alvarez is a faculty fellow at the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign (2021-2022), exploring the role of mindfulness in high-stress environments. He is also the co-director and organizer for the High-Performance Resuscitation Teams Summit (https://bit.ly/HPRT2022) in May 2022 in Chicago, IL, in collaboration with Mayo Clinic and the Mission Critical Teams Institute. The goal of HPRT is to develop a collaborative inquiry among teams from various disciplines, including healthcare, aerospace, sports, military, special operations forces, fire rescue, and other high-performing/elite teams.

    Dr. Alvarez has served as the associate residency program director (APD) at the Stanford Emergency Medicine Residency Program. Among his roles, he served as the second-year class APD and the Medicine Without Walls (MWOW) Line Director for the Stanford Emergency Medicine ACCEL Program (https://emed.stanford.edu/residency/ACCEL.html).

    Dr. Alvarez currently also serves as the chair of WellMD's Physician Wellness Forum and is one of the peer supporters for WellMD's Physician Resource Network (PRN) Support.

    Nationally, Dr. Alvarez serves on committees on physician well-being and diversity, equity, and inclusion in medical education. He is the co-chair of the Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Wellness Leadership Mini-Fellowship, a mentor at the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) Faculty Incubator, and co-founded and co-chairs the largest national diversity mentoring program in EM through the joint American College of Emergency Physician (ACEP)'s Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity (DIHE) and the Emergency Medicine Residents Association (EMRA)'s Diversity Mentorship Initiative.

    Dr. Alvarez has given numerous grand rounds as well as national and international conference lectures and workshops on relevant topics in gratitude, compassion, and belongingness and their role in physician well-being and diversity, equity, and inclusion in medicine.

    Dr. Alvarez is the recipient of the 2019 ACEP DIHE Distance and Impact Award. He is also the recipient of the 2020 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Academy for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Medicine (ADIEM) Outstanding Academician Award. Dr. Alvarez also received the 2020 CORD Academy for Scholarship in Education in EM Academy Member Award on Teaching and Evaluation.

  • Euan A. Ashley

    Euan A. Ashley

    Associate Dean, School of Medicine, Roger and Joelle Burnell Professor of Genomics and Precision Health, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), of Genetics, of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Ashley lab is focused on precision medicine. We develop methods for the interpretation of whole genome sequencing data to improve the diagnosis of genetic disease and to personalize the practice of medicine. At the wet bench, we take advantage of cell systems, transgenic models and microsurgical models of disease to prove causality in biological pathways and find targets for therapeutic development.

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and a Faculty Leader at Stanford’s Center for Longevity. He earned a B.A. cum laude from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford. In 2020, IEEE recognized his work with “The Virtual/Augmented Reality Technical Achievement Award”.

    He has published more than 200 academic papers, spanning the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, linguistics, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for over 20 years.

    Bailenson consults pro bono on Virtual Reality policy for government agencies including the State Department, the US Senate, Congress, the California Supreme Court, the Federal Communication Committee, the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, and the National Institutes of Health.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, emerged as an Amazon Best-seller eight years after its initial publication, and was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for Harvard Business Review, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed six Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab’s research has exhibited publicly at museums and aquariums, including a permanent installation at the San Jose Tech Museum.

  • Steven Banik

    Steven Banik

    Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    BioSteven Banik’s research interests center on rewiring mammalian biology and chemical biotechnology development using molecular design and construction. Projects in the Banik lab combine chemical biology, organic chemistry, protein engineering, cell and molecular biology to precisely manipulate the biological machines present in mammalian cells. Projects broadly aim to perform new functions that shed light on regulatory machinery and the potential scope of mammalian biology. A particular focus is the study of biological mechanisms that can be coopted by synthetic molecules (both small molecules and proteins). These concepts are applied to develop new therapeutic strategies for treating aging-related disorders, genetic diseases, and cancer.

    Prior to joining the faculty at Stanford, Steven was a NIH and Burroughs CASI postdoctoral fellow advised by Prof. Carolyn Bertozzi at Stanford. His postdoctoral research developed approaches for targeted protein degradation from the extracellular space with lysosome targeting chimeras (LYTACs). He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2016, where he worked with Prof. Eric Jacobsen on synthetic methods for the selective, catalytic difluorination of organic molecules and new approaches for generating and controlling reactive cationic intermediates in asymmetric catalysis.

  • Zhenan Bao

    Zhenan Bao

    K. K. Lee Professor, and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry
    On Leave from 10/01/2022 To 12/31/2022

    BioZhenan Bao joined Stanford University in 2004. She is currently a K.K. Lee Professor in Chemical Engineering, and with courtesy appointments in Chemistry and Material Science and Engineering. She has been the Department Chair of Chemical Engineering from 2018. She founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR) and is the current faculty director. She is also an affiliated faculty member of Precourt Institute, Woods Institute, ChEM-H and Bio-X. Professor Bao received her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from The University of Chicago in 1995 and joined the Materials Research Department of Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. She became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2001. Professor Bao currently has more than 700 refereed publications and more than 100 US patents with a Google Scholar H-index 190.

    Bao is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Inventors. Bao was elected a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Science in 2021. She is a Fellow of AAAS, ACS, MRS, SPIE, ACS POLY and ACS PMSE.

    Bao is a member of the Board of Directors for the Camille and Dreyfus Foundation from 2022. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She was an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Polymer Reviews and Synthetic Metals. She serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, ACS Nano, Accounts of Chemical Reviews, Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials, Chemical Communications, Journal of American Chemical Society, Nature Asian Materials, Materials Horizon and Materials Today. She is one of the Founders and currently sits on the Board of Directors of C3 Nano Co. and PyrAmes, both are silicon valley venture funded companies.

    Bao was a recipient of the VinFuture Prize Female Innovator 2022, ACS Award of Chemistry of Materials 2022, MRS Mid-Career Award in 2021, AICHE Alpha Chi Sigma Award 2021, ACS Central Science Disruptor and Innovator Prize in 2020, ACS Gibbs Medal in 2020, the Wilhelm Exner Medal from the Austrian Federal Minister of Science in 2018, the L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award North America Laureate in 2017. She was awarded the ACS Applied Polymer Science Award in 2017, ACS Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013 ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine Editors Choice Best of the Best new technology for 2001.

  • Annelise E. Barron

    Annelise E. Barron

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiophysical mechanisms of host defense peptides (a.k.a. antimicrobial peptides) and their peptoid mimics; also, molecular and cellular biophysics of human innate immune responses.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Radiology

    BioProfessor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). She is now the Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H.

    Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, and the Chemistry of the Future Solvay Prize, among others.

    The Bertozzi Group develops chemical tools to study the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammation, tuberculosis and most recently COVID-19. She is the inventor of "bioorthogonal chemistry", a class of chemical reactions compatible with living systems that enable molecular imaging and drug targeting. Her group also developed new therapeutic modalities for targeted degradation of extracellular biomolecules, such as antibody-enzyme conjugates and Lysosome Targeting Chimeras (LYTACs). As well, her group studies NGly1 deficiency, a rare genetic disease characterized by loss of the human N-glycanase.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi cofounded Redwood Bioscience, Enable Biosciences, Palleon Pharmaceuticals, InterVenn Bio, OliLux Bio, Grace Science LLC and Lycia Therapeutics. She is also a member of the Board of Directors of Lilly.

  • Nidhi Bhutani

    Nidhi Bhutani

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of our research is to understand the fundamental mechanisms that govern and reprogram cellular fate during development, regeneration and disease.

  • Sarah Billington

    Sarah Billington

    UPS Foundation Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioOur group studies the impact of building design, materials, and symbols on human wellbeing including stress, physical activity, creativity, sense of belonging, and pro-environmental behavior. We are exploring how buildings can include both physical and digital adaptations to improve wellbeing outcomes including new methods of bringing nature and the experience of nature into buildings. We are interested in how building management systems can be extended beyond providing energy savings, thermal comfort, and security to support and maintain a broader set of human wellbeing outcomes while preserving occupant privacy. Further, we are studying the impact of built features, including historic structures, on community wellbeing and methods of design for community wellbeing that support the equitable development of affordable and permanent supportive housing.

    Our group also has a long history of expertise in the design and evaluation of sustainable, durable construction materials, their application to structures and construction, including damage-tolerant, high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composite materials, and bio-based fiber-reinforced polymeric composites and insulating foams that have a closed loop life-cycle.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor, Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Barbara Block

    Barbara Block

    Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Professor of Marine Sciences, Professor of Oceans and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThermal physiology, open ocean predators, ecological physiology and tuna biology

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic and clinical research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how they affect short-term brain injury and long term outcomes like dementia and depression.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    BioDavid B. Camarillo is Associate Professor of Bioengineering, (by courtesy) Mechanical Engineering and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Camarillo holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Biophysics at the UCSF and Biodesign Innovation at Stanford. Dr. Camarillo worked in the surgical robotics industry at Intuitive Surgical and Hansen Medical, before launching his laboratory at Stanford in 2012. His current research focuses on precision human measurement for multiple clinical and physiological areas including the brain, heart, lungs, and reproductive system. Dr. Camarillo has been awarded the Hellman Fellowship, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program award, among other honors including multiple best paper awards in brain injury and robotic surgery. His research has been funded by the NIH, NSF, DoD, as well as corporations and private philanthropy. His lab’s research has been featured on NPR, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Science News, ESPN, and TED.com as well as other media outlets aimed at education of the public.

  • Jennifer Carlson

    Jennifer Carlson

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Adolescent Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests and scholarship fall into two major "buckets" of activity: 1) confidentiality and clinical informatics and 2) eating disorders, particularly the Female/Male Athlete Triad.

  • Akshay Chaudhari

    Akshay Chaudhari

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Chaudhari is interested in the application of artificial intelligence techniques to all aspects of medical imaging, including automated schedule and reading prioritization, image reconstruction, quantitative analysis, and prediction of patient outcomes. His interests range from developing novel data-efficient machine learning algorithms to clinical deployment and validation of patient outcomes. He is also exploring combining imaging with clinical, natural language, and time series data.

  • Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Ovijit Chaudhuri

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the physics of cell migration, division, and morphogenesis in 3D, as well cell-matrix mechanotransduction, or the process by which cells sense and respond to mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices. For both these areas, we use engineered biomaterials for 3D culture as artificial extracellular matrices.

  • Constance Chu, MD

    Constance Chu, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery (Sports Medicine)

    BioDr. Constance R. Chu is Professor and Vice Chair Research, in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Stanford University. She is also Director of the Joint Preservation Center and Chief of Sports Medicine at the VA Palo Alto. Previously, she was the Albert Ferguson Endowed Chair and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a clinician-scientist who is both principal investigator of several projects funded by the National Institutes of Health and who has been recognized as a Castle-Connelly/US News and World Report “Top Doctor” in Orthopedic Surgery as well as on Becker’s list of Top Knee Surgeons in the United States. Her clinical practice focuses on the knee: primarily restoration and reconstruction of the ACL, menisci and cartilage. She graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School.

    As Director of the multi-disciplinary Joint Preservation Center structured to seamlessly integrate the latest advances in biologics, mechanics, and imaging with comprehensive patient centered musculoskeletal and orthopedic care, Dr. Chu aims to develop a new model for health care delivery, research and education with an emphasis on health promotion and prevention. Cornerstones of this program include teamwork and a focus on personalized medicine. A central goal is to transform the clinical approach to osteoarthritis from palliation to prevention. In addition to optimizing clinical operations, outstanding research is critical to developing more effective new treatments. Towards this end, Dr. Chu is leading innovative translational research from bench to bedside in three main areas: quantitative imaging and biomarker development for early diagnosis and staging of joint and cartilage injury and degeneration; cartilage tissue engineering and stem cell based cartilage repair; and molecular and biological therapies for joint restoration and joint rejuvenation. Her research efforts have led to more than 30 professional awards and honors to include a Kappa Delta Award, considered to be the highest research honor in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Dr. Chu also regularly holds leadership and committee positions in major professional organizations such as the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopedic Association (AOA). In her subspecialty of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, she is a past President of the Forum Sports Focus Group, a member of the Herodicus Society of leaders in Sports Medicine, and immediate past Chair of the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Research Council. She is alumnus of the AOA American, British, Canadian (ABC) and the AOSSM Traveling Fellowships.

  • Todd Coleman

    Todd Coleman

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioTodd P. Coleman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, and by courtesy, Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received B.S. degrees in electrical engineering (summa cum laude), as well as computer engineering (summa cum laude) from the University of Michigan. He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in electrical engineering and computer science. He did postdoctoral studies at MIT and Mass General Hospital in quantitative neuroscience. He previously was a faculty member in the Departments of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the University of California, San Diego, respectively. Dr. Coleman’s research is very multi-disciplinary, using tools from applied probability, physiology, and bioelectronics. Examples include, for instance, optimal transport methods in high-dimensional uncertainty quantification and developing technologies and algorithms to monitor and modulate physiology of the nervous systems in the brain and visceral organs. He has served as a Principal Investigator on grants from the NSF, NIH, Department of Defense, and multiple private foundations. Dr. Coleman is an inventor on 10 granted US patents. He has been selected as a Gilbreth Lecturer for the National Academy of Engineering, a TEDMED speaker, and a Fellow of IEEE as well as the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is currently the Chair of the National Academies Standing Committee on Biotechnology Capabilities and National Security Needs.

  • Steven Hartley Collins

    Steven Hartley Collins

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioSteve Collins is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, where he teaches courses on design and robotics and directs the Stanford Biomechatronics Laboratory. His primary focus is to speed and systematize the design and prescription of prostheses and exoskeletons using versatile device emulator hardware and human-in-the-loop optimization algorithms (Zhang et al. 2017, Science). Another interest is efficient autonomous devices, such as highly energy-efficient walking robots (Collins et al. 2005, Science) and exoskeletons that use no energy yet reduce the metabolic energy cost of human walking (Collins et al. 2015, Nature).

    Prof. Collins received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 from Cornell University, where he performed undergraduate research on passive dynamic walking robots. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 2008 from the University of Michigan, where he performed research on the dynamics and control of human walking. He performed postdoctoral research on humanoid robots at T. U. Delft in the Netherlands. He was a professor of Mechanical Engineering and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University for seven years. In 2017, he joined the faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University.

    Prof. Collins is a member of the Scientific Board of Dynamic Walking and the Editorial Board of Science Robotics. He has received the Young Scientist Award from the American Society of Biomechanics, the Best Medical Devices Paper from the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, and the student-voted Professor of the Year in his department.

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Alia Crum

    Alia Crum

    Associate Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Primary Care & Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab focuses on how subjective mindsets (e.g., thoughts, beliefs and expectations) can alter objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms. We are interested in understanding how mindsets affect important outcomes both within and beyond the realm of medicine, in the domains such as exercise, diet and stress. https://mbl.stanford.edu/

  • Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Dandekar is the Associate Director of Sports Psychiatry and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University. After graduating summa cum laude from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, he earned a Regents Scholarship to complete his M.D. at UC San Diego, where he received the American Academy of Neurology’s Prize for Excellence. During his residency and fellowship at Stanford, Dr. Dandekar provided care to a variety of patients utilizing a combination of medication management, psychotherapy, and lifestyle changes (sleep, nutrition, exercise, recovery). Teamed with Clinical Professor Dr. Douglas Noordsy, he helped to incorporate psychiatric services into Stanford's sports psychology program, and continues to see elite athletes as part of the Stanford Sports Psychiatry Clinic. He also specializes in treating physicians, and sees many residents, fellows, and attendings in his private practice. In his free time, he enjoys playing tennis, chess, and guitar.

  • Reinhold Dauskardt

    Reinhold Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2022 To 03/31/2023

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Luis de Lecea

    Luis de Lecea

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical and Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab uses molecular, optogenetic, anatomical and behavioral methods to identify and manipulate the neuronal circuits underlying brain arousal, with particular attention to sleep and wakefulness transitions. We are also interested in the changes that occur in neuronal circuits in conditions of hyperarousal such as stress and drug addiction.

  • Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Director, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance at Stanford, James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Bioengineering, of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and computational approaches to study human movement. Development of biomechanical models to analyze muscle function, study movement abnormalities, design medical products, and guide surgery. Imaging and health technology development. Discovering the principles of peak performance to advance human health. Human performance research. Wearable technologies, video motion capture, and machine learning to enable large-scale analysis.

  • Joseph M. DeSimone

    Joseph M. DeSimone

    Sanjiv Sam Gambhir Professor of Translational Medicine, Professor of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemistry, of Materials Science and Engineering, and of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business

    BioJoseph M. DeSimone is the Sanjiv Sam Gambhir Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Engineering at Stanford University. He holds appointments in the Departments of Radiology and Chemical Engineering with courtesy appointments in the Department of Chemistry and in Stanford’s Graduate School of Business.

    The DeSimone laboratory's research efforts are focused on developing innovative, interdisciplinary solutions to complex problems centered around advanced polymer 3D fabrication methods. In Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, the lab is pursuing new capabilities in digital 3D printing, as well as the synthesis of new polymers for use in advanced additive technologies. In Translational Medicine, research is focused on exploiting 3D digital fabrication tools to engineer new vaccine platforms, enhanced drug delivery approaches, and improved medical devices for numerous conditions, with a current major focus in pediatrics. Complementing these research areas, the DeSimone group has a third focus in Entrepreneurship, Digital Transformation, and Manufacturing.

    Before joining Stanford in 2020, DeSimone was a professor of chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and of chemical engineering at North Carolina State University. He is also Co-founder, Board Chair, and former CEO (2014 - 2019) of the additive manufacturing company, Carbon. DeSimone is responsible for numerous breakthroughs in his career in areas including green chemistry, medical devices, nanomedicine, and 3D printing. He has published over 350 scientific articles and is a named inventor on over 200 issued patents. Additionally, he has mentored 80 students through Ph.D. completion in his career, half of whom are women and members of underrepresented groups in STEM.

    In 2016 DeSimone was recognized by President Barack Obama with the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the highest U.S. honor for achievement and leadership in advancing technological progress. He has received numerous other major awards in his career, including the U.S. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award (1997); the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention (2005); the Lemelson-MIT Prize (2008); the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award (2009); the AAAS Mentor Award (2010); the Heinz Award for Technology, the Economy and Employment (2017); the Wilhelm Exner Medal (2019); the EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award (2019 U.S. Overall National Winner); and the Harvey Prize in Science and Technology (2020). He is one of only 25 individuals elected to all three branches of the U.S. National Academies (Sciences, Medicine, Engineering). DeSimone received his B.S. in Chemistry in 1986 from Ursinus College and his Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1990 from Virginia Tech.

  • Joseph P. Donahue

    Joseph P. Donahue

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Donahue is a Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon with Subspecialty Certification in Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. He is fellowship trained and specializes in Arthroscopic and Minimally Invasive Reconstructive Surgery of the Shoulder and Knee, and Sports Medicine.

    Dr. Donahue received his undergraduate degree from Stanford University and his Doctor of Medicine from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed his residency in Orthopedic Surgery at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center (NYC), Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (NYC), and the Alfred I. duPont Institute (DE), and went on to a fellowship in Orthopedic Sports Medicine at the Stanford/SOAR Sports Medicine Fellowship Program.

    Dr. Donahue’s interests include arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder and knee. He specializes in anterior cruciate ligament injuries, shoulder instability, and rotator cuff tears. He has done research on both shoulder instability and rotator cuff tears and has developed new techniques and medical devices for rotator cuff and all soft tissue repairs. He has started and actively serves on the medical advisory board for several surgical device companies and continues to design new surgical devices for arthroscopic procedures. He has authored several device patents and journal articles.

    Dr. Donahue has been a member of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and a Diplomat of the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery. He is also member of the Arthroscopy Association of North America, the American Orthopedic Society of Sports Medicine, the California Orthopedic Association, The International Knee Society, the California Medical Association, and the Santa Clara Medical Society.

    Dr. Donahue has served as the Program Director of the SOAR Orthopedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. He has served as the Director of Santa Clara University’s Sports Medicine Program and the Head Team Physician for all of Santa Clara University’s athletic teams, a team physician for the San Francisco 49ers, the San Francisco Giants, the Stanford Athletic Department, and many other area collegiate and high school teams.

  • Alfredo Dubra, PhD

    Alfredo Dubra, PhD

    Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab seeks to help the early diagnosing and monitoring progression of ocular, vascular, neurodegenerative and systemic diseases through novel non-invasive optical ophthalmic imaging. We pursue this goal through a multidisciplinary approach that integrates optics, computer science, vision science, electrical engineering and other engineering disciplines.

  • Johannes C. Eichstaedt

    Johannes C. Eichstaedt

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use large-scale language analyses and machine learning to characterize disease risk, measure subjective well-being and mental health of populations, and enrich and test psychological theory. I focus on applications of these methods that inform public health and public policy, and to create health systems that are more responsive to mental illness.

  • Antoine Falisse

    Antoine Falisse

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bioengineering

    BioDr. Falisse is a postdoctoral fellow in Bioengineering working on computational approaches to study human movement disorders. He primarily uses optimization methods, biomechanical modeling, and data from various sources (wearables, videos, medical images) to get insights into movement abnormalities and design innovative treatments and rehabilitation protocols.

    Dr. Falisse received his PhD from KU Leuven (Belgium) where he worked on modeling and simulating the locomotion of children with cerebral palsy. His research was supported by the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) through a personal fellowship. Dr. Falisse received several awards for his PhD work, including the David Winter Young Investigator Award, the Andrzej J. Komor Young Investigator Award, the VPHi Thesis Award in In Silico Medicine, and the KU Leuven Research Council Award in Biomedical Sciences.

  • Chelsea Finn

    Chelsea Finn

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioChelsea Finn is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and the William George and Ida Mary Hoover Faculty Fellow. Professor Finn's research interests lie in the ability to enable robots and other agents to develop broadly intelligent behavior through learning and interaction. Her work lies at the intersection of machine learning and robotic control, including topics such as end-to-end learning of visual perception and robotic manipulation skills, deep reinforcement learning of general skills from autonomously collected experience, and meta-learning algorithms that can enable fast learning of new concepts and behaviors. Professor Finn received her Bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and her PhD in Computer Science at UC Berkeley. Her research has been recognized through the ACM doctoral dissertation award, an NSF graduate fellowship, a Facebook fellowship, the C.V. Ramamoorthy Distinguished Research Award, and the MIT Technology Review 35 under 35 Award, and her work has been covered by various media outlets, including the New York Times, Wired, and Bloomberg. Throughout her career, she has sought to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities within CS and AI by developing an AI outreach camp at Berkeley for underprivileged high school students, a mentoring program for underrepresented undergraduates across three universities, and leading efforts within the WiML and Berkeley WiCSE communities of women researchers.

    Website: https://ai.stanford.edu/~cbfinn

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and of Medicine (Microbiology and Immunology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe human microbiome is linked to a range of phenotypes in the host, but it remains difficult to test causality and explore the mechanisms of these interactions. Our lab focuses on two research areas that share a common goal of studying host-microbiota interactions at the level of molecular mechanism:

    1) Technology development. Much of what we know about biology has been learned by deleting individual genes from mice, worms, flies and yeast. The ability to do single-strain and single-gene deletion in the microbiome would be transformative but does not yet exist. We are developing technology in three areas to make this possible:

    Synthetic ecology: There is a pressing need for model systems for the microbiome that are defined, but of an order of complexity that approaches the native state. Key experiments in the field often show that a host phenotype can be transferred to a germ-free mouse via fecal transplant. If these phenomena could be recapitulated with a defined, high-complexity community, then reductionist experiments to probe mechanism would be possible. We are developing the technology required to build highly complex defined communities (100-200 bacterial species), make them stable upon transplantation into mice, and probe their function in vitro and in vivo.

    Genetics: It is difficult to probe mechanism without genetics, and genetic tools exist for only ~10% of the bacterial species in the gut and skin microbiome. We are developing technologies that will make it possible to delete and insert genes, and build mutant libraries, in many of the most common bacterial strains in the gut and skin microbiome.

    Computation: In previous work from the lab, we have developed computational algorithms that identify small-molecule-producing genes in bacterial genomes. In current work, we are devising algorithms for genome mining that are specific to the microbiome, and new tools for predicting the chemical structures of small molecules from untargeted metabolomics data.

    2) Molecular mechanisms. Many of the early findings in microbiome research are correlative or associative. We are applying the tools described above to explore the mechanisms underlying these phenomena:

    Small molecules: Our lab has had a long-standing interest in small molecules from the microbiota. These include: 1) host-derived molecules metabolized by the microbiome, like bile acids; 2) characteristic components of the bacterial membrane and cell wall, including LPS and capsular polysaccharides; and 3) hundreds of other diffusible small molecules (e.g., the products of polysaccharide and amino acid metabolism) that are present in the bloodstream at high concentrations. Our work in this area seeks to establish the mechanisms by which these molecules modulate host biology, especially by deleting them one at a time in the background of a complex community; and to discover new microbiome-derived metabolites present in the bloodstream and host tissues.

    Ecology of complex communities: Synthetic ecology at the 100+ strain scale is entirely unexplored, and the emergent properties of complex communities are not well understood. Our work in this area seeks to understand basic principles outlined by the following questions: How many meaningful interactions exist in a community of hundreds of strains? What constitutes a niche, molecularly and spatially, and how do strains map to niches? What are the molecular correlates of stability, and how does a community reconfigure in response to a perturbation? How rare or common are stable states, and how predictable is the process by which a consortium will evolve toward a stable state? To what extent do priority effects (early colonists and events) determine the outcome of ecosystem development? Can the results of ecosystem competition be predicted or engineered?

  • Michael Fredericson, MD

    Michael Fredericson, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the etiology, prevention, and treatment of overuse sports injuries in athletes and lifestyle medicine practices for improved health and longevity.

  • Michael T. Freehill, MD, FAOA

    Michael T. Freehill, MD, FAOA

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Freehill is a board-certified, double fellowship-trained specialist in orthopaedic surgery with a sub-specialty certification in sports medicine. His concentration is in shoulder and elbow. Dr. Freehill is a team physician for the Stanford University athletics program and head physician for the Stanford University baseball team. Dr. Freehill also teaches in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Freehill’s practice focuses on all shoulder conditions. He treats rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, shoulder arthritis, sports shoulder, arthopathy, complex shoulder pathology, and sports-related shoulder injury. In addition, he is also passionate about sports- related elbow injuries, with an emphasis on thrower’s elbow.

    Professional and amateur athletes, as well as non-athletes, come to Dr. Freehill for expert care. His sports medicine training and specialization in shoulder replacement procedures enable him to treat patients across the lifespan. Depending on factors including the patient’s condition and occupation, he may recommend treatment ranging from non-operative solutions (such as physical therapy) to cutting-edge biologics procedures or complex surgery.

    In addition to his positions within the Stanford University athletics program, Dr. Freehill serves as assistant team physician for the Oakland A’s. Previously, he was a team physician for the Detroit Tigers and the Winston-Salem Dash (affiliated with the Chicago White Sox); he assisted with the Baltimore Orioles. He has also served as Director of Sports Medicine for Wake Forest University Athletics.

    As director of the imminent Stanford Performance and Pitching Lab, Dr. Freehill draws on his previous experience as a professional baseball player to help athletes of all skill levels. In the lab, he conducts cutting edge research on the biomechanics of overhead throwers in order to support advances in throwing performance. He has conducted a study on pitch counts in adolescent players funded by Major League Baseball. Dr. Freehill was also awarded a research grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate stromal vascular fractionated mesenchymal cells and their potential for healing rotator cuff tendon tears.

    Dr. Freehill has pioneered the use of some of the latest techniques and technology for leading-edge care. Among the advanced technologies he utilizes is a virtual reality (VR) system that enables him to perform a simulated shoulder arthroplasty procedure prior to entering the operating room with a patient. The system also enables him to predict and order customized implants if needed, which is believed to enable a more positive outcome for patients.

    Peer-reviewed articles authored by Dr. Freehill explore rotator cuff injuries, shoulder arthroplasty, baseball-related injuries and performance interests, and more. His work has been featured in the American Journal of Sports Medicine, the Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Arthroscopy, and elsewhere. He has written numerous book chapters and made over 200 presentations at conferences around the world.
    Dr. Freehill’s honors include an Orthopaedic Residency Research Award while at Johns Hopkins University. He is also a Neer Award winner, denoting the highest research award selected annually by the American Shoulder and Elbow Society.

    Currently, he serves on the Medical Publishing Board of Trustees for the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He is a member of the American Orthopaedic Association, and the Major League Baseball Team Physician Association. He is a committee member for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Society, International Congress of Arthroscopy and Sports Traumatology, the Arthroscopy Association of North America, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  • Xiaojing Gao

    Xiaojing Gao

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we design biological systems as “smart medicine” that sense patients’ states, process the information, and respond accordingly? To realize this vision, we will tackle fundamental challenges across different levels of complexity, such as (1) protein components that minimize their crosstalk with human cells and immunogenicity, (2) biomolecular circuits that function robustly in different cells and are easy to deliver, (3) multicellular consortia that communicate through scalable channels, and (4) therapeutic modules that interface with physiological inputs/outputs. Our engineering targets include biomolecules, molecular circuits, viruses, and cells, and our approach combines quantitative experimental analysis with computational simulation. The molecular tools we build will be applied to diverse fields such as neurobiology and cancer therapy.

  • Christopher Gardner

    Christopher Gardner

    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of nutrition in individual and societal health, with particular interests in: plant-based diets, differential response to low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss diets by insulin resistance status, chronic disease prevention, randomized controlled trials, human nutrition, community based studies, Community Based Participatory Research, sustainable food movement (animal rights and welfare, global warming, human labor practices), stealth health, nutrition policy, nutrition guidelines

  • Justin Gardner

    Justin Gardner

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow does neural activity in the human cortex create our sense of visual perception? We use a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, computational modeling and analysis, and psychophysical measurements to link human perception to cortical brain activity.

  • Jamshid Ghajar

    Jamshid Ghajar

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrincipal Investigator,
    “Concussion Definition Consortium – An Evidence Based Project”. Department of Defense. There are over 40 definitions of concussion but none are evidence based- i.e. come from well done studies. We will extract the most salient data from well run studies that are designed to give us a "snapshot" of what concussion is.


    Principal Investigator,
    “Multi-Dimensional Model for Brain Trauma”. The goal is to develop a dynamic model for concussion, validate it on a retrospective dataset, and design a second study to validate it on a prospective dataset. Department of Defense.


    Principal Investigator,
    “EYE-TRAC Advance”. Testing 10,000 subjects with normal and post concussive eye tracking. Military and civilian athletes are included. Department of Defense.

    Principal Investigator,
    B-TEC (Brain Trauma Evidence-based Consortium). Combines Stanford B-TEC clinical trials coordinating center with the Brain Trauma Foundation's B-TEC evidence-based center to promote and coordinate an evidence-based approach to the spectrum of brain trauma from concussion to coma.

  • Nicholas Giori MD, PhD

    Nicholas Giori MD, PhD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOsteoarthritis
    Medical Device Development

  • Garry Gold

    Garry Gold

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary focus is application of new MR imaging technology to musculoskeletal problems. Current projects include: Rapid MRI for Osteoarthritis, Weight-bearing cartilage imaging with MRI, and MRI-based models of muscle. We are studying the application of new MR imaging techniques such as rapid imaging, real-time imaging, and short echo time imaging to learn more about biomechanics and pathology of bones and joints. I am also interested in functional imaging approaches using PET-MRI.

  • Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski

    Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    BioDr. Goldstein-Piekarski directs the Computational Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and Sleep Laboratory (CoPsyN Sleep Lab) as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine and PI within the Sierra-Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) at the Palo Alto VA. She received her PhD in 2014 at the University of California, Berkeley where she studied the consequences of sleep on emotional brain function. She then completed a Postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford focusing on understanding the brain basis of anxiety and depression.

    As the director of the CoPsyN Sleep Lab she is developing a translational, interdisciplinary research program that combines human neuroimaging, high-density EEG sleep recording, and computational modeling to understand the neural mechanisms through which sleep disruption contributes to affective disorders, particularly depression, across the lifespan. The ultimate goals of this research are to (1) develop mechanistically-informed interventions that directly target aspects of sleep and brain function to prevent and treat affective disorders and (2) identify novel biomarkers which can identify which individuals are most likely to experience improved mood following targeted sleep interventions.

    This work is currently supported by The KLS Foundation, a R01 from National Institute of Mental Health, and a R61 from the National Institute of Mental Health.

  • Gerald Grant, MD, FACS

    Gerald Grant, MD, FACS

    Botha Chan Endowed Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Grant directs a Blood-brain Barrier Translational Laboratory focusing on enhancing drug delivery to brain tumors in children.

  • Eric R. Gross

    Eric R. Gross

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA part of the laboratory studies organ injury and how common genetic variants may affect the response to injury caused by surgery; particularly aldehydes. Aldehyde accumulation can cause many post-operative complications that people experience during surgery- whether it be reperfusion injury, post-operative pain, cognitive dysfunction, or nausea. The other part of the lab studies the impact of e-cigarettes and alcohol, when coupled with genetics, on the cardiopulmonary system.

  • James Gross

    James Gross

    Ernest R. Hilgard Professor and Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in emotion and emotion regulation. My research employs behavioral, physiological, and brain measures to examine emotion-related personality processes and individual differences. My current interests include emotion coherence, specific emotion regulation strategies (reappraisal, suppression), automatic emotion regulation, and social anxiety.

  • Hyowon Gweon

    Hyowon Gweon

    Associate Professor of Psychology
    On Leave from 10/01/2022 To 12/31/2022

    BioHyowon (Hyo) Gweon (she/her) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology. As a leader of the Social Learning Lab, Hyo is broadly interested in how humans learn from others and help others learn: What makes human social learning so powerful, smart, and distinctive? Taking an interdisciplinary approach that combines developmental, computational, and neuroimaging methods, her research aims to explain the cognitive underpinnings of distinctively human learning, communication, and prosocial behaviors.

    Hyo received her PhD in Cognitive Science (2012) from MIT, where she continued as a post-doc before joining Stanford in 2014. She has been named as a Richard E. Guggenhime Faculty Scholar (2020) and a David Huntington Dean's Faculty Scholar (2019); she is a recipient of the APS Janet Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions (2020), Jacobs Early Career Fellowship (2020), James S. McDonnell Scholar Award for Human Cognition (2018), APA Dissertation Award (2014), and Marr Prize (best student paper, Cognitive Science Society 2010).

  • Nicholas Haber

    Nicholas Haber

    Assistant Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use AI models of of exploratory and social learning in order to better understand early human learning and development, and conversely, I use our understanding of early human learning to make robust AI models that learn in exploratory and social ways. Based on this, I develop AI-powered learning tools for children, geared in particular towards the education of those with developmental issues such as the Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in the mold of my work on the Autism Glass Project. My formal graduate training in pure mathematics involved extending partial differential equation theory in cases involving the propagation of waves through complex media such as the space around a black hole. Since then, I have transitioned to the use of machine learning in developing both learning tools for children with developmental disorders and AI and cognitive models of learning.

  • Francois Haddad

    Francois Haddad

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Francois Haddad, MD is a Clinical Professor of Medicine that specializes in the field of cardio-vascular imaging, pulmonary hypertension, advanced heart failure and transplantation. Dr. Haddad has over 18 years of practice in the field of cardiology. He directs Stanford Cardiovascular Institute Biomarker and Phenotypic Core Laboratory dedicated to translational studies in cardiovascular medicine. The laboratory focuses on (1) identifying early biomarkers of heart failure and aging, (2) bioengineering approaches to cardiovascular disease modeling and (3) novel informatic approach for the detection and risk stratification of disease. He is involved is several precision medicine initiatives in health including the Project Baseline, the Integrated Personalized Omics Profiling Initiative, the Athletic screening program at Stanford and the Strong-D cardiac rehabilitation initiative in individuals with diabetes mellitus.

  • Lou Halamek

    Lou Halamek

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. development of hospital operations centers coupled with sophisticated simulation capabilities
    2. re-creation of near misses and adverse events
    3. optimizing human and system performance during resuscitation
    4. optimizing pattern recognition and situational awareness at the bedside
    5. evaluation and optimization of debriefing
    6. patient simulator design

  • Nicos Haralabidis

    Nicos Haralabidis

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Bioengineering

    BioMy research interests lie within both sports and clinical biomechanics applications. I rely upon merging conventional biomechanical in vivo measurements together with state-of-the-art musculoskeletal modeling and optimal control simulation approaches. The integrative approach I take enables me to understand how an individual may run faster, jump further, walk following surgery or intervention, and simultaneously estimate internal body dynamics noninvasively. As a Postdoctoral Research Scholar within the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance I aim to explore how stochastic optimal control and reinforcement learning methods can be applied to further our understanding of sporting performance.

  • Brian A. Hargreaves

    Brian A. Hargreaves

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications and augmented reality applications in medicine. These include abdominal, breast and musculoskeletal imaging, which require development of faster, quantitative, and more efficient MRI methods that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. My work includes novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods and reconstruction tools and augmented reality in medicine.

  • H. Craig Heller

    H. Craig Heller

    Lorry I. Lokey/Business Wire Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurobiology of sleep, circadian rhythms, regulation of body temperature, mammalian hibernation, and human exercise physiology. Currently applying background in sleep and circadian neurobiology the understanding and correcting the learning disability of Down Syndrome.

  • Jaimie Henderson, MD

    Jaimie Henderson, MD

    John and Jene Blume - Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor, Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests encompass several areas of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery, including frameless stereotactic approaches for therapy delivery to deep brain nuclei; cortical physiology and its relationship to normal and pathological movement; brain-computer interfaces; and the development of novel neuromodulatory techniques for the treatment of movement disorders, epilepsy, pain, and other neurological diseases.

  • Jennifer Hicks

    Jennifer Hicks

    Deputy Director, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance

    Current Role at StanfordDeputy Director, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance at Stanford
    Director of Research, Mobilize Center
    Directory of Research, Restore Center
    Research and Development Manager, OpenSim Project

  • SM Hadi Hosseini

    SM Hadi Hosseini

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab’s research portfolio crosses multiple disciplines including computational neuropsychiatry, cognitive neuroscience, multimodal neuroimaging and neurocognitive rehabilitation. Our computational neuropsychiatry research mainly involves investigating alterations in the organization of connectome in various neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive disorders using state of the art neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, sMRI, DWI, functional NIRS) combined with novel computational methods (graph theoretical and multivariate pattern analyses).

    The ultimate goal of our research is to translate the findings from computational neuropsychiatry research toward developing personalized interventions. We have been developing personalized interventions that integrate computerized cognitive rehabilitation, real-time functional brain imaging and neurofeedback, as well as virtual reality (VR) tailored toward targeted rehabilitation of the affected brain networks in patients with neurocognitive disorders.

  • KC Huang

    KC Huang

    Professor of Bioengineering and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do cells determine their shape and grow?
    How do molecules inside cells get to the right place at the right time?

    Our group tries to answer these questions using a systems biology approach, in which we integrate interacting networks of protein and lipids with the physical forces determined by the spatial geometry of the cell. We use theoretical and computational techniques to make predictions that we can verify experimentally using synthetic, chemical, or genetic perturbations.

  • Ngan F. Huang

    Ngan F. Huang

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Cardiothoracic Surgery Research) and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Huang's laboratory aims to understand the chemical and mechanical interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and pluripotent stem cells that regulate vascular and myogenic differentiation. The fundamental insights of cell-matrix interactions are applied towards stem cell-based therapies with respect to improving cell survival and regenerative capacity, as well as engineered vascularized tissues for therapeutic transplantation.

  • Andrew D. Huberman

    Andrew D. Huberman

    Associate Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) We study neural regeneration with the goal of developing treatments to prevent and reverse vision loss. (e.g., Huberman, Nature 2020; Laha and Huberman, Science, 2017; Lim et al., Nature Neuroscience, 2016).

    2) We are parsing the neural circuits for anxiety, and visually-driven autonomic arousal, (e.g., Salay et al., Nature, 2018; Yilmaz-Balban et al., Current Biology, 2021).

  • Doug James

    Doug James

    Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Music

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComputer graphics & animation, physics-based sound synthesis, computational physics, haptics, reduced-order modeling

  • Deborah Kado

    Deborah Kado

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr. Kado is a board-certified, fellowship-trained doctor specializing in geriatrics. She serves as co-director of the Stanford Longevity Center. She is a professor of medicine and co-chief of the Geriatric Section of the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health.

    For each patient, Dr. Kado prepares a personalized care plan. Her objective is to help all individuals maintain the best possible health and quality of life as they age.

    A special interest of Dr. Kado is bone health. She has conducted extensive research focused on osteoporosis and the related disorder hyperkyphosis.
    Since joining the UCLA faculty in 2000, she has received continuous funding for her research from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

    She has over 100 peer-reviewed publications of her research findings in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Osteoporosis International, Journal of Gerontology and Medical Sciences, Journal of Geriatric Oncology, Nature Communications, and other peer-reviewed journals.

    In 2007, she defined hyperkyphosis as a new geriatric syndrome. Her discoveries in this field were first featured in the American College or Physician’s premier internal medicine journal Annals of Internal Medicine. Later, they also appeared in a dedicated chapter in UpToDate, the electronic resource providing evidence-based clinical decision support for doctors worldwide.

    Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Kado practiced at UC San Diego where she started a dedicated osteoporosis clinic for patient care and research. She later broadened her research interests beyond musculoskeletal aging to study other aging-related topics such as the gut microbiome in older men and the effects of cancer treatments on aging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    Dr. Kado is a California native. She trained at UCSF and UCLA. She also earned a Master of Science degree in epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health, sponsored by the John Hartford Foundation.

    She is a member of the American Geriatrics Society, American Society of Bone and Mineral Research, Gerontological Society of America, The Endocrine Society, and other professional organizations. She co-chairs the NIH National Institute on Aging Workshop for the American Society of Bone and Mineral Research. She also participates in the Bone Health Working Group of the Society for Women’s Health Research.

  • Robin Kamal MD MBA

    Robin Kamal MD MBA

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWrist and Elbow Injuries and Quality Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery

  • Monroe Kennedy III

    Monroe Kennedy III

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focus is to develop technology that improves everyday life by anticipating and acting on the needs of human counterparts. My research can be divided into the following sub-categories: robotic assistants, connected devices and intelligent wearables. My Assistive Robotics and Manipulation lab focuses heavily on both the analytical and experimental components of assistive technology design.

  • Khizer Khaderi MD, MPH

    Khizer Khaderi MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Ophthalmology

    BioDr. Khizer Khaderi is Clinical Associate Professor at the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University. Khaderi is the Director/Founder of the Stanford Human Perception Laboratory (HPL) and the Stanford Vision Performance Center (VPC), and faculty at the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI.

    Khaderi is a renowned Neuro-Ophthalmic surgeon, technologist and futurist. He founded Vizzario Inc, a perceptual AI company, spun out from HPL. Khaderi has extensive domain expertise in artificial intelligence (AI), virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), mixed reality (MxR), wearables, applied neuroscience, human factors, and human-machine interfaces/interaction. His research interests include developing personalized human intelligent systems for the metaverse based on the human brain and sensory systems, developing technologies to optimize human performance, and combining biological and computational principles to expand our capabilities in research, clinical practice, and everyday life. Dr. Khaderi's approach to advance research interests and develop practical applications for everyday use is building collaborative partnerships across academia and industry.

    Dr. Khaderi’s experience across industry sectors include consumer electronics, gaming, retail, life science, sports/Esports health care, Pharma, e-commerce, to name a few. He has developed novel technologies in these areas, and generated multiple invention patents. Selected as a “40 under 40”, he contributed to President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology regarding vision technology and the aging population. He also advises multiple companies, venture firms and organizations including the Global Esports Federation, Magic Leap, Riot Games, Intel, Activision, Unity, Epic Games, Google, FB, Microsoft, Apple, NBA, Aerie Pharma, the World Health Organization, and the World Bank.

  • Oussama Khatib

    Oussama Khatib

    Weichai Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioRobotics research on novel control architectures, algorithms, sensing, and human-friendly designs for advanced capabilities in complex environments. With a focus on enabling robots to interact cooperatively and safely with humans and the physical world, these studies bring understanding of human movements for therapy, athletic training, and performance enhancement. Our work on understanding human cognitive task representation and physical skills is enabling transfer for increased robot autonomy. With these core capabilities, we are exploring applications in healthcare and wellness, industry and service, farms and smart cities, and dangerous and unreachable settings -- deep in oceans, mines, and space.

  • Abby C. King

    Abby C. King

    Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include applications of behavioral theory and social ecological approaches to achieve large scale changes impacting chronic disease prevention and control; expanding the reach and translation of evidence-based interventions through state-of-the-art technologies; exploring social and physical environmental influences on health; applying community participatory research perspectives to address health disparities; and policy-level approaches to health promotion/disease prevention.

  • Joshua W. Knowles

    Joshua W. Knowles

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenetic basis of coronary disease
    Genetic basis of insulin resistance
    Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH)

  • Brian Knutson

    Brian Knutson

    Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab and I seek to elucidate the neural basis of emotion (affective neuroscience), and explore implications for decision-making (neuroeconomics) and psychopathology (neurophenomics).

  • Mykel Kochenderfer

    Mykel Kochenderfer

    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioMykel Kochenderfer is Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. Prior to joining the faculty, he was at MIT Lincoln Laboratory where he worked on airspace modeling and aircraft collision avoidance, with his early work leading to the establishment of the ACAS X program. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh and B.S. and M.S. degrees in computer science from Stanford University. Prof. Kochenderfer is the director of the Stanford Intelligent Systems Laboratory (SISL), conducting research on advanced algorithms and analytical methods for the design of robust decision making systems. Of particular interest are systems for air traffic control, unmanned aircraft, and other aerospace applications where decisions must be made in uncertain, dynamic environments while maintaining safety and efficiency. Research at SISL focuses on efficient computational methods for deriving optimal decision strategies from high-dimensional, probabilistic problem representations. He is the author of "Decision Making under Uncertainty: Theory and Application" and "Algorithms for Optimization", both from MIT Press. He is a third generation pilot.

  • Feliks Kogan

    Feliks Kogan

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Musculoskeletal Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on the development and clinical translation of novel imaging techniques geared toward early detection of musculoskeletal disease. Current projects include whole-joint molecular imaging of early disease with PET-MRI, imaging of early cartilage changes in Osteoarthritis (OA) with GagCEST, rapid knee imaging and simultaneous bilateral knee MRI.

  • Julie Kolesar

    Julie Kolesar

    Research Engineer

    BioJulie Kolesar is a Research Engineer in the Human Performance Lab, supporting teaching and interdisciplinary research at the crossroads of engineering, sports medicine, and athletics. Her work aims to understand the underlying mechanisms relating biomechanical changes with function and quality of life for individuals with musculoskeletal disorders and injuries. As part of the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance, Dr. Kolesar engages in collaborations which seek to optimize human health and performance across the lifespan. Her expertise and research interests include experimental gait analysis, musculoskeletal modeling and simulation, and clinical interventions and rehabilitation.

  • Emily Kraus

    Emily Kraus

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Emily Kraus is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford Children’s Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center. She specializes in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) sports medicine and takes a unique approach to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of sports injuries in athletes of all ages. She is involved in multiple Stanford IRB-approved research projects, including The Healthy Runner Project, a multicenter prospective interventional study focused on bone stress injury prevention in collegiate middle and long distance runners.

    Dr. Kraus also spends time performing gait analysis at the Stanford Run Safe Injury Prevention Program and serves as a medical advisors for the Adaptive Sports Injury Prevention Program at the Palo Alto VA. She has research and clinical interests in endurance sports medicine, injury prevention, running biomechanics, the prevention of bone stress injuries in collegiate athletes and the promotion of health and wellness at any age of life.

    She has completed seven marathons including Boston Marathon twice and one 50k ultramarathon. With running and staying physically active as one of her personal passions, she recognizes the importance of fitness for overall wellbeing and the prevention of chronic medical conditions.

  • Joy Ku

    Joy Ku

    Research Technical Manager, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance

    Current Role at StanfordJoy Ku is focused on biocomputation and the advancement of their use through teaching, science communications, community building, and the promotion of research resource sharing efforts, particularly as related to reproducibility and open-source science.

    She is currently Deputy Director of the Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance at Stanford (https://humanperformance.stanford.edu) and also leads the education and outreach efforts for the overall Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance, which consists of institutions across the country, including Boston Children's Hospital, Salk, UC San Diego, the University of Kansas, and the University of Oregon. The Alliance's mission is to discover biological principles to optimize human performance and catalyze innovations in human health.

    Dr. Ku is also the Director of Promotions and Didactic Interactions for the NIH-funded Restore Center (https://restore.stanford.edu), as well as the Director of Education and Communications for the Mobilize Center (https://mobilize.stanford.edu), an NIH Biomedical Technology Resource Center. Both Centers provide tools, infrastructure, and training to support the research community. The Mobilize Center's emphasis is on biomechanical modeling and machine learning algorithms to provide new insights into human movement from data sources, such as wearables, video, and medical images. The Restore Center's mission is to advance rehabilitation research using mobile sensor and video technology for real-world assessments of movement and factors affecting movement.

    She also manages SimTK (https://simtk.org), a software, model, and data-sharing platform for the biocomputation research community.

  • Ellen Kuhl

    Ellen Kuhl

    Walter B Reinhold Professor in the School of Engineering, Robert Bosch Chair of Mechanical Engineering, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestscomputaitonal simulation of brain development, cortical folding, computational simulation of cardiac disease, heart failure, left ventricular remodeling, electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, computer-guided surgical planning, patient-specific simulation

  • Anshul Kundaje

    Anshul Kundaje

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop statistical and machine learning frameworks to learn predictive, dynamic and causal models of gene regulation from heterogeneous functional genomics data.

  • Andrea Lynn Kussman

    Andrea Lynn Kussman

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kussman conducts research on injury prevention and athlete wellness. Specific areas of interest include the female athlete, endurance athletes, bone health, mental health in athletes, exercise as medicine, and medical education. Previous research has included work on the female and male athlete triad, eating disorders in athletes, mental health in athletes, mononucleosis infection in athletes, cardiac complications of COVID-19, and concussion.

  • James Landay

    James Landay

    Anand Rajaraman and Venky Harinarayan Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLanday's current research interests include Technology to Support Behavior Change (especially for health and sustainability), Demonstrational User Interfaces, Mobile & Ubiquitous Computing, Cross-Cultural Interface Design, Human-Centered AI, and User Interface Design Tools. He has developed tools, techniques, and a top professional book on Web Interface Design.

  • Marc Levenston

    Marc Levenston

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab's research involves the function, degeneration and repair of musculoskeletal soft tissues, with a focus on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage. We are particularly interested in the complex interactions between biophysical and biochemical cues in controlling cell behavior, the roles of these interactions in degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis, and development of tissue engineered 3D model systems for studying physical influences on primary and progenitor cells.

  • Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Y. Joyce Liao, MD, PhD

    Professor of Ophthalmology and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIschemic optic neuropathy
    Stem cell transplantation
    Optic neuropathy
    Optic neuritis
    Eye movement disorders
    Reading
    Parkinson's disease
    Multiple sclerosis