Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance


Showing 101-163 of 163 Results

  • Stephen B. Montgomery

    Stephen B. Montgomery

    Associate Professor of Pathology, of Genetics, of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe focus on understanding the effects of genome variation on cellular phenotypes and cellular modeling of disease through genomic approaches such as next generation RNA sequencing in combination with developing and utilizing state-of-the-art bioinformatics and statistical genetics approaches. See our website at http://montgomerylab.stanford.edu/

  • Jonathan N. Myers

    Jonathan N. Myers

    Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Medicine - Med/Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Myers is a Health Research Scientist at the Palo Alto VA Health Care System; a Clinical Professor at Stanford University (Affiliated), and a Senior Research Career Scientist Award recipient through the VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Program. His research has focused on primary and secondary prevention, and the clinical applications of exercise testing and rehabilitation in patients with cardiovascular disease and other chronic conditions. He has a lengthy history of studying the epidemiology of cardiopulmonary exercise test responses, physical activity patterns, and other lifestyle factors and their relation to health outcomes. He manages the Veterans Exercise Testing Study (VETS), an ongoing, prospective evaluation of Veteran subjects referred for exercise testing for clinical reasons, designed to address exercise test, clinical, and lifestyle factors and their association with health outcomes.

    He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara, his master's degree from San Diego State University, and his doctorate from the University of Southern California. He has been a board member for many organizations including the American Heart Association (AHA), the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and serves on the editorial board for 9 journals. He is a recipient of the Michael Pollock Established Investigator Award through the AACVPR, a recipient of the Steven N Blair Award for excellence in physical activity research from the AHA Council on Epidemiology and Prevention and is the 2022 recipient of the American College of Sports Medicine Citation Award. He is a fellow of the AACVPR, ACSM, American College of Cardiology, and the AHA, and has authored and co-authored guidelines on exercise testing and rehabilitation for each of these organizations, including the 2021 editions of the ACSM and AACVPR guidelines.

  • Douglas Noordsy

    Douglas Noordsy

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDouglas L. Noordsy, MD, is Clinical Professor and Director of Lifestyle Psychiatry, and psychiatrist on the INSPIRE Early Psychosis Clinic in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Noordsy was previously Professor of Psychiatry, Director of Psychosis Services and Investigator in the Psychopharmacology Research Group at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. His research interests include medication and lifestyle interventions for individuals with psychotic disorders; methods to facilitate recovery and promote achievement of optimal outcomes for people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; and methods to prevent progression of early psychotic disorders. He is particularly interested in the role of physical exercise for prevention of progression of early psychosis and for potentiating learning in CBTp and supported employment and education. Dr. Noordsy is a member of the Schizophrenia International Research Society, the International Early Psychosis Association, and is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. He is a member of the editorial boards for Community Mental Health Journal, Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychosis, and Schizophrenia Bulletin. Dr. Noordsy was recognized with the Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness in 2001, and the Excellence in Leadership Award from the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford in 2018.

    http://med.stanford.edu/psychiatry/patient_care/inspire.html

    http://med.stanford.edu/psychiatry/patient_care/sports.html

  • Anthony Norcia

    Anthony Norcia

    Professor (Research) of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsVision, development, functional imaging, systems analysis

  • Paul Nuyujukian

    Paul Nuyujukian

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur group explores neuroengineering and its application to both basic and clinical neuroscience. Our goal is to develop brain-machine interfaces as a platform technology for a variety of brain-related medical conditions including stroke and epilepsy.

  • Allison Okamura

    Allison Okamura

    Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on developing the principles and tools needed to realize advanced robotic and human-machine systems capable of physical interaction. Application areas include surgery, simulation and training, rehabilitation, prosthetics, neuromechanics, exploration of hazardous and remote environments (e.g. space), design, and education.

  • Sergiu P. Pasca

    Sergiu P. Pasca

    Bonnie Uytengsu and Family Director of Stanford Brain Organogenesis and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA critical challenge in understanding the intricate programs underlying development, assembly and dysfunction of the human brain is the lack of direct access to intact, functioning human brain tissue for detailed investigation by imaging, recording, and stimulation.
    To address this, we are developing bottom-up approaches to generate and assemble, from multi-cellular components, human neural circuits in vitro and in vivo.
    We introduced the use of instructive signals for deriving from human pluripotent stem cells self-organizing 3D cellular structures named brain region-specific spheroids/organoids. We demonstrated that these cultures, such as the ones resembling the cerebral cortex, can be reliably derived across many lines and experiments, contain synaptically connected neurons and non-reactive astrocytes, and can be used to gain mechanistic insights into genetic and environmental brain disorders. Moreover, when maintained as long-term cultures, they recapitulate an intrinsic program of maturation that progresses towards postnatal stages.
    We also pioneered a modular system to integrate 3D brain region-specific organoids and study human neuronal migration and neural circuit formation in functional preparations that we named assembloids. We have actively applied these models in combination with studies in long-term ex vivo brain preparations to acquire a deeper understanding of human physiology, evolution and disease mechanisms.
    We have carved a unique research program that combines rigorous in vivo and in vitro neuroscience, stem cell and molecular biology approaches to construct and deconstruct previously inaccessible stages of human brain development and function in health and disease.
    We believe science is a community effort, and accordingly, we have been advancing the field by broadly and openly sharing our technologies with numerous laboratories around the world and organizing the primary research conference and the training courses in the area of cellular models of the human brain.

  • Russell Poldrack

    Russell Poldrack

    Albert Ray Lang Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab uses the tools of cognitive neuroscience to understand how decision making, executive control, and learning and memory are implemented in the human brain. We also develop neuroinformatics tools and resources to help researchers make better sense of data.

  • Lisa Post

    Lisa Post

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Lisa Post, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of anxiety, depression and adjustment disorders in adults. She has been a practicing clinician at Stanford Hospital and Clinics since 1993. Since 2000, she has been Director of a clinical program for Stanford Varsity Athletes and for nine years has been the Team Clinician for the San Francisco 49ers. Her primary interest are in the treatment of high performing individuals and in stress management.

  • Carla Pugh, MD, PhD

    Carla Pugh, MD, PhD

    Thomas Krummel Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Technology Enabled Clinical Improvement (T.E.C.I.) Center is a multidisciplinary team of researchers dedicated to the design and implementation of advanced engineering technologies that facilitate data acquisition relating to clinical performance.

  • Stephen Quake

    Stephen Quake

    Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle molecule biophysics, precision force measurement, micro and nano fabrication with soft materials, integrated microfluidics and large scale biological automation.

  • Allan L. Reiss

    Allan L. Reiss

    Howard C. Robbins Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory, the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research (CIBSR), focuses on multi-level scientific study of individuals with typical and atypical brain structure and function. Data are obtained from genetic analyses, structural and functional neuroimaging studies, assessment of endocrinological status, neurobehavioral assessment, and analysis of pertinent environmental factors. Our overarching focus is to model how brain disorders arise and to develop disease-specific treatments.

  • Laura Roberts, MD, MA

    Laura Roberts, MD, MA

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Roberts has performed numerous empirical studies of contemporary ethics issues in medicine and health policy and has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, the National Alliance of Schizophrenia and Depression, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, and other private and public foundations.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:
    1. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.
    2. To investigate the role of innate immune inflammation in osteoarthritis.
    3. To develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics

  • Eugene Y. Roh, MD

    Eugene Y. Roh, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTherapeutic Efficacy of biologic treatments(Platelet Rich Plasma, mesenchymal stem cell) in various musculoskeletal conditions.
    Application of musculoskeletal ultrasound for sports medicine and other musculoskeletal disease.
    Outcome study of golfers with back injury or upper extremity injury and biomechanical analysis

  • Elsie Gyang Ross

    Elsie Gyang Ross

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and of Medicine (BMIR)

    BioDr. Ross is a vascular surgeon and research scientist. She graduated from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2011 and completed her vascular surgery 0+5 residency at Stanford University School of Medicine in 2018. During her residency, she completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in biomedical informatics. Her current research focuses on using machine learning and electronic health records for early disease identification, precision medicine, and evaluating opportunities to engage in patient education beyond the clinic.

  • Marc R. Safran, MD

    Marc R. Safran, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Safran’s practice focuses on arthroscopic management of hip problems as well as articular cartilage regeneration, shoulder surgery and athletic shoulder and elbow problems. He is actively involved in research in these areas.

  • Shima Salehi

    Shima Salehi

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Education

    BioShima Salehi is a Research Assistant Professor at Stanford Graduate School of Education, and the director of IDEAL research lab, the research component of Stanford IDEAL initiative to promote inclusivity, diversity, equity and access in learning communities. Her research focuses on how to use different instructional practices to teach science and engineering more effectively and inclusively. For effective science and engineering education, Dr. Salehi has studied effective scientific problem-solving and developed empirical framework for main problem-solving practices to train students in. Based on these findings, she has designed instructional activities to provide students with explicit opportunities to learn these problem-solving practices. These activities have been implemented in different science and engineering courses. For Inclusive science and engineering, she examines different barriers for equity in STEM education and through what instructional and/or institutional changes they can be addressed. Her recent works focus on what are the underlying mechanisms for demographic performance gaps in STEM college education, and what instructional practices better serve students from different demographic backgrounds. Salehi holds a PhD in Learning Sciences and a PhD minor in Psychology from Stanford University, and received a B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Iran. She is the founder of KhanAcademyFarsi, a non-profit educational organization which has provided service to Farsi-speaking students, particularly in under-privileged areas.

  • Jacinda Sampson

    Jacinda Sampson

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Jacinda Sampson received her MD and a PhD in biochemistry from University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed her neurology residency and neurogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. She served at Columbia University Medical Center prior to joining Stanford University Medical Center in 2015. Her areas of interest include myotonic dystrophies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and neurogenetic disorders such as neurofibromatosis, hereditary spastic paraparesis, spinocerebellar ataxia, among others. She is interested in clinical trials for treatment of neurogenetic disorders, and is the clinical application of next-generation genomic sequencing to genetic testing.

  • Juan G. Santiago

    Juan G. Santiago

    Charles Lee Powell Foundation Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestshttp://microfluidics.stanford.edu/Projects/Projects.html

  • Daniel Schwartz

    Daniel Schwartz

    Dean of the Graduate School of Education and the Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Educational Technology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInstructional methods, transfer of learning and assessment, mathematical development, teachable agents, cognition, and cognitive neuroscience.

  • Eric S.G. Shaqfeh

    Eric S.G. Shaqfeh

    Lester Levi Carter Professor and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have over 25 years experience in theoretical and computational research related to complex fluids following my PhD in 1986. This includes work in suspension mechanics of rigid partlcles (rods), solution mechanics of polymers and most recently suspensions of vesicles, capsules and mixtures of these with rigid particles. My research group is internationally known for pioneering work in all these areas.

  • Carla Shatz

    Carla Shatz

    Sapp Family Provostial Professor, The Catherine Holman Johnson Director of Stanford Bio-X and Professor of Biology and of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of research in the Shatz Laboratory is to discover how brain circuits are tuned up by experience during critical periods of development both before and after birth by elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms that transform early fetal and neonatal brain circuits into mature connections. To discover mechanistic underpinnings of circuit tuning, the lab has conducted functional screens for genes regulated by neural activity and studied their function for vision, learning and memory.

  • Kevin Shea

    Kevin Shea

    Chambers-Okamura Endowed Professor of Pediatric Orthopaedics

    BioKevin G. Shea, MD is an orthopaedic surgeon at Stanford University Medical Center and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. Dr. Shea grew up in Montana and California, graduated from the UCLA School of Medicine, and completed his orthopaedic residency at the University of Utah School of Medicine. His advanced training includes pediatric orthopaedics at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego, AO Fellowship in Bern Switzerland with Drs. Ganz (Hip), Dr. Diego Fernandez (Trauma), and Dr. Hans Staubli (sports), and Ilizarov Training in Lecco, Italy. He was the AOSSM Traveling Sports Medicine Fellow in 2008, and practiced in Boise, ID prior to joining the Stanford Faculty. Dr. Shea is a founding member of the PRiSM Society (Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine), the ROCK (Research in OsteoChondritis of the Knee) Multi-center Study Group, and the SCORE prospective cohort registry for pediatric sports arthroscopy outcomes, complications. He is a member of the AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons), POSNA (Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America) and the AOSSM (American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine). In addition, Dr. Shea has authored more than 240 scientific papers and book chapters.

  • Krishna Shenoy

    Krishna Shenoy

    Hong Seh and Vivian W. M. Lim Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology, of Bioengineering and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe conduct neuroscience, neuroengineering and translational research to better understand how the brain controls movement, and to design medical systems to assist people with paralysis. These are referred to as brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and intra-cortical neural prostheses. We conduct this research as part of our Neural Prosthetic Systems Lab (NPSL) and our Neural Prosthetics Translational Lab (NPTL), which I co-direct with Prof. Jaimie Henderson, M.D.

  • Seth Lawrence Sherman, MD

    Seth Lawrence Sherman, MD

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on ways to augment tissue healing, improve human performance, and prevent musculoskeletal injuries. Approaching these challenges through parallel basic science and clinical pathways, our team works from the “bedside to the bench and back to the bedside”, identifying areas of clinical need to deliver evidence-based solutions for patients.

    We collaborates with orthopaedic surgeons, non-surgical physicians, and researchers within bioengineering, human performance, and musculoskeletal imaging across the Stanford campus. The team is developing novel methods to accurately record human movement (including wearable technology, phone-based systems), rapid MRI imaging protocols, and exploring the use of biomarkers to track injury and recovery. This research builds on my earlier work, which utilized portable, inexpensive software for Microsoft Kinect to detect knee injury risk in youth athletes performing a drop vertical jump test. The team’s multifaceted goal is: 1) develop innovative methods to screen for injury risk (i.e. youth athlete non-contact ACL), 2) create targeted intervention programs to reduce risk, 3) enhance athletic performance; and 4) improve accuracy of return to play testing following injury/surgery (i.e. clinical evaluation, biomarkers, functional tests, imaging analysis for healing).

    In the laboratory,our team investigates cellular and molecular deficiencies in tissue types including tendon, ligament, articular cartilage, and meniscus. By understanding aberrant pathways leading to tissue injury, they can identify innovative therapeutic targets for intervention. In collaboration with the Genetic Engineering and Synthetic Biology laboratories, Dr. Sherman’s research has explored the role of orthobiologic agents such as platelet rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) for tissue healing in patella tendinopathy (the breakdown of collagen in a tendon). Our lab is also investigating the use of CBD for musculoskeletal applications as an alternative to commonly used local anesthetics and cortisone derivatives. In my earlier work, we researched the cellular toxicity of such applications.

    In addition to basic science research, I have helped to build a Sports Medicine clinical research team that includes several full-time clinical research coordinators, residents, fellows, and students. The team collects prospective outcomes on their patients using a novel data collection platform called Patient IQ. The group is part of the JUPITER study which is the largest, multicenter study ever assembled in patellofemoral instability. They are additionally planning to enroll in FDA-approved clinical studies investigating pioneering strategies for knee cartilage restoration, joint preservation, and orthobiologic injections for osteoarthritis. Recent clinical publications explore outcomes in meniscus preservation and transplantation, medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, osteochondral allograft and matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI), and surgical augmentation using PRP/BMAC. The clinical research team actively reports results of non-surgical and surgical interventions to continue to introduce new knowledge to the field, with the goal of improved patient outcome.

  • Matthew Smuck, MD

    Matthew Smuck, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI direct the Wearable Health Lab at Stanford, investigating medical applications of mobile technology to improve musculoskeletal and neurologic disease detection, treatment and prevention.

  • Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Michael Snyder, Ph.D.

    Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory use different omics approaches to study a) regulatory networks, b) intra- and inter-species variation which differs primarily at the level of regulatory information c) human health and disease. For the later we have established integrated Personal Omics Profiling (iPOP), an analysis that combines longitudinal analyses of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, DNA methylation, microbiome and autoantibody profiles to monitor healthy and disease states

  • Hyongsok Tom  Soh

    Hyongsok Tom Soh

    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    BioDr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.

  • Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Justin L. Sonnenburg

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goals of the Sonnenburg Lab research program are to (i) elucidate the basic mechanisms that underlie dynamics within the gut microbiota and (ii) devise and implement strategies to prevent and treat disease in humans via the gut microbiota. We investigate the principles that govern gut microbial community function and interaction with the host using a broad range of experimental approaches including studies of microbiomes in diverse human cohorts.

  • David Spiegel

    David Spiegel

    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Spiegel's research program involves mind/body interactions, including cancer progression, the response to traumatic stress, and the effect of hypnosis on the perception of pain and anxiety.

  • Claude Steele

    Claude Steele

    Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences, Emeritus

    BioClaude M. Steele is an American social psychologist and a Professor of Psychology at Stanford University.

    He is best known for his work on stereotype threat and its application to minority student academic performance. His earlier work dealt with research on the self (e.g., self-image, self- affirmation) as well as the role of self-regulation in addictive behaviors. In 2010, he released his book, Whistling Vivaldi and Other Clues to How Stereotypes Affect Us, summarizing years of research on stereotype threat and the underperformance of minority students in higher education.

    He holds B.A. in Psychology from Hiram College, an M.A. in Social Psychology from Ohio State University, and a Ph.D. in Social Psychology and Statistical Psychology from Ohio State University.

    He is elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Science Board, the
    National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society.

    He currently serves as a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and as a Fellow for both the American Institutes for Research and the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

    He has served in several major academic leadership positions as the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost at UC Berkeley, the I. James Quillen Dean for the School of Education at Stanford University, and as the 21st Provost of Columbia University. Past roles also include serving as the President of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, as the President of the Western Psychological Association, and as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Psychological Society.

    Professor Steele holds Honorary Doctorates from Yale University, Northwestern University, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, DePaul University and
    Claremont Graduate University.

  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Marcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D.

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), of Obstetrics and Gynecology and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMarcia L. Stefanick, Ph.D is a Professor of Medicine Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and by courtesy, Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stefanick’s research focuses on chronic disease prevention (particularly, heart disease, breast cancer, osteoporosis, and dementia) in both women and men. She is currently the Principal Investigator the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Extension Study, having been the PI of the Stanford Clinical Center of the landmark WHI Clinical Trials and Observational Study since 1994 and Chair of the WHI Steering and Executive Committees from 1998-2011, as well as PI of the WHI Strong and Healthy (WHISH) Trial which is testing the hypothesis that a DHHS-based physical activity intervention, being delivered to a multi-ethnic cohort of about 24,000 WHI participants across the U.S., aged 68-99 when the trial started in 2015, will reduce major cardiovascular events over 8 years, compared to an equal number of “usual activity” controls. Dr. Stefanick is also PI of the Osteoporotic Study of Men (MrOS) which is continuing to conduct clinical assessments of bone and body composition in survivors of an original cohort of nearly 6000 men aged 65 and over in 2001. As founding Director of the Stanford Women’s Health and Sex Differences in Medicine (WHSDM, “wisdom”) Center, she plays a major role in promoting research and teaching on Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease, Women’s Health and Queer Health and Medicine. Dr. Stefanick also plays major leadership roles at the Stanford School of Medicine, including as co-leader of the Population Sciences Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford’s NCI-funded comprehensive cancer center.

    Dr. Stefanick obtained her B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (1974), then pursued her interest in hormone and sex difference research at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, after which she obtained her PhD in Physiology at Stanford University, focusing on reproductive physiology and neuroendocrinology, with exercise physiology as a secondary focus. Her commitment to human research led to a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, which has been her academic home for nearly 40 years.

  • Julie Half Sutcliffe

    Julie Half Sutcliffe

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Julie Sutcliffe is a licensed psychologist specializing in athlete mental health and sport and performance psychology. She began at Stanford in 2018. In her role of Assistant Director of Sport Psychology for Stanford Athletics, she provides individual and team services to Stanford Varsity student-athletes, consultation, education, and outreach programming to Stanford Athletics and specialized care referrals.

  • Katrin J Svensson

    Katrin J Svensson

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular metabolism
    Protein biochemistry
    Cell biology and function
    Animal physiology

  • Sindy Tang

    Sindy Tang

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology (Precision Health and Integrated Diagnostics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of Dr. Tang's research program is to harness mass transport in microfluidic systems to accelerate precision medicine and material design for a future with better health and environmental sustainability.

    Current research areas include: (I) Physics of droplets in microfluidic systems, (II) Interfacial mass transport and self-assembly, and (III) Applications in food allergy, single-cell wound repair, and the bottom-up construction of synthetic cell and tissues in close collaboration with clinicians and biochemists at the Stanford School of Medicine, UCSF, and University of Michigan.

    For details see https://web.stanford.edu/group/tanglab/

  • Daniel Tartakovsky

    Daniel Tartakovsky

    Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEnvironmental fluid mechanics, Applied and computational mathematics, Biomedical modeling.

  • Joseph D. Towles, PhD

    Joseph D. Towles, PhD

    Lecturer

    BioJoseph Towles is a Lecturer jointly appointed in the Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering Departments at Stanford University. Joe’s teaching interests are in the areas of solid mechanics, neuromuscular biomechanics, dynamical systems and control, and engineering design. His scholarship interests are in the areas of neuromuscular biomechanics and educational practices in engineering.

    A Mechanical Engineer by training, Joe earned his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and his MS and PhD degrees both in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University (1996-2003). Following graduate school, Joe was a research post-doctoral fellow and subsequently a research scientist and then a research assistant professor in neuromuscular biomechanics in the Sensory Motor Performance Program at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at Northwestern University (2003-2012). Additionally, Joe was a research health scientist for the Rehabilitation R&D Service in the Department of Veterans Affairs (Hines, IL) during that time and later a scientist in the neuromuscular biomechanics lab in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2012-2014). At the time, Joe led projects that addressed the broad question of how to restore hand function (ability to grasp objects) following cervical spinal cord injury and hemiparetic stroke using experimental and computational techniques in biomechanics. As a complement to intensively teaching within the undergraduate and graduate curricula in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2014-2018), and now teaching intensively and broadly within the undergraduate curricula of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering at Stanford, Joe's scholarship interests include both biomechanics and educational practices in engineering. Recent educational projects have investigated factors that influence K-12 students' engagement/interest in bioengineering, integration of CATME into an undergraduate mechanical engineering design course that enhances student experience and performance, analytical tool for improving intra- and inter-team communication in an engineering design course, and factors important for teaching undergraduate students how to identify healthcare needs worth pursuing in the context of health technology innovation efforts.

  • Scott Uhlrich

    Scott Uhlrich

    Research Engineer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental biomechanical analysis of healthy and pathological human movement. Real-time biofeedback to modify motor control and kinematics.

    Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation for estimating unmeasurable quantities during movement, like joint forces in individuals with osteoarthritis. Predictive musculoskeletal simulations to design rehabilitation interventions.

    Computer vision, wearable sensing, and machine learning to develop tools that democratize biomechanical analysis and translate biomechanical interventions into clinical practice.

    Quantitative MRI for analyzing the effect of non-surgical treatments for osteoarthritis on cartilage health. PET-MRI for analyzing relationships between the mechanical loading of tissue metabolic activity.

  • Hannes Vogel MD

    Hannes Vogel MD

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics (Pediatric Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include nerve and muscle pathology, mitochondrial diseases, pediatric neurooncology, and transgenic mouse pathology.

  • Anthony Wagner

    Anthony Wagner

    Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCognitive neuroscience of memory and cognitive/executive control in young and older adults. Research interests include encoding and retrieval mechanisms; interactions between declarative, nondeclarative, and working memory; forms of cognitive control; neurocognitive aging; functional organization of prefrontal cortex, parietal cortex, and the medial temporal lobe; assessed by functional MRI, scalp and intracranial EEG, and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

  • Rebecca D. Walker

    Rebecca D. Walker

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterests include international development in emergency care, healthcare disparities, wilderness medicine, human rights, administration

  • Greg Walton

    Greg Walton

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines the nature of self and identity, often in the context of academic motivation and achievement. I'm interested in social factors relevant to motivation, in stereotypes and group differences in school achievement, and in social-psychological interventions to raise achievement and narrow group differences.

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModels and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes. Image systems simulations of optics and sensors and image processing. Data and computation management for reproducible research.

  • Adam Wang

    Adam Wang

    Assistant Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioMy group develops technologies for advanced x-ray and CT imaging, including artificial intelligence for CT acquisition, reconstruction, and image processing; novel system and detector designs; spectral imaging; model-based image reconstruction; and radiation transport methods. I am also the Director of the Zeego Lab and the Tabletop X-Ray Lab.

    I completed my PhD in Electrical Engineering at Stanford under the supervision of Dr. Norbert Pelc, developing strategies for maximizing the information content of dual energy CT and photon counting detectors. I then pursued a postdoc at Johns Hopkins with Dr. Jeff Siewerdsen in Biomedical Engineering, developing reconstruction and registration methods for x-ray based image-guided surgery. Prior to returning to Stanford in 2018, I was a Senior Scientist at Varian Medical Systems, developing x-ray/CT methods for image-guided radiation therapy.

  • Gordon Wetzstein

    Gordon Wetzstein

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGordon Wetzstein is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science at Stanford University. He is the leader of the Stanford Computational Imaging Lab and a faculty co-director of the Stanford Center for Image Systems Engineering. At the intersection of computer graphics and vision, computational optics, and applied vision science, Prof. Wetzstein's research has a wide range of applications in next-generation imaging, display, wearable computing, and microscopy systems. Prior to joining Stanford in 2014, Prof. Wetzstein was a Research Scientist at MIT, he received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of British Columbia in 2011 and graduated with Honors from the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany before that. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, an ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), an SPIE Early Career Achievement Award, a Terman Fellowship, an Okawa Research Grant, the Electronic Imaging Scientist of the Year 2017 Award, an Alain Fournier Ph.D. Dissertation Award, and a Laval Virtual Award as well as Best Paper and Demo Awards at ICCP 2011, 2014, and 2016 and at ICIP 2016.

  • Matthew Wheeler

    Matthew Wheeler

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Carl Wieman

    Carl Wieman

    Cheriton Family Professor and Professor of Physics and of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Wieman group’s research generally focuses on the nature of expertise in science and engineering, particularly physics, and how that expertise is best learned, measured, and taught. This involves a range of approaches, including individual cognitive interviews, laboratory experiments, and classroom interventions with controls for comparisons. We are also looking at how different classroom practices impact the attitudes and learning of different demographic groups.

  • Leanne Williams

    Leanne Williams

    Vincent V.C. Woo Professor, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator) and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA revolution is under way in psychiatry. We can now understand mental illness as an expression of underlying brain circuit disruptions, shaped by experience and genetics. Our lab is defining precision brain circuit types for depression, anxiety and attention deficit. We apply computational models to large amounts of brain imaging, behavior and other data. These precision brain types inform our translational intervention studies. To close the loop, field ready insights are applied in practice.

  • Jiajun Wu

    Jiajun Wu

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioJiajun Wu is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, working on computer vision, machine learning, and computational cognitive science. Before joining Stanford, he was a Visiting Faculty Researcher at Google Research. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Wu's research has been recognized through the ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award Honorable Mention, the AAAI/ACM SIGAI Doctoral Dissertation Award, the MIT George M. Sprowls PhD Thesis Award in Artificial Intelligence and Decision-Making, the 2020 Samsung AI Researcher of the Year, the IROS Best Paper Award on Cognitive Robotics, and faculty research awards and graduate fellowships from Samsung, Amazon, Meta, Nvidia, and Adobe.

  • Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD

    D. H. Chen Professor II

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUse of genetic and molecular tools to dissect immune and inflammatory pathways in Alzheimer's and neurodegeneration.

  • Phillip C. Yang, MD

    Phillip C. Yang, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Yang is a physician-scientist whose research interest focuses on clinical translation of the fundamental molecular and cellular processes of myocardial restoration. His research employs novel in vivo multi-modality molecular and cellular imaging technology to translate the basic innovation in cardiovascular pluripotent stem cell biologics. Dr. Yang is currently a PI on the NIH/NHLBI funded CCTRN UM1 grant, which is designed to conduct multi-center clinical trial on novel biological therapy.

  • Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsYang’ lab's research interests are in the areas of bio-inspired biomaterials, medical devices, and 3D printing approaches for re-creating a suitable microenvironment for cell growth and tissue regeneration for musculoskeletal disease diagnosis and treatment, including multiple tissue healing such as rotator cuff injury, orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, and orthopedic traumas such as massive bone and muscle injuries.

  • Jason Yeatman

    Jason Yeatman

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics), of Education and of Psychology

    BioDr. Jason Yeatman is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Yeatman completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford where he studied the neurobiology of literacy and developed new brain imaging methods for studying the relationship between brain plasticity and learning. After finishing his PhD, he took a faculty position at the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences before returning to Stanford.

    As the director of the Brain Development and Education Lab, the overarching goal of his research is to understand the mechanisms that underlie the process of learning to read, how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia, and to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences. His lab employs a collection of structural and functional neuroimaging measurements to study how a child’s experience with reading instruction shapes the development of brain circuits that are specialized for this unique cognitive function.

  • Serena Yeung

    Serena Yeung

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Serena Yeung is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research focus is on developing artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to enable new capabilities in biomedicine and healthcare. She has extensive expertise in deep learning and computer vision, and has developed computer vision algorithms for analyzing diverse types of visual data ranging from video capture of human behavior, to medical images and cell microscopy images.

    Dr. Yeung leads the Medical AI and Computer Vision Lab at Stanford. She is affiliated with the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Clinical Excellence Research Center, the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging, the Center for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Bio-X. She also serves on the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Artificial Intelligence.

  • Michael Zeineh

    Michael Zeineh

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention)

    BioDr. Michael Zeineh began his journey into clinical neuroscience when he received a B.S. with Honors in Biology at Caltech in 1995. He next went to UCLA's M.D.-Ph.D. program, where he studied in the laboratory of Dr. Susan Bookheimer. His Ph.D. thesis examined memory formation using advanced hippocampal subfield functional MRI in normals as well as in aging. After an internal medicine internship also at UCLA, he went on to further study medical imaging by entering radiology residency at Stanford. Finding his enduring passion with neuroimaging, he pursued neuroradiology fellowship also at Stanford, and became faculty as of 2010. He spearheads many initiatives in advanced clinical imaging at Stanford. Simultaneously, he runs a lab with the goal of discovering new imaging abnormalities in neurodegenerative disorders, with a focus on the hippocampal formation using in vivo and ex vivo methods.

  • Jamie Zeitzer

    Jamie Zeitzer

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Sleep Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Zeitzer is a circadian physiologist specializing in the understanding of the impact of light on circadian rhythms and other aspects of non-image forming light perception.
    He examines the manner in which humans respond to light and ways to manipulate this responsiveness, with direct application to jet lag, shift work, and altered sleep timing in teens. Dr. Zeitzer has also pioneered the use of actigraphy in the determination of epiphenomenal markers of psychiatric disorders.

  • Renee Zhao

    Renee Zhao

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioRuike Renee Zhao is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University where she directs the Soft Intelligent Materials Laboratory. Renee received her BS degree from Xi'an Jiaotong University in 2012, and her MS and PhD degrees from Brown University in 2014 and 2016, respectively. She was a postdoc associate at MIT during 2016-2018 prior to her appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at The Ohio State University from 2018 to 2021.
    Renee’s research concerns the development of stimuli-responsive soft composites for multifunctional robotic systems with integrated shape-changing, assembling, sensing, and navigation. By combining mechanics, polymer engineering, and advanced material manufacturing techniques, the functional soft composites enable applications in soft robotics, miniaturized biomedical devices, flexible electronics, deployable and morphing structures.
    Renee is a recipient of the 2022 ASME Henry Hess Early Career Publication Award, 2022 ASME Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal, 2021 ASME Applied Mechanics Division Journal of Applied Mechanics Award, 2020 NSF Career Award, and 2018 ASME Applied Mechanics Division Haythornthwaite Research Initiation Award.