School of Engineering


Showing 1-45 of 45 Results

  • Itai Ashlagi

    Itai Ashlagi

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioItai Ashlagi is an Associate Professor at the Management Science & Engineering Department.
    He is interested in game theory and the design and analysis of marketplaces. He is especially interested in marketplaces, in which matching is an essential activity. markets, for which he developed mechanisms using tools from operations/cs and economics. His work influenced the practice of Kidney exchange, for which he has become a Franz Edelman Laureate. Ashlagi received his PhD in operations research from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.
    Before coming to Stanford he was an assistant professor of Operations Management at Sloan, MIT and prior to that a postdoctoral researcher at HBS. He is the recipient of the outstanding paper award in the ACM conference of Electronic Commerce 2009. His research is supported by the NSF including an NSF-CAREER award.

  • Nicholas Bambos

    Nicholas Bambos

    Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2021 To 06/30/2022

    BioNick Bambos is R. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University, having a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Management Science & Engineering. He has been the Fortinet Founders Department Chair of the Management Science & Engineering Department (2016 – 20).

    He heads the Computer Systems Performance Engineering Lab (Perf-Lab) at Stanford, comprised of doctoral students and industry visitors engaged in various research projects, and was the Director (1999 – 2005) of the Stanford Networking Research Center (a research project of about $30M). He has published over 300 peer-reviewed research publications and graduated over 40 doctoral students (including two post-doctoral ones), who have moved on to leadership positions in academia, the Silicon Valley industries and technology startups, finance and venture capital, etc.

    His research interests are in architecture and high-performance engineering of computer systems and networks, as well as data analytics with an emphasis on medical and health-care analytics. His research contributions span the areas of networking and the Internet, cloud computing and data centers, multimedia streaming, computer security, digital health, etc. His methodological interests and contributions span the areas of network control, online task scheduling, routing and distributed processing, machine learning and artificial intelligence, etc.

    He received his Ph.D. (1989) in Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences from the University of California at Berkeley. Before joining Stanford in 1996, he served as assistant professor (1989 – 95) and tenured associate professor (1995 – 96) of Electrical Engineering at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA).

    He has received several best research paper awards and has been the Cisco Systems Faculty Development Chair and the David Morgenthaler Faculty Scholar at Stanford. He has won the IBM Faculty Award, as well as the National Young Investigator Award and the Research Initiation Award from the National Science Foundation. He has been a Berkeley U.C. Regents Fellow, an E. C. Anthony Fellow, and a D. & S. Gale Fellow.

    He has served on various editorial boards of research journals, scientific boards of research labs, international technical and scientific committees, and technical review panels for networking and computing technologies. He has also served on corporate technical boards, as consultant and co-founder of technology start-up companies, and as expert witness in high-profile patent litigation and other legal cases involving information technologies.

  • Stephen R. Barley

    Stephen R. Barley

    Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTechnology's role in occupational and organizational change. Science and innovation in industrial settings. Organizational and occupational culture. Corporate power. Social network theory. Macro-organizational behavior.

  • Jose Humberto Blanchet Mancilla

    Jose Humberto Blanchet Mancilla

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioJose Blanchet holds a Ph.D. in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University. Prior to joining MSandE he was a faculty member of Columbia and Harvard University. Jose is a recipient of the 2009 Best Publication Award given by the INFORMS Applied Probability Society and of the 2010 Erlang Prize. He also received a PECASE award given by NSF in 2010. He worked as an analyst in Protego Financial Advisors, a leading investment bank in Mexico. He has research interests in applied probability and Monte Carlo methods. He serves in the editorial board of Advances in Applied Probability, Journal of Applied Probability, Mathematics of Operations Research, QUESTA, Stochastic Models, and Stochastic Systems.

  • Margaret Brandeau

    Margaret Brandeau

    Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Policy (PCOR)
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2021 To 06/30/2022

    BioProfessor Brandeau is the Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and a Professor of Medicine (by Courtesy). Her research focuses on the development of applied mathematical and economic models to support health policy decisions. Her recent work has focused on HIV prevention and treatment programs, programs to control the US opioid epidemic, and policies for minimizing the spread of infectious diseases, including COVID-19. She has served as Principal Investigator or Co-PI on a broad range of funded research projects.

    She is a Fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) and a member of the Omega Rho International Honor Society for Operations Research and Management Science. From INFORMS she has received the President’s Award (recognizing important contributions to the welfare of society), the Pierskalla Prize (in 2001 and 2017, for research excellence in health care management science), the Philip McCord Morse Lectureship Award, and the Award for the Advancement of Women in Operations Research and the Management Sciences. She has also received the Award for Excellence in Application of Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes Research from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, among other awards. Professor Brandeau earned a BS in Mathematics and an MS in Operations Research from MIT, and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems from Stanford.

  • Thomas Byers

    Thomas Byers

    Entrepreneurship Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplied ethics, responsible innovation, and global entrepreneurship education (see http://peak.stanford.edu).

  • Richard Cottle

    Richard Cottle

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioRichard W. (Dick) Cottle was born in Chicago in 1934. He received his elementary and high school education in the neighboring village of Oak Park. Dick enrolled at Harvard College to take up political science and premedical studies in order to become a physician (or possibly a foreign service officer if that didn't work out). As it happened, both of these alternatives were abandoned because he was strongly attracted to mathematics and ultimately received his bachelor's degree in that field. He stayed on at Harvard and received the master's degree in mathematics in 1958. This was the Sputnik era, and Dick was moved by a passion to teach secondary-level mathematics. In the first of a series of fateful decisions, he joined the Mathematics Department at the Middlesex School in Concord, Massachusetts where for two years he taught grades 7-12. Midway through this period he married his wife Suzanne (Sue). At this time he began to think of returning to graduate school for a doctorate in mathematics. He decided to study geometry at the University of California at Berkeley and was admitted there. Just before leaving Middlesex, Dick received a telephone call from the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley offering him the part- time job as a computer programmer for which he had applied. Through this job, he became aware of linear and quadratic programming and the contributions of George Dantzig and Philip Wolfe. Before long, Dick left the Rad Lab to join Dantzig's team at the Operations Research Center at UC Berkeley. Under the tutelage of George Dantzig (and the late Edmund Eisenberg), Dick developed a symmetric duality theory and what was then called the "composite problem". These topics along with a reëxamination of the Fritz John conditions, formed the core of his doctoral dissertation. The composite problem involved a fusion of the primal and dual first-order optimality conditions. It was realized that the resulting inequality system could be studied without reference to the primal-dual structure out of which it was born. The name "complementarity problem" was suggested by Dick and introduced in a joint paper with Habetler and Lemke. After Berkeley, Dick's work took two closely related directions. One was the study of quadratic programming; the other was what we now call "linear complementarity". The interesting role played by classes of matrices in both these areas has always held a special fascination for Dick. In quadratic programming, for instance, with Jacques Ferland he obtained characterizations of quasi- and pseudo-convexity of quadratic functions. Dick (and others) were quick to recognize the importance of matrix classes in linear complementarity theory. It was he who proposed the name "copositive-plus" for a matrix class that arose in Lemke's seminal paper of 1965. The name first appeared in the classic paper of Cottle and Dantzig called "Complementary Pivot Theory of Mathematical Programming". The subjects of quadratic programming and linear complementarity (and the associated matrix theory) remain central to his research interests.

  • Charles (Chuck) Eesley

    Charles (Chuck) Eesley

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the influence of the external environment on entrepreneurship. I investigate the types of environments that encourage the founding of high growth, technology-based firms. I build on previous literature that explains why entrepreneurs are successful and my major contribution is to demonstrate that institutions matter. I show that effective institutional change influences who starts firms, not just how many firms are started.

  • Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Kathleen Eisenhardt

    Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D. Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical approaches: Cognition, complexity, learning, and organizational theories

    Methods: Multi-case Theory Building as well as machine learning, simulation, and econometrics

    Recent research: Business model design, strategy as "simple rules" heuristics, strategic interaction in novel markets and ecosystems, strategy in marketplaces, communities v. firm organizational forms

  • Kay Giesecke

    Kay Giesecke

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 10/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsKay is a financial technologist and engineer. He develops stochastic financial models, designs statistical methods for analyzing financial data, examines simulation and other numerical algorithms for solving the associated computational problems, and performs empirical analyses. Much of Kay's work is driven by important applications in areas such as credit risk management, investment management, and, most recently, housing finance.

  • Ashish Goel

    Ashish Goel

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioAshish Goel is a Professor of Management Science and Engineering and (by courtesy) Computer Science at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Computer Science from Stanford in 1999, and was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southern California from 1999 to 2002. His research interests lie in the design, analysis, and applications of algorithms.

  • Warren Hausman

    Warren Hausman

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Hausman performs research in operations planning and control, with specific interests in supply chain management. Most of his contributions are based upon quantitative modeling techniques and emphasize relevance and real world applicability.

    He has recently studied how RFID technology can revolutionize the management of supply chains. He has investigated the value of RFID applications in retail environments, in logistics, and in manufacturing and assembly operations. He has also studied how Supply Flexibility in retail supply chains affects a company's financial performance and market capitalization.

    He is an active consultant to industry and is involved in numerous executive education programs both at Stanford and around the world. He was the founding director of a two-day executive program on Integrated Supply Chain Management held semi-annually in Palo Alto, California from 1994 to 2003. His consulting clients represent the following industries: general manufacturing, electronics, computers, consumer products, food & beverage, transportation, healthcare, and high technology. He is also a co-founder of Supply Chain Online, which provides web-based corporate supply chain management training. He serves on the technical advisory boards of several Silicon Valley startups. He has also served as an Expert Witness for litigation involving operations management

    In 1994 he was elected President of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA). He has also served on the Board of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) and on several National Science Foundation Advisory Panels and Committees. He is a Fellow of INFORMS, a Distinguished Fellow of the Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Society, and a Fellow of the Production & Operations Management Society. He has also won several teaching awards, including the Eugene Grant Teaching Award in Stanford's School of Engineering in 1998.

    He earned a BA in Economics from Yale and a PhD from MIT's Sloan School of Management.

  • Pamela Hinds

    Pamela Hinds

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioPamela J. Hinds is Fortinet Founders Chair and Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Co-Director of the Center on Work, Technology, and Organization and on the Director's Council for the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design.. She studies the effect of technology on teams, collaboration, and innovation. Pamela has conducted extensive research on the dynamics of cross-boundary work teams, particularly those spanning national borders. She explores issues of culture, language, identity, conflict, and the role of site visits in promoting knowledge sharing and collaboration. She has published extensively on the relationship between national culture and work practices, particularly exploring how work practices or technologies created in one location are understood and employed at distant sites. Pamela also has a body of research on human-robot interaction in the work environment and the dynamics of human-robot teams. Most recently, Pamela has been looking at the changing nature of work in the face of emerging technologies, including the nature of coordination in open innovation, changes in work and organizing resulting from 3D-printing, and the work of data analysts. Her research has appeared in journals such as Organization Science, Research in Organizational Behavior, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Annals, Academy of Management Discoveries, Human-Computer Interaction, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. Pamela is a Senior Editor of Organization Science. She is also co-editor with Sara Kiesler of the book Distributed Work (MIT Press). Pamela holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Science and Management from Carnegie Mellon University.

  • Ronald Howard

    Ronald Howard

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioRonald A. Howard has been Professor in the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems (now the Department of Management Science and Engineering) in the School of Engineering of Stanford University since 1965. Professor Howard is one of the founders of the decision analysis discipline. His books on probabilistic modeling, decision analysis, dynamic programming, and Markov processes serve as major references for courses and research in these fields.

    Professor Howard directs teaching and research in the Decision Analysis Program of the Department of Management Science and Engineering. He also is the Director of the Decisions and Ethics Center, which examines the efficacy and ethics of social arrangements. Professor Howard defined the profession of decision analysis in 1964 and has since supervised several doctoral theses in decision analysis every year. His experience includes dozens of decision analysis projects that range over virtually all fields of application, from investment planning to research strategy, and from hurricane seeding to nuclear waste isolation. He has been a consultant to several companies and was a founding Director and Chairman of Strategic Decisions Group. He is President of the Decision Education Foundation, which he and colleagues founded to teach decision skills to young people.

    He has written four books, dozens of technical papers, and provided editorial service to seven technical journals. He was founding Editor of the Journal of the Society for Scientific Exploration. He has lectured in decision analysis at universities in several foreign countries, including the former Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China. His national society affiliations have included the Operations Research Society of America; the Operational Research Society (U. K.); the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (Fellow); the Institute of Management Science, which he served as President, and INFORMS, The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, (Fellow). Current research interests are improving the quality of decisions, life-and-death decision making, and the creation of a coercion-free society.

    In 1986 he received the Operations Research Society of America's Frank P. Ramsey Medal "for Distinguished Contributions in Decision Analysis. In 1998 he received from INFORMS the first award for the Teaching of Operations Research/Management Science Practice. In 1999, this organization invited him to give the Omega Rho Distinguished Plenary Lecture at the Cincinnati National Meeting. In the same year, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and received the Dean's Award for Academic Excellence.

    Professor Howard earned his Sc.D. in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1958. He was Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Associate Professor of Industrial Management, and Associate Director of the Operations Research Center at MIT when he joined the Stanford faculty as Professor in 1965.

  • Hillard Huntington

    Hillard Huntington

    Executive Director, Energy Modeling Forum
    Affiliate, Management Science and Engineering - Energy Modeling Forum

    BioHuntington is Executive Director of Stanford University's Energy Modeling Forum, where he conducts studies to improve the usefulness of models for understanding energy and environmental problems. In 2005 the Forum received the prestigious Adelman-Frankel Award from the International Association for Energy Economics for its "unique and innovative contribution to the field of energy economics."

    His current research interests are modeling energy security, energy price shocks, energy market impacts of environmental policies, and international natural gas and LNG markets. In 2002 he won the Best Paper Award from the Energy Journal for a paper co-authored with Professor Dermot Gately of New York University.

    He is a Senior Fellow and a past-President of the United States Association for Energy Economics and a member of the National Petroleum Council. He was also Vice-President for Publications for the International Association for Energy Economics and a member of the American Statistical Association's Committee on Energy Data. Previously, he served on a joint USA-Russian National Academy of Sciences Panel on energy conservation research and development.

    Huntington has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the California Energy Commission.

    Prior to coming to Stanford in 1980, he held positions in the corporate and government sectors with Data Resources Inc., the U.S. Federal Energy Administration, and the Public Utilities Authority in Monrovia, Liberia (as a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer).

  • Ramesh Johari

    Ramesh Johari

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioJohari is broadly interested in the design, economic analysis, and operation of online platforms, as well as statistical and machine learning techniques used by these platforms (such as search, recommendation, matching, and pricing algorithms).

  • Riitta Katila

    Riitta Katila

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe question that drives Prof. Katila's research is how technology-based firms with significant resources can stay innovative. Her work lies at the intersection of the fields of technology, innovation, and strategy and focuses on strategies that enable organizations to discover, develop and commercialize technologies. She combines theory with longitudinal large-sample data (e.g., robotics, biomedical, multi-industry datasets), background fieldwork, and state-of-the-art quantitative methods. The ultimate objective is to understand what makes technology-based firms successful.

    To answer this question, Prof. Katila conducts two interrelated streams of research. She studies (1) strategies that help firms leverage their existing resources (leverage stream), and (2) strategies through which firms can acquire new resources (acquisition stream) to create innovation. Her early contributions were firm centric while recent contributions focus on innovation in the context of competitive interaction.

    Professor Katila's work has appeared in the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Science, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Research Policy and other outlets. In her work, supported by the National Science Foundation, Katila examines how firms create new products successfully. Focusing on the robotics and medical device industries, she investigates how different search approaches, such as the exploitation of existing knowledge and the exploration for new knowledge, influence the kinds of new products that technology-intensive firms introduce. Professor Katila has served on the editorial boards of several leading journals including Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Science, Strategic Organization, and the Strategic Management Journal.

  • Irene Lo

    Irene Lo

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioIrene is an assistant professor in Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. Her research is on designing matching markets and assignment processes to improve market outcomes, with a focus on public sector applications and socially responsible operations research. She is also interested in mechanism design for social good and graph theory.

  • David Luenberger

    David Luenberger

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioDavid G. Luenberger received the B.S. degree from the California Institute of Technology and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University, all in Electrical Engineering. Since 1963 he has been on the faculty of Stanford University. He helped found the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems, now merged to become the Department of Management Science and Engineering, where his is currently a professor.

    He served as Technical Assistant to the President's Science Advisor in 1971-72, was Guest Professor at the Technical University of Denmark (1986), Visiting Professor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1976), and served as Department Chairman at Stanford (1980-1991).

    His awards include: Member of the National Academy of Engineering (2008), the Bode Lecture Prize of the Control Systems Society (1990), the Oldenburger Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1995), and the Expository Writing Award of the Institute of Operations Research and Management Science (1999) He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (since 1975).

    Interests:
    His overall interest is the application of mathematics to issues in control, planning, and decision making. He has worked in the technical fields of control theory, optimization theory and algorithms, and investment theory for portfolios and project evaluation. He has published six major textbooks: Optimization by Vector Space Methods, Linear and Nonlinear Programming (jointly with Yinyu Ye), Introduction to Dynamic Systems, Microeconomic theory, Investment Science, and Information Science. He has published over eighty journal papers.

  • Robert McGinn

    Robert McGinn

    Professor (Teaching) of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsexploration of ethical issues related to nanotechnology

  • Paul Milgrom

    Paul Milgrom

    Shirley R. and Leonard W. Ely, Jr. Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Professor of Economics, Senior Fellow at SIEPR and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the GSB and of Management Science and Engineering

    BioPaul Milgrom is the Shirley and Leonard Ely professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Department of Economics at Stanford University and professor, by courtesy, in the Stanford Graduate School of Business and in the Department of Management Sciences and Engineering. Born in Detroit, Michigan on April 20, 1948, he is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a winner of the 2008 Nemmers Prize in Economics, the 2012 BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge award, the 2017 CME-MSRI prize for Innovative Quantitative Applications, and the 2018 Carty Award for the Advancement of Science.

    Milgrom is known for his work on innovative resource allocation methods, particularly in radio spectrum. He is coinventor of the simultaneous multiple round auction and the combinatorial clock auction. He also led the design team for the FCC's 2017 incentive auction, which reallocated spectrum from television broadcast to mobile broadband.

    According to his BBVA Award citation: “Paul Milgrom has made seminal contributions to an unusually wide range of fields of economics including auctions, market design, contracts and incentives, industrial economics, economics of organizations, finance, and game theory.” As counted by Google Scholar, Milgrom’s books and articles have received more than 80,000 citations.

    Finally, Milgrom has been a successful adviser of graduate students, winning the 2017 H&S Dean's award for Excellence in Graduate Education.

  • Walter Murray

    Walter Murray

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Murray's research interests include numerical optimization, numerical linear algebra, sparse matrix methods, optimization software and applications of optimization. He has authored two books (Practical Optimization and Optimization and Numerical Linear Algebra) and over eighty papers. In addition to his University work he has extensive consulting experience with industry, government, and commerce.

  • Doug Owens

    Doug Owens

    Henry J. Kaiser, Jr. Professor, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research uses decision modeling, cost-effectiveness analysis, and meta-analysis to evaluate clinical and health policy problems. Much of my work involves development of national guidelines for prevention and treatment.

  • M Elisabeth Pate-Cornell

    M Elisabeth Pate-Cornell

    Burton J. and DeeDee McMurtry Professor in the School of Engineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2021 To 12/31/2021

    BioDr. Marie-Elisabeth Paté-Cornell is the Burt and Deedee McMurtry Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor and Founding Chair (2000-2011) of the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University. Her specialty is engineering risk analysis with application to complex systems (space, medical, offshore oil platforms, etc.). Her earlier research has focused on the optimization of warning systems and the explicit inclusion of human and organizational factors in the analysis of systems’ failure risks. Her recent work is on the use of game theory in risk analysis with applications that have included counter-terrorism, nuclear counter-proliferation problems and cyber security. She is the author of more than one hundred publications, and the co-editor of a book on Perspectives on Complex Global Problems (2016).

    She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, of the French Académie des Technologies, of the NASA Advisory Council and of several boards including the Board of Advisors of the Naval Postgraduate School and the Navy War College. Dr. Paté-Cornell was a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board from December 2001 to 2008, of the board of the Aerospace Corporation (2004-2013) of Draper Laboratory (2009-2016), and of InQtel (2006-2017). She holds a BS in Mathematics and Physics, Marseille (France), an Engineering degree (Applied Math/CS) from the Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble (France), an MS in Operations Research and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems, both from Stanford University.

    She and her late husband, Dr. Allin Cornell had two children, Philip Cornell (born 1981) and Ariane Cornell (1984). She is married to Admiral James O. Ellis Jr. (US Navy, Ret.).

  • Markus Pelger

    Markus Pelger

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis research focuses on understanding and managing financial risk. He develops mathematical financial model and statistical methods, analyzes financial data and engineers computational techniques. His research is divided into three streams: stochastic financial modeling, high-frequency statistics and statistical learning in high-dimensional financial data sets. His most recent work includes developing machine learning solutions to big-data problems in empirical risk management and asset pricing.

  • Amin Saberi

    Amin Saberi

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2021 To 03/31/2022

    BioAmin Saberi is an Associate Professor and 3COM faculty scholar in Stanford University. He received his B.Sc. from Sharif University of Technology and his Ph.D. from Georgia Institute of Technology in Computer Science. His research interests include algorithms, approximation algorithms, and algorithmic aspects of games, markets, and networks. Amin Saberi's research is supported by National Science Foundation (under grants CCF 0546889, 0729586, and 0915145), Library of Congress, Stanford Clean Slate Design for the Internet, and Google. His most recent awards include an Alfred Sloan Fellowship and best paper awards in FOCS 2011 and SODA 2010.

  • Michael Saunders

    Michael Saunders

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioSaunders develops mathematical methods for solving large-scale constrained optimization problems and large systems of equations. He also implements such methods as general-purpose software to allow their use in many areas of engineering, science, and business. He is co-developer of the large-scale optimizers MINOS, SNOPT, SQOPT, PDCO, the dense QP and NLP solvers LSSOL, QPOPT, NPSOL, and the linear equation solvers SYMMLQ, MINRES, MINRES-QLP, LSQR, LSMR, LSLQ, LNLQ, LSRN, LUSOL.

  • Tina Seelig

    Tina Seelig

    Professor of the Practice, Management Science and Engineering

    BioDr. Tina Seelig is Executive Director of the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program and Professor of the Practice in the Department of Management Science and Engineering (MS&E) at Stanford University. She is also a faculty director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP), the entrepreneurship center at Stanford University's School of Engineering. She teaches courses on creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship in MS&E and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school) at Stanford.

    In 2014 Dr. Seelig was honored with the SVForum Visionary Award, and in 2009 she received the Gordon Prize from the National Academy of Engineering, recognizing her as a national leader in engineering education. She received the 2014 MS&E Award for Graduate Teaching, the 2008 National Olympus Innovation Award, and the 2005 Stanford Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. In 2018, Dr Seelig received the Richard W. Lyman Award which recognizes one outstanding Stanford faculty member for extraordinary service to the alumni community and Stanford Alumni Association programs.

    Dr. Seelig earned a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Stanford University School of Medicine where she studied neuroplasticity. She has worked as a management consultant for Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, as a multimedia producer at Compaq Computer Corporation, and was the founder of a multimedia company called BookBrowser.

    She has written 17 books and educational games. Her books include The Epicurean Laboratory and Incredible Edible Science, which focus on the chemistry of cooking, published by Scientific American; and a dozen games for children, called "Games for Your Brain," published by Chronicle Books. Her newest books, published by HarperCollins, explore the process of bringing ideas to fruition. They include What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 (2009), inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity (2012), and Creativity Rules (September 2017.)

  • Ross Shachter

    Ross Shachter

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Shachter's research has focused on the representation, manipulation, and analysis of uncertainty and probabilistic reasoning in decision systems. As part of this work, he developed the DAVID influence diagram processing system for the Macintosh. He has developed models scheduling patients for cancer follow-up, and analyzing vaccination strategies for HIV and Helobacter pylori.

  • Aaron Sidford

    Aaron Sidford

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests lie broadly in the optimization, the theory of computation, and the design and analysis of algorithms. I am particularly interested in work at the intersection of continuous optimization, graph theory, numerical linear algebra, and data structures.

  • Rosanne Marie Siino

    Rosanne Marie Siino

    Lecturer

    BioRosanne was on the founding team of Netscape in the 1990s. She brings the same creativity, “think big” attitude and positive energy that launched the first commercially successful web browser to her teaching and consulting. After a long career in high-tech marketing, Rosanne received a doctorate in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford, where she has been a lecturer since 2007. Rosanne teaches undergraduate and graduate classes in organizational dynamics, and advises technology companies, startups, and nonprofits on effective teamwork, management and messaging.

  • Robert Sutton

    Robert Sutton

    Professor of Management Science & Engineering and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    BioRobert Sutton is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and a Professor of Organizational Behavior (by courtesy) at Stanford. Sutton has been teaching classes on the psychology of business and management at Stanford since 1983. He is co-founder of the Center for Work, Technology and Organization, which he co-directed from 1996 to 2006. He is also co-founder of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (which everyone calls “the d school”). Sutton and Stanford Business School's Huggy Rao recently launched the Designing Organizational Change Project, which is hosted by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program

    Sutton studies innovation, leadership, the links between managerial knowledge and organization action, scaling excellence, and workplace dynamics. He has published over 100 articles and chapters on these topics in peer-reviewed journals and the popular press. Sutton’s books include Weird Ideas That Work: 11 ½ Practices for Promoting, Managing, and Sustaining Innovation, The Knowing-Doing Gap: How Smart Firms Turn Knowledge into Action (with Jeffrey Pfeffer), and Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based Management (with Jeffrey Pfeffer). The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t and Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best…. and Survive the Worst are both New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestsellers. His last book, Scaling-Up Excellence: Getting to More without Settling for Less (with Huggy Rao), was published in 2014 and is a Wall Street Journal and Publisher’s Weekly bestseller. Sutton's next book, The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal With People Who Treat You Like Dirt, will be published in September of 2017.

    Professor Sutton’s honors include the award for the best paper published in the Academy of Management Journal in 1989, the Eugene L. Grant Award for Excellence in Teaching, selection by Business 2.0 as a leading “management guru” in 2002, and the award for the best article published in the Academy of Management Review in 2005. Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense was selected as the best business book of 2006 by the Toronto Globe and Mail. Sutton was named as one of 10 “B-School All-Stars” by BusinessWeek , which they described as “professors who are influencing contemporary business thinking far beyond academia.” In 2014, the London Business School honored Sutton with the Sumantra Ghoshal Award for Rigour and Relevance in the Study of Management.

    Sutton is a Fellow at IDEO, a Senior Scientist at Gallup, and academic director of two Stanford executive education programs:Customer-Focused Innovation and the online Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate. His personal website is at www.bobsutton.net and he also blogs at Harvard Business Review and as an “influencer” on LinkedIn. Sutton tweets @work_matters.

  • James Sweeney

    James Sweeney

    Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, at the Precourt Institute for Energy and, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDeterminants of energy efficiency opportunities, barriers, and policy options. Emphasis on behavioral issues, including personal, corporate, or organizational. Behavior may be motivated by economic incentives, social, or cultural factors, or more generally, by a combination of these factors. Systems analysis questions of energy use.

  • Edison Tse

    Edison Tse

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Tse received his BS, MS, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the Director of Asia Center of Management Science and Engineering, which has the charter of developing executive training programs for executives in Asian enterprises, conducting research on development of the emerging economy in Asia and establishing research affiliations with Asian enterprises, with a special focus in Greater China: China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.
    In 1973, he received the prestigious Donald Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in recognition of his outstanding contribution in the field of Automatic Control. He had served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions of Automatic Control, and a co-editor of the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, which he co-founded. In recent years he dedicated his research effort in dynamic entrepreneurial strategy and transformation of Chinese production economy to innovation economy. He developed a significant theory on innovation synergistic to Chinese culture and its application to China industry transformation. Over the years he has made valuable contributions in the field of engineering, economics, and business creation and expansion. He has published over 180 papers on his research activities. Since March 2003, he has been teaching his new found theory on China innovation and Industry Transformation to high level Chinese government officials and Chinese executives.
    Since 2007, he co-directed a Stanford Financial Engineering Certificate Program in Hong Kong that upgrades the quality of managers and traders in the financial institutions in Hong Kong. Since 2009, he co-directed a Stanford program on Regional Industry Transformation and Public Administration that was attended by city officials from various cities in China, and directs a Stanford program on Chinese Industry Transformation and Innovation that was attended by executives from Chinese enterprises. Prof. Tse is the author of over 150 articles in the fields of systems and control. He received the 1973 Donald P. Eckman Award for outstanding achievement in the field of automatic control. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he worked at Systems Control, Inc., where he formulated and solved numerous problems in defense, electric power, forecasting and marketing.
    At Stanford, he has developed computer integrated systems to support fishery management policy decisions, management and control of the manufacturing enterprise, and industrial competitive analysis and product development. He is currently conducting research on building core competence within an enterprise to gain competitive advantage. He established the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control and is now a member of its Advisory Board. His national society memberships include the Econometric Society, IEEE, ORSA, and TIMS. Tse developed a framework for analyzing dynamic competitive strategy based on a dynamic model of grabber-holder dynamics that describes the forces that would shape the formation of an ecosystem supporting an exciting vision. Within such a framework, he developed dynamic strategies for firms entering an emerging market, latecomers that want to wedge into a matured market, and firms that need to turn danger into opportunities. Tse’s recent interests are in extending the theory to analyzing the dynamic competition in network economy, regional technology center development, and applying the theory of dynamic strategies to the wireless, airport, real estate, and financial industries in China.

  • Johan Ugander

    Johan Ugander

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Ugander's research develops algorithmic and statistical frameworks for analyzing social networks, social systems, and other large-scale data-rich contexts. He is particularly interested in the challenges of causal inference and experimentation in these complex domains. His work commonly falls at the intersections of graph theory, machine learning, statistics, optimization, and algorithm design.

  • Melissa Valentine

    Melissa Valentine

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMelissa Valentine is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Management Science and Engineering Department, and co-director of the Center for Work, Technology, and Organization (WTO).

    Prof Valentine's research focuses on understanding how new technologies change work and organizations. She conducts in-depth observational studies to develop new understanding about new forms of organizing. Her work makes contributions to understanding classic and longstanding challenges in designing groups and organizations (e.g., the role of hierarchy, how to implement change, team stability vs. flexibility) but also brings in deep knowledge of how the rise of information technology has made possible new and different team and organizational forms. Her most recent study examined how the deployment of new algorithms changed the organizational structure of a retail tech company.

    Prof. Valentine has won awards for both research and teaching. She and collaborators won a Best Paper Award at the CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and the Outstanding Paper with Practical Implications award from the Organizational Behavior division of the Academy of Management. In 2013, she won the Organization Science/INFORMS dissertation proposal competition and received her PhD from Harvard University.

  • Benjamin Van Roy

    Benjamin Van Roy

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, of Management Science and Engineering

    BioBenjamin Van Roy is a Professor at Stanford University, where he has served on the faculty since 1998. His research focuses on understanding how an agent interacting with a poorly understood environment can learn over time to make effective decisions. He is interested in the design of efficient reinforcement learning algorithms, understanding what is possible or impossible in this domain, and applying the technology toward the benefit of society. Beyond academia, he leads a DeepMind Research team in Mountain View, and has also led research programs at Unica (acquired by IBM), Enuvis (acquired by SiRF), and Morgan Stanley.

    He is a Fellow of INFORMS and IEEE and has served on the editorial boards of Machine Learning, Mathematics of Operations Research, for which he co-edits the Learning Theory Area, Operations Research, for which he edited the Financial Engineering Area, and the INFORMS Journal on Optimization.

    He received the SB in Computer Science and Engineering and the SM and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, all from MIT. He has been a recipient of the MIT George C. Newton Undergraduate Laboratory Project Award, the MIT Morris J. Levin Memorial Master's Thesis Award, the MIT George M. Sprowls Doctoral Dissertation Award, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Stanford Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the Management Science and Engineering Department's Graduate Teaching Award. He has held visiting positions as the Wolfgang and Helga Gaul Visiting Professor at the University of Karlsruhe, the Chin Sophonpanich Foundation Professor and the InTouch Professor at Chulalongkorn University, a Visiting Professor at the National University of Singapore, and a Visiting Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen.

  • John Weyant

    John Weyant

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioJohn P. Weyant is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and Director of the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy and an an affiliated faculty member of the Stanford School of Earth, Environment and Energy Sciences, the Woods Institute for the Environment, and the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. His current research focuses on analysis of multi-sector, multi-region coupled human and earth systems dynamics, global change systems analysis, energy technology assessment, and models for strategic planning.

    Weyant was a founder and serves as chairman of the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC), a fourteen-year old collaboration among over 60 member institutions from around the world. He has been an active adviser to the United Nations, the European Commission, U.S.Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency. In California, he has been and adviser to the California Air Resources, the California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission..

    Weyant was awarded the US Association for Energy Economics’ 2008 Adelmann-Frankel award for unique and innovative contributions to the field of energy economics and the award for outstanding lifetime contributions to the Profession for 2017 from the International Association for Energy Economics, and a Life Time Achievement award from the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium in 2018. Weyant was honored in 2007 as a major contributor to the Nobel Peace prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and in 2008 by Chairman Mary Nichols for contributions to the to the California Air Resources Board's Economic and Technology Advancement Advisory Committee on AB 32.

    Fields of Specialization:
    Energy/Environmental Policy Analysis, Strategic Planning

    Interests:
    Overall goal is to accelerate the use of systems models at state, country, and global scales, aiming to provide the best available information and insights to government and private-sector decision makers. Specific areas include energy, climate change, and sustainable development policy, including emerging technologies and market design alternatives. Draws on concepts and techniques from science and engineering fundamentals (e.g., thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, materials science, and electrical power systems), operations research, economics, finance, and decision theory.

  • Yinyu Ye

    Yinyu Ye

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests include Continuous and Discrete Optimization, Algorithm Development and Analyses, Algorithmic Game/Market Theory and Mechanism-Design, Markov Decision Process and Reinforcement Learning, Dynamic/Online Optimization and Resource Allocation, and Stochastic and Robust Decision Making. These areas have been the unique and core disciplines of MS&E, and extended to new application areas in AI, Machine Learning, Data Science, and Business Analytics.