Graduate School of Education


Showing 1-50 of 123 Results

  • Subini Ancy Annamma

    Subini Ancy Annamma

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioPrior to her doctoral studies, Subini Ancy Annamma was a special education teacher in both public schools and youth prisons. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Her research critically examines the ways students are criminalized and resist that criminalization through the mutually constitutive nature of racism and ableism, how they interlock with other marginalizing oppressions, and how these intersections impact youth education trajectories in urban schools and youth prisons. Further, she positions students as knowledge generators, exploring how their narratives can inform teacher and special education. Dr. Annamma’s book, The Pedagogy of Pathologization (Routledge, 2018) focuses on the education trajectories of incarcerated disabled girls of color and has won the 2019 AESA Critic’s Choice Book Award & 2018 NWSA Alison Piepmeier Book Prize. Dr. Annamma is a past Ford Postdoctoral Fellow, AERA Division G Early Career Awardee, Critical Race Studies in Education Associate Emerging Scholar recipient, Western Social Science Association's Outstanding Emerging Scholar, and AERA Minority Dissertation Awardee. Dr. Annamma’s work has been published in scholarly journals such as Educational Researcher, Teachers College Record, Review of Research in Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Theory Into Practice, Race Ethnicity and Education, Qualitative Inquiry, among others.

  • anthony lising antonio

    anthony lising antonio

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransitions to postsecondary education; racial, ethnic, and religious minority college student development.

  • Nicole Ardoin

    Nicole Ardoin

    Director, E-IPER, Associate Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCommunity Involvement
    Community/Youth Development and Organizations
    Diversity
    Environmental Education
    Ethnography
    Evaluation
    Organizations
    Qualitative Research Methods

  • Alfredo J. Artiles

    Alfredo J. Artiles

    Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education

    BioDr. Artiles is Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education. His scholarship examines the dual nature of disability as an object of protection and a tool of stratification. Professor Artiles studies how protections afforded by disability status can unwittingly stratify educational opportunities for racialized groups and is advancing responses to these inequities. For instance, he is studying the cultural-historical contexts of racial disparities in special education and whether a disability diagnosis is associated with differential consequences for minoritized groups (e.g., segregation, quality and type of services). He and his colleagues have led national and regional technical assistance initiatives at the state and school district levels to address these equity paradoxes. Current research projects include:

    * Examining the role of socio-cultural influences (e.g., histories of racial inequities in communities and schools) in educators’ interpretations and responses to chronic school district citations for racial disparities in special education.
    * Mapping the changing meanings of “disability” and “inclusive education” and the ways in which disability-race intersections become visible or invisible across identification policies, practices and settings at the district and school levels.
    * Piloting a participatory model with youth of color with/without disabilities grounded in the arts and humanities to (re)structure school discipline policies and practices.
    * Documenting how teachers and other school professionals decide whether dual language learners' academic or behavioral difficulties are related to disabilities.
    * Analyzing equity consequences of inclusive education implementation in Global South nations.

    Dr. Artiles is Honorary Professor at the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) and received an honorary doctorate from the University of Göteborgs (Sweden). He served on the Obama White House Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. Dr. Artiles is an elected member of the National Academy of Education and Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), the Learning Policy Institute and the National Education Policy Center. He was a resident fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He was elected AERA Vice-President to lead its Social Context of Education Division. Dr. Artiles has received numerous awards for his scholarly work and mentoring activities, including AERA’s Palmer O. Johnson Award, the AERA Review of Research Award, and Mentoring Awards from AERA’s Division on Social Contexts of Education, the Spencer Foundation, and Arizona State University. He was selected Distinguished Alumni from the University of Virginia School of Education. Professor Artiles has served on various consensus study panels of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine focusing on English learners, the Future of Educational Research, and Opportunity Gaps for Young Children.

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and a Faculty Leader at Stanford’s Center for Longevity. He earned a B.A. cum laude from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford. In 2020, IEEE recognized his work with “The Virtual/Augmented Reality Technical Achievement Award”.

    He has published more than 200 academic papers, spanning the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, linguistics, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for over 20 years.

    Bailenson consults pro bono on Virtual Reality policy for government agencies including the State Department, the US Senate, Congress, the California Supreme Court, the Federal Communication Committee, the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, and the National Institutes of Health.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, emerged as an Amazon Best-seller eight years after its initial publication, and was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for Harvard Business Review, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed six Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab’s research has exhibited publicly at museums and aquariums, including a permanent installation at the San Jose Tech Museum.

  • Arnetha F. Ball

    Arnetha F. Ball

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLanguage, Literacies, and Studies in Teacher Professional Development; research on the writing and writing instruction of culturally and linguistically diverse students; preparing teachers to teach diverse student populations in culturally and linguistically complex classrooms; linking sociocultural and linguistic theory to educational practice; and using the linguistic resources present among culturally diverse populations to enhance curriculum and instruction. She is currently conducting research on the implementation of her "Model of Generative Change" (Ball 2009) in pre-service teacher education, inservice teacher professional development, and a secondary pipeline program designed to "grow our own next generation of excellent teachers for urban schools." Over the last few years she has been collecting data in New Zealand, South Africa, Australia, and the United States on the preparation of teachers to work with historically marginalized populations. Her research on the use of writing as a pedagogical tool to facilitate generative thinking is ongoing and her most recent project looks at the development of blended online learning environments that are designed to prepare teachers to work effectively with diverse student populations in transnational contexts.

  • Adam Banks

    Adam Banks

    Professor of Education

    BioCommitted teacher. Midnight Believer. A Slow Jam in a Hip Hop world. Cerebral and silly, outgoing and a homebody. Vernacular and grounded but academic and idealistic too. Convinced that Donny Hathaway is the most compelling artist of the entire soul and funk era, and that we still don't give Patrice Rushen enough love. I'm a crate digger, and DJ with words and ideas, and I believe that the people, voices and communities we bring with us to Stanford are every bit as important as those with which we engage here at Stanford.

    Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, I come to Stanford from the University of Kentucky, where I served on the faculty of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies and prior to that, from Syracuse University, as a member of the faculty of the Writing Program. In addition to these appointments I served as the Langston Hughes Visiting Professor of English at the University of Kansas and, jointly with Andrea Lunsford, as the Rocky Gooch Visiting Professor for the Bread Loaf School of English.

    My scholarship lies at the intersections of writing, rhetoric and technology issues; my specialized interests include African American rhetoric, community literacy, digital rhetorics and digital humanities. My most recent book is titled Digital Griots: African American Rhetoric in a Multimedia Age, and my current digital/book project is titled Technologizing Funk/Funkin Technology: Critical Digital Literacies and the Trope of the Talking Book.

  • Ralph Banks

    Ralph Banks

    The Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioRalph Richard Banks (BA ’87, MA ’87) is the Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor, by courtesy, at the School of Education. A native of Cleveland, Ohio and a graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Law School (JD 1994), Banks has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 1998. Prior to joining the law school, he practiced law at O’Melveny & Myers, was the Reginald F. Lewis Fellow at Harvard Law School and clerked for a federal judge, the Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. (then of the Southern District of New York). Professor Banks teaches and writes about family law, employment discrimination law and race and the law. He is the author of Is Marriage for White People? How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone. At Stanford, he is affiliated with the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and the Ethnicity, the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. His writings have appeared in a wide range of popular and scholarly publications, including the Stanford Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. He has been interviewed and quoted by numerous print and broadcast media, including ABC News/Nightline, National Public Radio, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

  • Donald Barr

    Donald Barr

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, at the Graduate School of Education

    BioDonald Barr is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Stanford School of Medicine, and Professor by Courtesy in the Graduate School of Education. He teaches in the Undergraduate Program in Human Biology, where he helped to found Human Biology's curriculum in health policy. His research has studied the effect of the organizational structure of the U.S. medical care delivery system on the quality of primary care. He has also studied cultural and linguistic barriers to health care access for low-income patients, and factors associated with higher rates of attrition from pre-medical studies among minority students at Stanford and other universities. The fourth edition of his book, Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing, and Delivery of Health Care in America, was published in 2016. The third edition of his book, Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity and the Social Determinants of Health, was published in 2019. In June 2003 Dr. Barr was awarded the Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contribution to Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. In 2006 he received the Miriam Aaron Roland Prize, which recognizes Stanford faculty who engage and involve students in integrating academic scholarship with significant and meaningful volunteer service to society.

  • Brigid Barron

    Brigid Barron

    Margaret Jacks Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include the longitudinal documentation of learner pathways to engagement, studies of families as technology-supported learning teams, and the roles that personal learning networks play in catalyzing and sustaining interest-driven learning She is founder of the YouthLAB at Stanford, and a co-lead of TELOS, a Stanford Graduate School of Education Initiative to investigate how technologies can provide more equitable access to learning opportunities.

  • Eric Bettinger

    Eric Bettinger

    Conley DeAngelis Family Professor, Professor of Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBettinger, Eric and Bridget Long. “Simplification and Incentives: A Randomized Experiment to Increase College Savings."

    Antonio, Anthony, Eric Bettinger, Brent Evans, Jesse Foster, and Rie Kijima. “The Effect of High School College Advisement: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Texas.”

    Bettinger, Eric, Michael Kremer, Maurice Kugler, and Juan Saavedra. “The Effect of Educational Vouchers in Colombia on Students’ Labor Market Outcomes.”

    Bettinger, Eric, Oded Gurantz, Laura Kawano, and Bruce Sacerdote. "The Long-run Impacts of Merit Aid: Evidence from California's Cal-Grant."

    Bettinger, Eric, Lindsay Fox, Susanna Loeb, and Eric Taylor, “Changing Distributions: How Online College Classes Alter Student and Professor Performance.”

  • Jo Boaler

    Jo Boaler

    Nomellini and Olivier Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudying the Impact of a Mathematical Mindset Summer Intervention, HapCaps: Design and Validation of Haptic Devices for improving Finger Perception (with engineering & neuroscience) The effectiveness of a student online class (https://lagunita.stanford.edu/courses/Education/EDUC115-S/Spring2014/about) (NSF). Studies on mathematics and mindset with Carol Dweck and Greg Walton (various funders). Studying an online network and it's impact on teaching and learning (Gates foundation)

  • Hilda Borko

    Hilda Borko

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsToward a Scalable Model of Mathematics Professional Development: A Field Study of Preparing Facilitators to Implement the Problem-Solving Cycle

    The Problem-Solving Cycle (PSC) model of mathematics professional development encourages teachers to become part of a collaborative and supportive learning community. As they participate in the PSC, teachers think deeply about both mathematics content and instruction, and they explore their instructional practices with their colleagues through the use of video and other classroom artifacts. One iteration of the PSC consists of three interconnected professional development workshops, all organized around a rich mathematical task. During Workshop 1, teachers collaboratively solve the mathematical task and develop plans for teaching it to their own students. Shortly after the workshop, the teachers implement the problem with their own students and their lessons are videotaped. In Workshop 2 teachers explore the role they played in implementing the problem. In Workshop 3 teachers critically examine students’ mathematical reasoning.

    The Problem-Solving Cycle model provides a structure for mathematics teachers to work together and share a common mathematical and pedagogical experience. Our previous research suggests that it is a promising model for enhancing teachers’ knowledge and supporting changes in classroom practice.

    In our current project, initiated in Fall 2007, we are working with a group of middle school mathematics teachers in a large urban district to foster their leadership capacity, and specifically to prepare them to facilitate the Problem-Solving Cycle. We will provide 2½ years of preparation and support for teachers who have been designated as “mathematics instructional leaders.” These instructional leaders will in turn implement the PSC with the mathematics teachers in their schools. We will document the range and quality of the instructional leaders’ implementation of the PSC. We will also analyze the impact of the professional development process on the mathematical knowledge and classroom teaching of the instructional leaders and the mathematics teachers with whom they work. In addition, we will analyze the impact on their students’ mathematics achievement. By the conclusion of the project, we anticipate that the participating schools will have the infrastructure and capacity to carry out the PSC indefinitely, using their own resources. In addition, the project will produce a highly refined set of PSC facilitation materials—with a strong emphasis on supporting a linguistically and culturally diverse student population—that can be widely disseminated.

  • Bryan Brown

    Bryan Brown

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Brown's current research examines issues of stress, culture, and language. His work examines how science is taught is ways that may alienate urban students due to the approach to language instruction. This work includes experimental work involving technology based education and inner city teaching practices.

  • Eamonn Callan

    Eamonn Callan

    Pigott Family School of Education Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCivic and moral education; ethical and civic dimensions of educational policy; multicultural education and minority rights in education.

  • Janet Carlson

    Janet Carlson

    Associate Professor (Research) of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) for teaching science, design of professional learning for teachers including equity, core practices, teacher leadership, research-practice partnerships

  • Martin Carnoy

    Martin Carnoy

    Vida Jacks Professor of Education and Lemann Foundation Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearching econometric models of quality of education in Latin America and Southern Africa. Studying changes in university financing and the quality of engineering and science tertiary education in China, India, and Russia.

  • Lisa J. Chamberlain

    Lisa J. Chamberlain

    Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChild Health disparities - Projects focus on elucidating the non-clinical factors that impact access to appropriate care for children with chronic illness.

    Health Policy - Projects explore the intersection of medicine as a profession and formation of child health policy.

  • Anne Harper Charity Hudley

    Anne Harper Charity Hudley

    Associate Dean of Educational Affairs and Professor of Education

    BioAnne H. Charity Hudley, Ph.D., is Professor of Education at Stanford University and Professor of African-American Studies and Linguistics by courtesy. She is affiliated with the Center for Comparative Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) and the Symbolic Systems Program. Her research and publications address the relationship between language variation and educational practices and policies from preschool through graduate school. She has a particular emphasis on creating high-impact practices for underrepresented students in higher education. Charity Hudley is the co-author of three books: The Indispensable Guide to Undergraduate Research; We Do Language: English Language Variation in the Secondary English Classroom, and Understanding English Language Variation in U.S. Schools. Her fourth book, Talking College, will appear in the spring of 2022.

    Her other publications have appeared in Language, The Journal of English Linguistics, Child Development, Language Variation, and Change, American Speech, Language and Linguistics Compass, Perspectives on Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations, and many book collections, including The Handbook of African-American Psychology, Ethnolinguistic Diversity and Literacy Education, Oxford Handbook of Sociolinguistics, and Oxford Handbook of Language in Society. She has been an invited speaker for numerous keynotes and academic meetings, provides lectures and workshops for K-12 teachers and generously contributes to community initiatives and public intellectual work.

    Her significant contributions to the field have been recognized with a Public Engagement Award from the Society for Linguistic Anthropology; an award from the Linguistic Society of America; and funding from NIH, NSF, the Mellon Foundation, and the Ford Foundation, among others. Professor Charity Hudley has served on the Executive Committee of the Linguistic Society of America; the Standing Committee on Research of the National Council of Teachers of English; as a consultant to the National Research Council Committee on Language and Education; and to the NSF’s Committee on Broadening Participation in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Sciences. In addition, she has served as an Associate Editor for Language, served on the editorial board of Language and Linguistics Compass, and the Linguistic Society of America Committee on Linguistics in Higher Education.

    Dr. Charity Hudley was previously the North Hall Endowed Chair in the Linguistics of African America at U.C. Santa Barbara. At U.C. Santa Barbara, she also served as the Director of Undergraduate Research, Vice-Chair of the Council of Planning and Budget, and a Faculty Fellow for the Center for Innovative Teaching, Research, and Learning (CITRAL).

  • Geoffrey Cohen

    Geoffrey Cohen

    James G. March Professor of Organizational Studies in Education and Business, Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMuch of my research examines processes related to identity maintenance and their implications for social problems. One primary aim of my research is the development of theory-driven, rigorously tested intervention strategies that further our understanding of the processes underpinning social problems and that offer solutions to alleviate them. Two key questions lie at the core of my research: “Given that a problem exists, what are its underlying processes?” And, “Once identified, how can these processes be overcome?” One reason for this interest in intervention is my belief that a useful way to understand psychological processes and social systems is to try to change them. We also are interested in how and when seemingly brief interventions, attuned to underlying psychological processes, produce large and long-lasting psychological and behavioral change.

    The methods that my lab uses include laboratory experiments, longitudinal studies, content analyses, and randomized field experiments. One specific area of research addresses the effects of group identity on achievement, with a focus on under-performance and racial and gender achievement gaps. Additional research programs address hiring discrimination, the psychology of closed-mindedness and inter-group conflict, and psychological processes underlying anti-social and health-risk behavior.

  • William Damon

    William Damon

    Professor of Education and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment of purpse through the lifespan; the formation of purpose during adolescence; educational methods for promoting purpose and the capacity for good work.

  • Linda Darling-Hammond

    Linda Darling-Hammond

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the School of Education, Emerita

    BioLinda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emeritus at Stanford University and founding president of the Learning Policy Institute, created to provide high-quality research for policies that enable equitable and empowering education for each and every child. At Stanford she founded the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education and served as faculty sponsor for the Stanford Teacher Education Program, which she helped to redesign.

    Darling-Hammond is past president of the American Educational Research Association and recipient of its awards for Distinguished Contributions to Research, Lifetime Achievement, Research Review, and Research-to-Policy. She is also a member of the American Association of Arts and Sciences and of the National Academy of Education. From 1994–2001, she was executive director of the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, whose 1996 report What Matters Most: Teaching for America’s Future was named one of the most influential reports affecting U.S. education in that decade. In 2006, Darling-Hammond was named one of the nation’s ten most influential people affecting educational policy. In 2008, she directed President Barack Obama's Education Policy Transition Team. She is currently President of the California State Board of Education.

    Darling-Hammond began her career as a public school teacher and co-founded both a preschool and a public high school. She served as Director of the RAND Corporation’s education program and as an endowed professor at Columbia University, Teachers College before coming to Stanford. She has consulted widely with federal, state and local officials and educators on strategies for improving education policies and practices and is the recipient of 14 honorary degrees in the U.S. and internationally. Among her more than 600 publications are a number of award-winning books, including The Right to Learn, Teaching as the Learning Profession, Preparing Teachers for a Changing World and The Flat World and Education: How America's Commitment will Determine our Future. She received an Ed.D. from Temple University (with highest distinction) and a B.A. from Yale University (magna cum laude).

  • Thomas Dee

    Thomas Dee

    Barnett Family Professor, Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioThomas S. Dee, Ph.D., is the Barnett Family Professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education (GSE), a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and the Faculty Director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities. His research focuses largely on the use of quantitative methods to inform contemporary issues of public policy and practice. The Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) awarded his collaborative research the Raymond Vernon Memorial Award in 2015 and again in 2019. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Educational Research Journal, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Education Finance and Policy.

  • Benjamin Domingue

    Benjamin Domingue

    Assistant Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have two portfolios of research. The first focuses on applications of psychometric models to item response data. The second focuses on the integration of genetic data into social science inquiry.

  • Carol Dweck

    Carol Dweck

    Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioMy work bridges developmental psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology, and examines the self-conceptions people use to structure the self and guide their behavior. My research looks at the origins of these self-conceptions, their role in motivation and self-regulation, and their impact on achievement and interpersonal processes.

  • Philip Andrew Fisher

    Philip Andrew Fisher

    Professor of Education

    BioDr. Philip Fisher is a Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Center on the Developing Child and a member of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, both based at Harvard University. His research, which has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1999, focuses on developing and evaluating scalable early childhood interventions in communities, and on translating scientific knowledge regarding healthy development under conditions of adversity for use in social policy and programs. He is particularly interested in the effects of early stressful experiences on children's neurobiological and psychological development, and in prevention and treatment programs for improving children's functioning in areas such as relationships with caregivers and peers, social-emotional development, and academic achievement. He is currently the lead investigator in the ongoing RAPID-EC project, a national survey on the well-being of households with young children during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Fisher is also interested in the brain's plasticity in the context of therapeutic interventions. He is the developer of a number of widely implemented evidence-based interventions for supporting healthy child development in the context of social and economic adversity, including Treatment Foster Care Oregon for Preschoolers (TFCO-P), Kids in Transition to School (KITS), and Filming Interactions to Nurture Development (FIND). He has published over 200 scientific papers in peer reviewed journals. He is the recipient of the 2012 Society for Prevention Research Translational Science Award, and a 2019 Fellow of the American Psychological Society.

  • Karin Forssell

    Karin Forssell

    Senior Lecturer of Education

    BioDr. Karin Forssell is the director of the Learning Design and Technology (LDT) master's program and senior lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Dr. Forssell also directs the GSE Makery, a Stanford maker space where students and faculty learn to make, and make to learn. In her courses, students learn to use research from the learning sciences and learning-centered design processes to create effective digital tools. Her current interests include maker space education, teacher technology adoption, and parenting in a digital world.

    Dr. Forssell draws insights from her many years of concurrent work as a teacher on special assignment for technology in the Palo Alto Unified School District. Dr. Forssell earned her bachelor's degree in linguistics, master's degree in education, and doctorate in learning sciences and technology design at Stanford University.

  • Antero Godina Garcia

    Antero Godina Garcia

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAntero's current research focuses on learning practices in gaming communities; critical literacies and civic identities in ELA classrooms; youth participatory action research; and sociocultural approaches to care and healing in classrooms.

  • Shelley Goldman

    Shelley Goldman

    Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs and for Student Affairs and Professor (Teaching) of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUse and integration of digital technologies for teaching and learning; learning in informal settings, especially learning mathematics and science within families; bringing the tools and mindsets of design thinking to K-12 classrooms and to broadening STEM participation.

  • Pamela Grossman

    Pamela Grossman

    Nomellini-Olivier Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudy of classroom practice in middle school English Language Arts (with Susanna Loeb), funded by the Carnegie Corporation;

    Study of pathways into teaching in New York City Schools (with Don Boyd, Hamilton Lankford, Susanna Loeb, and Jim Wyckoff).

    Cross-professional study of the teaching of practice in programs to prepare teachers, clergy, and clinical psychologists (funded by the Spencer Foundation).

  • Patricia Gumport

    Patricia Gumport

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHigher education and society, academic restructuring, public higher education, leadership development, new forms of collaboration, knowledge creation for impact, diversity and inclusion, intergenerational learning and engagement

  • Nicholas Haber

    Nicholas Haber

    Assistant Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use AI models of of exploratory and social learning in order to better understand early human learning and development, and conversely, I use our understanding of early human learning to make robust AI models that learn in exploratory and social ways. Based on this, I develop AI-powered learning tools for children, geared in particular towards the education of those with developmental issues such as the Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in the mold of my work on the Autism Glass Project. My formal graduate training in pure mathematics involved extending partial differential equation theory in cases involving the propagation of waves through complex media such as the space around a black hole. Since then, I have transitioned to the use of machine learning in developing both learning tools for children with developmental disorders and AI and cognitive models of learning.

  • Edward Haertel

    Edward Haertel

    Jacks Family Professor of Education, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunctions of test scores in discourse about education; how testing shapes ideas of success and failure for students, schools, and public education as a whole.

  • Eric Hanushek

    Eric Hanushek

    Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, by courtesy at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioEric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He has been a leader in the development of economic analysis of educational issues. His widely-cited research spans many policy-related education topics. His latest book, The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth, identifies the close link between the skills of the people and the economic growth of the nation. He has authored or edited 24 books along with over 250 articles. He is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and completed his Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (http://hanushek.stanford.edu/)

  • Michael Hines

    Michael Hines

    Assistant Professor of Education

    BioMichael Hines is an Assistant Professor and historian of American education. Before coming to Stanford Dr. Hines was a Minority Postdoctoral Fellow in History and Education at Teachers College Columbia University. He earned his B.A. in History from Washington University in St. Louis, and his M.A. and PhD in Cultural and Educational Policy Studies from Loyola University Chicago. Prior to pursuing graduate studies, he worked as an ELA and World History teacher in Washington D.C. and Prince George's County Maryland. Currently his research focuses on how African Americans in the early twentieth century created new curricular discourses around race and historical representation. He has been quoted in stories from EdWeek and CNN, and his work has been published in TIME, the Washington Post, the Journal of African American History, the History of Education Quarterly and the Journal of the History Childhood and Youth. His first book, A Worthy Piece of Work, from Beacon Press, is forthcoming.

  • Shashank V. Joshi, MD

    Shashank V. Joshi, MD

    Professor (Teaching) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development) and, by courtesy of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center and, of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Joshi's teaching and research focuses on increasing knowledge and effectiveness of school mental health, youth wellbeing, positive psychology, pediatric psychotherapy and medication interventions. Areas of study include: the therapeutic alliance in medical care, structured psychotherapy interventions, cultural issues in pediatrics, wellbeing promotion and suicide prevention in schools settings, and faculty development in graduate medical education.

  • Connie Juel

    Connie Juel

    Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPoor Reading in Preterms: Neural Basis, Prediction, & Response to Intervention (with Heidi Feldman & Michal Ben Shachar). Five-year grant funded by NICHD, 2012-2017.

    Effects of early elementary school instruction, and specific interventions, on literacy and language growth.

    Longitudinal study of literacy development from preschool through first grade. Focus on classroom factors in 13 kindergarten and 13 first grade classrooms that affect growth across the years in children with different entering skill and language profiles.