School of Engineering


Showing 601-672 of 672 Results

  • Scott Uhlrich

    Scott Uhlrich

    Research Engineer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental biomechanical analysis of healthy and pathological human movement. Real-time biofeedback to modify motor control and kinematics.

    Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation for estimating unmeasurable quantities during movement, like joint forces in individuals with osteoarthritis. Predictive musculoskeletal simulations to design rehabilitation interventions.

    Computer vision, wearable sensing, and machine learning to develop tools that democratize biomechanical analysis and translate biomechanical interventions into clinical practice.

    Quantitative MRI for analyzing the effect of non-surgical treatments for osteoarthritis on cartilage health. PET-MRI for analyzing relationships between the mechanical loading of tissue metabolic activity.

  • Jeffrey Ullman

    Jeffrey Ullman

    Stanford Warren Ascherman Professor of Engineering , Emeritus

    BioJeff Ullman is the Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Engineering
    (Emeritus) in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford and CEO
    of Gradiance Corp. He received the B.S. degree from Columbia
    University in 1963 and the PhD from Princeton in 1966. Prior to his
    appointment at Stanford in 1979, he was a member of the technical
    staff of Bell Laboratories from
    1966-1969, and on the faculty of Princeton University between
    1969 and 1979. From 1990-1994, he was chair of the Stanford Computer
    Science Department. Ullman was elected to the National Academy of
    Engineering in 1989, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in
    2012, and has held Guggenheim and Einstein Fellowships. He has
    received the Sigmod Contributions Award (1996), the ACM Karl V. Karlstrom
    Outstanding Educator Award (1998), the Knuth Prize (2000),
    the Sigmod E. F. Codd Innovations award (2006), the IEEE von
    Neumann medal (2010), and the NEC C&C Foundation Prize (2017).
    He is the author of 16 books, including books
    on database systems, compilers, automata theory, and algorithms.

  • Javier Urzay

    Javier Urzay

    Sr Research Engineer, Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHigh-speed, chemically reacting, multi-phase flow physics
    and their engineering applications to aeronautics and astronautics,
    including chemical propulsion and hypersonic aerothermodynamics
    of air and space flight systems.

  • Jeremy Utley

    Jeremy Utley

    Adjunct Professor

    BioJeremy leads the d.school's work with organizations as the Director of Executive Education. In this role, he advises professionals and organizations on how to imbed the tools of design thinking and cultivate an innovative organizational culture. He also teaches two celebrated courses -- d.leadership and LaunchPad -- advanced offerings focused on creating real-world impact with the tools of design. He is also the host of the d.school's "Masters of Creativity" series.

    Jeremy speaks and writes extensively on the history of invention, discovery, creativity, and innovation.

    Jeremy never expected to be a designer. On his 10th birthday, his father asked him what he wanted to be when he grew up. Jeremy replied,”I want to be one of the people who carry boxes with handles.” A little over a decade later, Jeremy became a briefcase-carrying management consultant focusing on economic development. Then, in 2008, the d.school derailed him completely. His time as a student and a fellow at the d.school showed him that “how” he worked was more important than “what” he did. Today, Jeremy is dedicated to helping others along the same path to becoming a designer. He helps people change their deeply-engrained behaviors and discover, as he did, that it is possible for them to make a difference. He does this through teaching as well as through growing alongside his students to become better in his own life and work every day.

    Jeremy is the Director of Executive Education at the d.school. He is a graduate of The University of Texas at Austin’s Red McComb’s School of Business (2005) and the Stanford University Graduate School of Business (2009).

  • Camille Utterback

    Camille Utterback

    Associate Professor of Art and Art History and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioCamille Utterback is an internationally acclaimed artist whose interactive installations and reactive sculptures engage participants in a dynamic process of kinesthetic discovery and play. Utterback’s work explores the aesthetic and experiential possibilities of linking computational systems to human movement and gesture in layered and often humorous ways. Her work focuses attention on the continued relevance and richness of the body in our increasingly mediated world.

    Her work has been exhibited at galleries, festivals, and museums internationally, including The Frist Center for Visual Arts, Nashville, TN; The Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA; ZERO1 The Art & Technology Network, San Jose, CA; The New Museum of Contemporary Art, The American Museum of the Moving Image, New York; The NTT InterCommunication Center, Tokyo; The Seoul Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Netherlands Institute for Media Art; The Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art; The Center for Contemporary Art, Kiev, Ukraine; and the Ars Electronica Center, Austria. Utterback’s work is in private and public collections including Hewlett Packard, Itaú Cultural Institute in São Paolo, Brazil, and La Caixa Foundation in Barcelona, Spain.

    Awards and honors include a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2009), a Transmediale International Media Art Festival Award (2005), a Rockefeller Foundation New Media Fellowship (2002) and a commission from the Whitney Museum for the CODeDOC project on their ArtPort website (2002). Utterback holds a US patent for a video tracking system she developed while working as a research fellow at New York University (2004). Her work has been featured in The New York Times (2010, 2009, 2003, 2002, 2001), Art in America (October, 2004), Wired Magazine (February 2004), ARTnews (2001) and many other publications. It is also included in Thames & Hudson’s World of Art – Digital Art book (2003) by Christiane Paul.

    Recent public commissions include works for the Liberty Mutual Group, the FOR-SITE Foundation, The Sacramento Airport, The City of San Jose, California, The City of Fontana, California, and the City of St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Other commissions include projects for The American Museum of Natural History in New York, The Pittsburgh Children’s Museum, The Manhattan Children’s Museum, Herman Miller, Shiseido Cosmetics, and other private corporations.

    Utterback is currently an Assistant Professor in the Art and Art History Department at Stanford University. She holds a BA in Art from Williams College, and a Masters degree from The Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. She currently lives and works in San Francisco.

  • Melissa Valentine

    Melissa Valentine

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMelissa Valentine is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Management Science and Engineering Department, and co-director of the Center for Work, Technology, and Organization (WTO).

    Prof Valentine's research focuses on understanding how new technologies change work and organizations. She conducts in-depth observational studies to develop new understanding about new forms of organizing. Her work makes contributions to understanding classic and longstanding challenges in designing groups and organizations (e.g., the role of hierarchy, how to implement change, team stability vs. flexibility) but also brings in deep knowledge of how the rise of information technology has made possible new and different team and organizational forms. Her most recent study examined how the deployment of new algorithms changed the organizational structure of a retail tech company.

    Prof. Valentine has won awards for both research and teaching. She and collaborators won a Best Paper Award at the CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and the Outstanding Paper with Practical Implications award from the Organizational Behavior division of the Academy of Management. In 2013, she won the Organization Science/INFORMS dissertation proposal competition and received her PhD from Harvard University.

  • Gregory Valiant

    Gregory Valiant

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary research interests lie at the intersection of algorithms, learning, applied probability, and statistics. I am particularly interested in understanding the algorithmic and information theoretic possibilities and limitations for many fundamental information extraction tasks that underly real-world machine learning and data-centric applications.

  • Benjamin Van Roy

    Benjamin Van Roy

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, of Management Science and Engineering

    BioBenjamin Van Roy is a Professor at Stanford University, where he has served on the faculty since 1998. His research focuses on understanding how an agent interacting with a poorly understood environment can learn over time to make effective decisions. He is interested in the design of efficient reinforcement learning algorithms, understanding what is possible or impossible in this domain, and applying the technology toward the benefit of society. Beyond academia, he leads a DeepMind Research team in Mountain View, and has also led research programs at Unica (acquired by IBM), Enuvis (acquired by SiRF), and Morgan Stanley.

    He is a Fellow of INFORMS and IEEE and has served on the editorial boards of Machine Learning, Mathematics of Operations Research, for which he co-edits the Learning Theory Area, Operations Research, for which he edited the Financial Engineering Area, and the INFORMS Journal on Optimization.

    He received the SB in Computer Science and Engineering and the SM and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, all from MIT. He has been a recipient of the MIT George C. Newton Undergraduate Laboratory Project Award, the MIT Morris J. Levin Memorial Master's Thesis Award, the MIT George M. Sprowls Doctoral Dissertation Award, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Stanford Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the Management Science and Engineering Department's Graduate Teaching Award. He has held visiting positions as the Wolfgang and Helga Gaul Visiting Professor at the University of Karlsruhe, the Chin Sophonpanich Foundation Professor and the InTouch Professor at Chulalongkorn University, a Visiting Professor at the National University of Singapore, and a Visiting Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen.

  • Tiziana Vanorio

    Tiziana Vanorio

    Senior Associate Dean of Educational Affairs, Associate Professor of Geological Sciences and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRock Physics, Fossil Energy Exploration, Volcanic and Geothermal Environments and Microseismicity

  • Andras Vasy

    Andras Vasy

    Robert Grimmett Professor of Mathematics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research concentrates on topics in two broad areas of applications of microlocal analysis in which, partly with collaborators, I introduced new ideas in recent years: non-elliptic linear and non-linear partial differential equations (PDE), typically concerning wave propagation or other related phenomena, and inverse problems for X-ray type transforms along geodesics and related problems for determining the metric tensor from boundary measurements.

  • Ross Daniel Venook

    Ross Daniel Venook

    Senior Lecturer of Bioengineering

    BioRoss is a Senior Lecturer in the Bioengineering department and he directs Engineering at the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign.

    Ross co-leads three undergraduate courses at Stanford—an instrumentation lab (BIOE123) and an open-ended capstone design lab sequence (BIOE141A/B)—and he supports other courses and runs hands-on workshops in the areas of prototyping and systems engineering related to medical device innovation. He enjoys the unique challenges and constraints offered by biomedical engineering projects, and he delights in the opportunity for collaborative learning in a problem-solving environment.

    An Electrical Engineer by training (Stanford BS, MS, PhD), Ross’ graduate work focused on building and applying new types of MRI hardware for interventional and device-related uses. Following a Biodesign Innovation fellowship, Ross helped to start the MRI safety program at Boston Scientific Neuromodulation, where he continues working across the MRI safety community to create and improve international standards and to enable safe MRI access for patients with implanted medical devices.

  • Jelena Vuckovic

    Jelena Vuckovic

    Jensen Huang Professor of Global Leadership and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsphotonics, quantum technologies, quantum optics, inverse design

  • Ken Waldron

    Ken Waldron

    Professor (Research) of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioKenneth J. Waldron is Professor of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering at UTS. He is also Professor Emeritus from the Design Group in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Stanford University. He holds bachelors and masters degrees from the University of Sydney, and PhD from Stanford. He works in machine design, and design methodology with a particular focus on robotic and mechatronic systems.

  • James Wall

    James Wall

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth Technology Innovation

  • Todd Walter

    Todd Walter

    Professor (Research) of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHigh integrity satellite navigation for guiding aircraft, including satellite based augmentation systems (SBAS) and advanced receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (ARAIM).

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModels and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes. Image systems simulations of optics and sensors and image processing. Data and computation management for reproducible research.

  • Adam Wang

    Adam Wang

    Assistant Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioMy group develops technologies for advanced x-ray and CT imaging, including artificial intelligence for CT acquisition, reconstruction, and image processing; novel system and detector designs; spectral imaging; model-based image reconstruction; and radiation transport methods. I am also the Director of the Zeego Lab and the Tabletop X-Ray Lab.

    I completed my PhD in Electrical Engineering at Stanford under the supervision of Dr. Norbert Pelc, developing strategies for maximizing the information content of dual energy CT and photon counting detectors. I then pursued a postdoc at Johns Hopkins with Dr. Jeff Siewerdsen in Biomedical Engineering, developing reconstruction and registration methods for x-ray based image-guided surgery. Prior to returning to Stanford in 2018, I was a Senior Scientist at Varian Medical Systems, developing x-ray/CT methods for image-guided radiation therapy.

  • Bo Wang

    Bo Wang

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests:
    (1) Systems biology of whole-body regeneration
    (2) Cell type evolution through the lens of single-cell multiomic sequencing analysis
    (3) Quantitative biology of brain regeneration
    (4) Regeneration of animal-algal photosymbiotic systems

  • Hai Wang

    Hai Wang

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioHai Wang is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. His interests are in renewable energy conversion, catalysis and combustion. His current research focuses on theories and applications of nanoparticles and nanostructures for rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, combustion simulations and nanocatalysis. He is the author and coauthor of numerous papers in scholarly journals, including "Mesoporous titania films prepared by flame stabilized on a rotating surface-Application in dye sensitized solar cells" in Journal of Physical Chemistry C, “A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames” in Combustion and Flame, “Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. I. Theory applicable to the free-molecule regime” in Physical Review E, “A new mechanism for the formation of meteoritic kerogen-like material” in Science, “Gas-nanoparticle scattering: A molecular view of momentum accommodation function” in Physical Review Letters, and “Formation of nascent soot and other condensed-phase materials in flames” in Proceedings of the Combustion Institute. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, a highly influential energy journal published by Elsevier with an impact factor of 25.2 (2017).

  • Paul  J. Wang, MD

    Paul J. Wang, MD

    John R. and Ai Giak L. Singleton Director, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang's research centers on the development of innovative approaches to the treatment of arrhythmias, including more effective catheter ablation techniques, more reliable implantable devices, and less invasive treatments. Dr. Wang's clinical research interests include atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, syncope, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Wang has active collaborations with Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Departments at Stanford.

  • Shan X. Wang

    Shan X. Wang

    Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsShan Wang was named the Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering in 2018. He directs the Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology and is a leading expert in biosensors, information storage and spintronics. His research and inventions span across a variety of areas including magnetic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cancer biomarkers, magnetic nanoparticles, magnetic sensors, magnetoresistive random access memory, and magnetic integrated inductors.

  • Robert Waymouth

    Robert Waymouth

    Robert Eckles Swain Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering
    On Leave from 01/01/2022 To 12/31/2022

    BioRobert Eckles Swain Professor in Chemistry Robert Waymouth investigates new catalytic strategies to create useful new molecules, including bioactive polymers, synthetic fuels, and sustainable plastics. In one such breakthrough, Professor Waymouth and Professor Wender developed a new class of gene delivery agents.

    Born in 1960 in Warner Robins, Georgia, Robert Waymouth studied chemistry and mathematics at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia (B.S. and B.A., respectively, both summa cum laude, 1982). He developed an interest in synthetic and mechanistic organometallic chemistry during his doctoral studies in chemistry at the California Institute of Technology under Professor R.H. Grubbs (Ph.D., 1987). His postdoctoral research with Professor Piero Pino at the Institut fur Polymere, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, focused on catalytic hydrogenation with chiral metallocene catalysts. He joined the Stanford University faculty as assistant professor in 1988, becoming full professor in 1997 and in 2000 the Robert Eckles Swain Professor of Chemistry.

    Today, the Waymouth Group applies mechanistic principles to develop new concepts in catalysis, with particular focus on the development of organometallic and organic catalysts for the synthesis of complex macromolecular architectures. In organometallic catalysis, the group devised a highly selective alcohol oxidation catalyst that selectively oxidizes unprotected polyols and carbohydrates to alpha-hyroxyketones. In collaboration with Dr. James Hedrick of IBM, we have developed a platform of highly active organic catalysts and continuous flow reactors that provide access to polymer architectures that are difficult to access by conventional approaches.

    The Waymouth group has devised selective organocatalytic strategies for the synthesis of functional degradable polymers and oligomers that function as "molecular transporters" to deliver genes, drugs and probes into cells and live animals. These advances led to the joint discovery with the Wender group of a general, safe, and remarkably effective concept for RNA delivery based on a new class of synthetic cationic materials, Charge-Altering Releasable Transporters (CARTs). This technology has been shown to be effective for mRNA based cancer vaccines.

  • Itschak Weissman

    Itschak Weissman

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioTsachy's research focuses on Information Theory, Data Compression and Communications, Statistical Signal Processing, Machine Learning, the interplay between them, and their applications, with recent focus on applications to genomic data compression and processing. He is inventor of several patents and involved in several companies as member of the technical board. IEEE fellow, he serves on the board of governors of the information theory society as well as the editorial boards of the Transactions on Information Theory and Foundations and Trends in Communications and Information Theory. He is founding Director of the Stanford Compression Forum.

  • Gordon Wetzstein

    Gordon Wetzstein

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGordon Wetzstein is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science at Stanford University. He is the leader of the Stanford Computational Imaging Lab and a faculty co-director of the Stanford Center for Image Systems Engineering. At the intersection of computer graphics and vision, computational optics, and applied vision science, Prof. Wetzstein's research has a wide range of applications in next-generation imaging, display, wearable computing, and microscopy systems. Prior to joining Stanford in 2014, Prof. Wetzstein was a Research Scientist at MIT, he received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of British Columbia in 2011 and graduated with Honors from the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany before that. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, an ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), an SPIE Early Career Achievement Award, a Terman Fellowship, an Okawa Research Grant, the Electronic Imaging Scientist of the Year 2017 Award, an Alain Fournier Ph.D. Dissertation Award, and a Laval Virtual Award as well as Best Paper and Demo Awards at ICCP 2011, 2014, and 2016 and at ICIP 2016.

  • John Weyant

    John Weyant

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioJohn P. Weyant is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and Director of the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy and an an affiliated faculty member of the Stanford School of Earth, Environment and Energy Sciences, the Woods Institute for the Environment, and the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. His current research focuses on analysis of multi-sector, multi-region coupled human and earth systems dynamics, global change systems analysis, energy technology assessment, and models for strategic planning.

    Weyant was a founder and serves as chairman of the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC), a fourteen-year old collaboration among over 60 member institutions from around the world. He has been an active adviser to the United Nations, the European Commission, U.S.Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency. In California, he has been and adviser to the California Air Resources, the California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission..

    Weyant was awarded the US Association for Energy Economics’ 2008 Adelmann-Frankel award for unique and innovative contributions to the field of energy economics and the award for outstanding lifetime contributions to the Profession for 2017 from the International Association for Energy Economics, and a Life Time Achievement award from the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium in 2018. Weyant was honored in 2007 as a major contributor to the Nobel Peace prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and in 2008 by Chairman Mary Nichols for contributions to the to the California Air Resources Board's Economic and Technology Advancement Advisory Committee on AB 32.

    Fields of Specialization:
    Energy/Environmental Policy Analysis, Strategic Planning

    Interests:
    Overall goal is to accelerate the use of systems models at state, country, and global scales, aiming to provide the best available information and insights to government and private-sector decision makers. Specific areas include energy, climate change, and sustainable development policy, including emerging technologies and market design alternatives. Draws on concepts and techniques from science and engineering fundamentals (e.g., thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, materials science, and electrical power systems), operations research, economics, finance, and decision theory.

  • Jennifer Widom

    Jennifer Widom

    Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering, Fletcher Jones Professor of Computer Science and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioJennifer Widom is the Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering and the Fletcher Jones Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She served as Computer Science Department Chair from 2009-2014 and School of Engineering Senior Associate Dean from 2014-2016. Jennifer received her Bachelor's degree from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music in 1982 and her Computer Science Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1987. She was a Research Staff Member at the IBM Almaden Research Center before joining the Stanford faculty in 1993. Her research interests span many aspects of nontraditional data management. She is an ACM Fellow and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences; she received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2000, the ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award in 2007, the ACM-W Athena Lecturer Award in 2015, and the EPFL-WISH Foundation Erna Hamburger Prize in 2018.

  • Bernard Widrow

    Bernard Widrow

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Widrow's research focuses on adaptive signal processing, adaptive control systems, adaptive neural networks, human memory, and human-like memory for computers. Applications include signal processing, prediction, noise cancelling, adaptive arrays, control systems, and pattern recognition. Recent work is about human learning at the synaptic level.

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Keith Winstein

    Keith Winstein

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Law

    BioKeith Winstein is an assistant professor of computer science and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering at Stanford University. His research group creates new kinds of networked systems by rethinking abstractions around communication, compression, and computing. Some of his research has found broader use, including the Mosh tool, the Puffer video-streaming site, the Lepton compression tool, the Mahimahi network emulators, the gg lambda-computing framework, and the use of a temporal reordering threshold to detect packet loss. His work has received the Sloan Research Fellowship, the Usenix NSDI Community Award (2020, 2017), the Applied Networking Research Prize (2021, 2014), the Usenix ATC Best Paper Award, a Google Faculty Research Award (2017, 2015), a Facebook Faculty Award, the ACM SIGCOMM Doctoral Dissertation Award, and a Sprowls award for best doctoral thesis in computer science at MIT. Winstein previously served as a staff reporter at The Wall Street Journal, was one of the story consultants for HBO’s “Silicon Valley,” and worked at Ksplice, a startup company (now part of Oracle) where he was the vice president of product management and business development and also cleaned the bathroom. He did his undergraduate and graduate work at MIT.

  • Christina R Wodtke

    Christina R Wodtke

    Lecturer

    BioChristina Wodtke is an author, speaker, and lecturer at Stanford with insight into human innovation and high-performing teams. Her resume includes re-design and initial product offerings with LinkedIn, MySpace, Zynga, Yahoo! and others, as well as founding three startups, an online design magazine called Boxes and Arrows, and co-founding the Information Architecture Institute.

    Christina uses the power of story to connect with audiences and readers through her worldwide speaking engagements and her Amazon category-bestselling books. Her bestselling book, Radical Focus, tackles the OKR movement and startup culture with an eye to getting the right things done. Her other books include The Team that Managed Itself, Information Architecture: Blueprints for the Web and Pencil Me In (on visual thinking for the workplace.) Christina’s work is personable, insightful, knowledgeable, and engaging. Find out more information (and get your Focus worksheet) at cwodtke.com.

  • H.-S. Philip Wong

    H.-S. Philip Wong

    Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioH.-S. Philip Wong is the Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford University as Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2004. From 1988 to 2004, he was with the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. From 2018 to 2020, he was on leave from Stanford and was the Vice President of Corporate Research at TSMC, the largest semiconductor foundry in the world, and since 2020 remains the Chief Scientist of TSMC in a consulting, advisory role.

    He is a Fellow of the IEEE and received the IEEE Electron Devices Society J.J. Ebers Award, the society’s highest honor to recognize outstanding technical contributions to the field of electron devices that have made a lasting impact.

    He is the founding Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance – an industrial affiliate program focused on building systems, the faculty director of the Stanford Non-Volatile Memory Technology Research Initiative (NMTRI), and the faculty director of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility – a shared facility for device fabrication on the Stanford campus that serves academic, industrial, and governmental researchers across the U.S. and around the globe, sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation.

  • S Simon Wong

    S Simon Wong

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research focuses on

    Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) and Integration with CMOS

    Energy Efficient Approximate Computing for Machine Learning

  • Wing Hung Wong

    Wing Hung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor of Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Bruce A. Wooley

    Bruce A. Wooley

    The Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioBruce Wooley is the Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received a Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1970, and from 1970 to 1984 he was a member of the research staff at Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, NJ. He joined the faculty at Stanford in 1984. At Stanford he has served as the Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering, the Senior Associate Dean of Engineering and the Director of the Integrated Circuits Laboratory. His research is in the field of integrated circuit design, where his interests include low-power mixed-signal circuit design, oversampling analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, circuit design techniques for video and image data acquisition, high-speed embedded memory, high-performance packaging and testing, and circuits for wireless and wireline communications.
    Prof. Wooley is a Fellow of the IEEE and a past President of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society. He has served as the Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits and as the Chairman of both the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) and the Symposium on VLSI Circuits. Awards he has received include the University Medal from the University of California, Berkeley, the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits Best Paper Award, the Outstanding Alumnus Award from the EECS Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and the IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits.

  • Jiajun Wu

    Jiajun Wu

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioJiajun Wu is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, working on computer vision, machine learning, and computational cognitive science. Before joining Stanford, he was a Visiting Faculty Researcher at Google Research. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Wu's research has been recognized through the ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award Honorable Mention, the AAAI/ACM SIGAI Doctoral Dissertation Award, the MIT George M. Sprowls PhD Thesis Award in Artificial Intelligence and Decision-Making, the 2020 Samsung AI Researcher of the Year, the IROS Best Paper Award on Cognitive Robotics, and faculty research awards and graduate fellowships from Samsung, Amazon, Facebook, Nvidia, and Adobe.

  • Lei Xing

    Lei Xing

    Jacob Haimson and Sarah S. Donaldson Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsartificial intelligence in medicine, medical imaging, Image-guided intervention, molecular imaging, biology guided radiation therapy (BGRT), treatment plan optimization

  • Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental Quantum Optics, Semiconductor Physics, Quantum Information

  • Daniel Yamins

    Daniel Yamins

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab's research lies at intersection of neuroscience, artificial intelligence, psychology and large-scale data analysis. It is founded on two mutually reinforcing hypotheses:

    H1. By studying how the brain solves computational challenges, we can learn to build better artificial intelligence algorithms.

    H2. Through improving artificial intelligence algorithms, we'll discover better models of how the brain works.

    We investigate these hypotheses using techniques from computational modeling and artificial intelligence, high-throughput neurophysiology, functional brain imaging, behavioral psychophysics, and large-scale data analysis.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research seeks to understand how microenvironmental cues regulate stem cell fate, and to develop novel biomaterials and stem cell-based therapeutics for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our work spans from fundamental science, technology development, to translational research.We are particularly interested in developing better therapies for treating musculoskeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

  • Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsYang’ lab's research interests are in the areas of bio-inspired biomaterials, medical devices, and 3D printing approaches for re-creating a suitable microenvironment for cell growth and tissue regeneration for musculoskeletal disease diagnosis and treatment, including multiple tissue healing such as rotator cuff injury, orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, and orthopedic traumas such as massive bone and muscle injuries.

  • Yinyu Ye

    Yinyu Ye

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests include Continuous and Discrete Optimization, Algorithm Development and Analyses, Algorithmic Game/Market Theory and Mechanism-Design, Markov Decision Process and Reinforcement Learning, Dynamic/Online Optimization and Resource Allocation, and Stochastic and Robust Decision Making. These areas have been the unique and core disciplines of MS&E, and extended to new application areas in AI, Machine Learning, Data Science, and Business Analytics.

  • Serena Yeung

    Serena Yeung

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Serena Yeung is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research focus is on developing artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to enable new capabilities in biomedicine and healthcare. She has extensive expertise in deep learning and computer vision, and has developed computer vision algorithms for analyzing diverse types of visual data ranging from video capture of human behavior, to medical images and cell microscopy images.

    Dr. Yeung leads the Medical AI and Computer Vision Lab at Stanford. She is affiliated with the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Clinical Excellence Research Center, the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging, the Center for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Bio-X. She also serves on the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Artificial Intelligence.

  • Paul Yock, MD

    Paul Yock, MD

    Martha Meier Weiland Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Bioengineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth technology innovation using the Biodesign process: a systematic approach to the design of biomedical technologies based on detailed clinical and economic needs characterization. New approaches for interdisciplinary training of health technology innovators, including processes for identifying value opportunities in creating new technology-based approaches to health care.

  • Matei Zaharia

    Matei Zaharia

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioHomepage: https://cs.stanford.edu/~matei/

  • Howard Zebker

    Howard Zebker

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My students and I study the surfaces of Earth and planets using radar remote sensing methods. Our specialization is interferometric radar, or InSAR. InSAR is a technique to measure mm-scale surface deformation at fine resolution over wide areas, and much of our work follows from applying this technique to the study of earthquakes, volcanoes, and human-induced subsidence. We also address global environmental problems by tracking the movement of ice in the polar regions. whose ice mass balance affects sea level rise and global climate. We participate in NASA space missions such as Cassini, in which we now are examining the largest moon of Saturn, Titan, to try and deduce its composition and evolution. Our work includes experimental observation and modeling the measurements to best understand processes affecting the Earth and solar system. We use data acquired by spaceborne satellites and by large, ground-based radar telescopes to support our research.

    Teaching
    I teach courses related to remote sensing methods and applications, and how these methods can be used to study the world around us. At the undergraduate level, these include introductory remote sensing uses of the full electromagnetic spectrum to characterize Earth and planetary surfaces and atmospheres, and methods of digital image processing. I also teach a freshman and sophomore seminar course on natural hazards. At the graduate level, the courses are more specialized, including the math and physics of two-dimensional imaging systems, plus detailed ourses on imaging radar systems for geophysical applications.

    Professional Activities
    InSAR Review Board, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (2006-present); editorial board, IEEE Proceedings (2005-present); NRC Earth Science and Applications from Space Panel on Solid Earth Hazards, Resources, and Dynamics (2005-present); Chair, Western North America InSAR (WInSAR) Consortium (2004-06); organizing committee, NASA/NSF/USGS InSAR working group; International Union of Radioscience (URSI) Board of Experts for Medal Evaluations (2004-05); National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo Observatory, Visiting Committee, (2002-04; chair, 2003-04); NASA Alaska SAR Facility users working group (2000-present); associate editor, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1998-present); fellow, IEEE (1998)

  • Renee Zhao

    Renee Zhao

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioRuike Renee Zhao is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University where she directs the Soft Intelligent Materials Laboratory. Renee received her BS degree from Xi'an Jiaotong University in 2012, and her MS and PhD degrees from Brown University in 2014 and 2016, respectively. She was a postdoc associate at MIT during 2016-2018 prior to her appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at The Ohio State University from 2018 to 2021.
    Renee’s research concerns the development of stimuli-responsive soft composites for multifunctional robotic systems with integrated shape-changing, assembling, sensing, and navigation. By combining mechanics, polymer engineering, and advanced material manufacturing techniques, the functional soft composites enable applications in soft robotics, miniaturized biomedical devices, flexible electronics, deployable and morphing structures.
    Renee is a recipient of the 2022 ASME Henry Hess Early Career Publication Award, 2022 ASME Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal, 2021 ASME Applied Mechanics Division Journal of Applied Mechanics Award, 2020 NSF Career Award, and 2018 ASME Applied Mechanics Division Haythornthwaite Research Initiation Award.

  • Xiaolin Zheng

    Xiaolin Zheng

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

  • Roseanna N. Zia

    Roseanna N. Zia

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab unifies mesoscale physics and chemistry with cellular-level biology through novel theoretical modeling and large-scale computational simulations. We work in four areas: 1) constructing micro-continuum theory of complex fluids; 2) mechanistically explaining non-equilibrium phase transitions in colloidal systems; 3) modeling confined and large-scale hydrodynamically-interacting colloidal suspensions; and 4) modeling the physics of living cells.

  • James Zou

    James Zou

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group works on both foundations of statistical machine learning and applications in biomedicine and healthcare. We develop new technologies that make ML more accountable to humans, more reliable/robust and reveals core scientific insights.

    We want our ML to be impactful and beneficial, and as such, we are deeply motivated by transformative applications in biotech and health. We collaborate with and advise many academic and industry groups.

  • Adam Zsarnoczay

    Adam Zsarnoczay

    Research Engineer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdam's research concerns natural hazards engineering in general, focusing on probabilistic hazard assessment; calibration and development of numerical models to estimate structural response, damage, and losses; and large-scale simulations to describe the impact of natural disasters on an urban environment.