School of Engineering


Showing 1-100 of 757 Results

  • James L. Adams

    James L. Adams

    Professor of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management and of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have for some time been working on two books. The working title for one is Making, Fixing, and Tinkering, and it concerns the benefits of working with the hands. The other has a working title of Homo Demi Sapiens, and is about the balance of creativity and control in very large groups (societies, religions, etc.). I am also revising a book entitled The Building of an Engineer, which I wrote for my aging mother and self-published. It is somewhat autobiographical, and although it is available on Amazon, I do not consider it quite ready for public reading.

  • Maneesh Agrawala

    Maneesh Agrawala

    Forest Baskett Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComputer Graphics, Human Computer Interaction and Visualization.

  • Alex Aiken

    Alex Aiken

    Alcatel-Lucent Professor in Communications and Networking and Professor of Particle Physics and Astrophysics and of Photon Science

    BioAiken's research focuses on developing techniques for the construction of reliable software systems. His interests include both static and dynamic methods of analyzing programs, and span both detecting errors and verifying the absence of errors in software. Most of his research combines a theoretical component (for example, proving the soundness of an analysis technique) and a practical component, which often involves the implementation and measurement of advanced program analysis algorithms. Finally, his research also extends to the design of new programming languages and programming techniques in which it is easier to write software that can be checked for a wide variety of errors.

  • Juan J. Alonso

    Juan J. Alonso

    Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    BioProf. Alonso is the founder and director of the Aerospace Design Laboratory (ADL) where he specializes in the development of high-fidelity computational design methodologies to enable the creation of realizable and efficient aerospace systems. Prof. Alonso’s research involves a large number of different manned and unmanned applications including transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft, helicopters, turbomachinery, and launch and re-entry vehicles. He is the author of over 200 technical publications on the topics of computational aircraft and spacecraft design, multi-disciplinary optimization, fundamental numerical methods, and high-performance parallel computing. Prof. Alonso is keenly interested in the development of an advanced curriculum for the training of future engineers and scientists and has participated actively in course-development activities in both the Aeronautics & Astronautics Department (particularly in the development of coursework for aircraft design, sustainable aviation, and UAS design and operation) and for the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME) at Stanford University. He was a member of the team that currently holds the world speed record for human powered vehicles over water. A student team led by Prof. Alonso also holds the altitude record for an unmanned electric vehicle under 5 lbs of mass.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Thomas P. Andriacchi

    Thomas P. Andriacchi

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Orthopaedic Surgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Andriacchi's research focuses on the biomechanics of human locomotion and applications to medical devices, sports injury, osteoarthritis, the anterior cruciate ligament and low cost prosthetic limbs

  • Eric Andrew Appel

    Eric Andrew Appel

    Assistant Professor of Material Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe underlying theme of the Appel Lab at Stanford University integrates concepts and approaches from supramolecular chemistry, natural/synthetic materials, and biology. We aim to develop supramolecular biomaterials that exploit a diverse design toolbox and take advantage of the beautiful synergism between physical properties, aesthetics, and low energy consumption typical of natural systems. Our vision is to use these materials to solve fundamental biological questions and to engineer advanced healthcare solutions.

  • Amin Arbabian

    Amin Arbabian

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group's research covers RF circuits and system design for (1) biomedical, (2) sensing, and (3) Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

  • Itai Ashlagi

    Itai Ashlagi

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioItai Ashlagi is an Assistant Professor at the Management Science & Engineering Department.
    He is interested in game theory and the design and analysis of marketplaces. He is especially interested in matching markets, for which he developed mechanisms using tools from operations/cs and economics. His work influenced the practice of Kidney exchange, for which he has become a Franz Edelman Laureate. Ashlagi received his PhD in operations research from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.
    Before coming to Stanford he was an assistant professor of Operations Management at Sloan, MIT and prior to that a postdoctoral researcher at HBS. He is the recipient of the outstanding paper award in the ACM conference of Electronic Commerce 2009. His research is supported by the NSF including an NSF-CAREER award.

  • Peter Bailis

    Peter Bailis

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioPeter Bailis is an assistant professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. Peter's research in the Future Data Systems group focuses on the design and implementation of next-generation, post-database data-intensive systems. His work spans large-scale data management, distributed protocol design, and architectures for high-volume complex decision support. He is the recipient of an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, a Berkeley Fellowship for Graduate Study, best-of-conference citations for research appearing in both SIGMOD and VLDB, and the CRA Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award. He received a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 2015 and an A.B. from Harvard College in 2011, both in Computer Science.

  • Jack Baker

    Jack Baker

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioJack Baker's research focuses on the use of probabilistic and statistical tools for modeling of extreme loads on structures. He has investigated probabilistic modeling of seismic hazards, improved characterization of earthquake ground motions, dynamic analysis of structures, prediction of the spatial extent of soil failures from earthquakes, and tools for modeling loads on spatially distributed infrastructure systems. Dr. Baker joined Stanford from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), where he was a visiting researcher in the Department of Structural Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from Stanford University, where he also earned M.S. degrees in Statistics and Structural Engineering. He has industry experience in seismic hazard assessment, ground motion selection, construction management, and modeling of catastrophe losses for insurance companies.

  • Nicholas Bambos

    Nicholas Bambos

    Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioNick Bambos is a Professor at Stanford University, having a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Management Science & Engineering. He heads the Network Architecture and Performance Engineering research group at Stanford, conducting research in wireless network architectures, the Internet infrastructure, packet switching, network management and information service engineering, engaged in various projects of his Network Architecture Laboratory (NetLab). His current technology research interests include high-performance networking, autonomic computing, and service engineering. His methodological interests are in network control, online task scheduling, queueing systems and stochastic processing networks.

    He has graduated over 20 Ph.D. students, who are now at leadership positions in academia (Stanford, CalTech, Michigan, GaTech, NYU, UBC, etc.) and the information technology industry (Cisco, Broadcom, IBM Labs, Qualcomm, Nokia, MITRE, Sun Labs, ST Micro, Intel, Samsung, TI, etc.) or have become successful entrepreneurs. From 1999 to 2005 he served as the director of the Stanford Networking Research Center, a major partnership/consortium between Stanford and information technology industries, involving tens of corporate members, faculty and doctoral students. He is now heading a new research initiative at Stanford on Networked Information Service Engineering.

    He is on the Editorial Boards of several research journals and serves on various international technical committees and review panels for networking research and information technologies. He has been serving on the boards of various start-up companies in the Silicon Valley, consults on high technology development and management matters, and has served as lead expert witness in high-profile patent litigation cases in networking and computing.

  • Zhenan Bao

    Zhenan Bao

    K. K. Lee Professor in the School of Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry

    BioZhenan Bao joined Stanford University in 2004. She is currently a K.K. Lee Professor in Chemical Engineering, and with courtesy appointments in Chemistry and Material Science and Engineering. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Inventors. She founded the Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR) and is the current faculty director. She is also an affiliated faculty member of Precourt Institute, Woods Institute, ChEM-H and Bio-X. Professor Bao received her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from The University of Chicago in 1995 and joined the Materials Research Department of Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. She became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in 2001. Professor Bao currently has more than 400 refereed publications and more than 60 US patents. She served as a member of Executive Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society and Executive Committee Member for the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering division of the American Chemical Society. She was an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Chemical Science, Polymer Reviews and Synthetic Metals. She serves on the international advisory board for Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, ACS Nano, Accounts of Chemical Reviews, Advanced Functional Materials, Chemistry of Materials, Chemical Communications, Journal of American Chemical Society, Nature Asian Materials, Materials Horizon and Materials Today. She is one of the Founders and currently sits on the Board of Directors of C3 Nano Co. and PyrAmes, bot are silicon valley venture funded companies. She is Fellow of AAAS, ACS, MRS, SPIE, ACS POLY and ACS PMSE. She was a recipient of the L'Oreal UNESCO Women in Science Award in 2017. She was awarded the ACS Applied Polymer Science Award in 2017, ACS Creative Polymer Chemistry Award in 2013 ACS Cope Scholar Award in 2011, and was selected by Phoenix TV, China as 2010 Most influential Chinese in the World-Science and Technology Category. She is a recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Beilby Medal and Prize in 2009, IUPAC Creativity in Applied Polymer Science Prize in 2008, American Chemical Society Team Innovation Award 2001, R&D 100 Award, and R&D Magazine Editors Choice Best of the Best new technology for 2001. She has been selected in 2002 by the American Chemical Society Women Chemists Committee as one of the twelve Outstanding Young Woman Scientist who is expected to make a substantial impact in chemistry during this century. She is also selected by MIT Technology Review magazine in 2003 as one of the top 100 young innovators for this century. She has been selected as one of the recipients of Stanford Terman Fellow and has been appointed as the Robert Noyce Faculty Scholar, Finmeccanica Faculty Scholar and David Filo and Jerry Yang Faculty Scholar.

  • Ronita Bardhan

    Ronita Bardhan

    Visiting Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Ronita Bardhan is Assistant Professor at the Center for Urban Science and Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India and Associate Faculty at the Interdisciplinary Programme (IDP) in Climate Studies in the same institute. She is currently Shimizu Visiting Professor at Stanford University, USA. Ronita is also a Charles Wallace India Trust Fellow at Cambridge University, UK. Dr. Bardhan is an architect and urban planner by training, with a PhD in Urban Engineering as a Monbukagakusho (MEXT)Scholar from The University of Tokyo, Japan. Her work is centred around sustainable urban planning for low-income settlements in Indian megacities. In short time, she was able to demonstrate the need for a data-driven design pathway for low-income settlements like slums in Mumbai to facilitate a better quality of life among the women and children. She engages deeply in mixed-method research and believes in the full integration of various stakeholders in the policy-making process for sustainable low-income housing. Her research mostly evolves from the practical needs of the community and is interpreted through the lenses of the state-of- the-art urban modelling toolkits. The transdisciplinary nature of her research transverses across the improvement of indoor air quality in slums and tenement housing to the assessment of energy security in such resource-constrained settlements. She is the recipient of The Building Energy Efficiency Higher & Advanced Network (BHAVAN) Fellowship 2016-2017 in recognition of her work in building energy efficiency for low-income communities and was awarded the Young Researcher Award 2012 for her innovative contribution in the field of Sustainable Urban Regeneration in Japan.

  • Stephen R. Barley

    Stephen R. Barley

    Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTechnology's role in occupational and organizational change. Science and innovation in industrial settings. Organizational and occupational culture. Corporate power. Social network theory. Macro-organizational behavior.

  • David Barnett

    David Barnett

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioDislocations in Elastic Solids; Bulk, Surface and Interfacial Waves in Anisotropic Elastic Media; Mechanics of Piezoelectric and Piezomagnetic Materials, Modeling of transport in fuel cell materials and of AFM usage to characterize charge distributions and impedance of fuel cell media. He is the author of over 125 technical articles concerned with dislocations and waves in anisotropic elastic and piezoelectric media.

  • Clark Barrett

    Clark Barrett

    Associate Professor (Research) of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn an increasingly automated and networked world, a pressing challenge is ensuring the security and dependability of hardware and software systems. Formal techniques (based on mathematical logic) are among the most powerful tools available for finding difficult bugs and ensuring correctness. My research vision is to develop general-purpose, automated, and scalable formal techniques, with the aim of providing a sound and practical foundation for reliable computer systems.

  • Annelise E. Barron

    Annelise E. Barron

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiophysical mechanisms of host defense peptides (a.k.a. antimicrobial peptides) and their peptoid mimics; also, molecular and cellular biophysics of human innate immune responses.

  • Mohsen Bayati

    Mohsen Bayati

    Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research areas of interest include:

    1) Probabilistic and statistical models for decision making with large-scale and complex data (and applications in healthcare).

    2) Graphical models and message-passing algorithms.

  • David Beach

    David Beach

    Professor (Teaching) of Mechanical Engineering

    BioBeach teaches courses in the areas of design and manufacturing. Beach and Craig Milroy co-direct the Product Realization Laboratory which provides 1700 students annually with hands on experiences in product definition, conceptual design, detail design, and prototype creation. The PRL offers courses, mentors and tools in support of integrated designing and making. Pedagogically, Beach believes that creation of experience from which students (and teams of students) can interpret and internalize their own conclusions provides an excellent complement to content based teaching. His goal is to add strength in tacit knowledge which derives from the hands-on synthesis of design, prototype building, presentation and criticism.. The resulting judgment and instinct regarding materials, devices, materials transformation processes, and design process complement classical analytical engineering education to create superior engineers.

  • Gill Bejerano

    Gill Bejerano

    Associate Professor of Developmental Biology, of Computer Science and of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bejerano, co-discoverer of ultraconserved elements, studies the Human Genome. His research focuses on genome sequence and function in both humans and related primate, mammalian and vertebrate species. He is deeply interested in mapping both coding and non-coding genome sequence variation to phenotype differences, and in extracting specific genetic insights from high throughput sequencing measurements, in the contexts of development and developmental abnormalities.

  • Stacey Bent

    Stacey Bent

    Jagdeep and Roshni Singh Professor in the School of Engineering, Senior Associate Dean for Faculty & Academic Affairs, Senior Fellow at Precourt and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science & Eng, of Electrical Eng and of Chemistry

    BioThe research in the Bent laboratory is focused on understanding and controlling surface and interfacial chemistry and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in semiconductor processing, micro- and nano-electronics, nanotechnology, and sustainable and renewable energy. Much of the research aims to develop a molecular-level understanding in these systems, and hence the group uses of a variety of molecular probes. Systems currently under study in the group include functionalization of semiconductor surfaces, mechanisms and control of atomic layer deposition, molecular layer deposition, nanoscale materials for light absorption, interface engineering in photovoltaics, catalyst and electrocatalyst deposition.

  • Michael Bernstein

    Michael Bernstein

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioMichael Bernstein combines computation with crowds, creating systems that enable people to connect and coordinate online. His research focuses on the design of crowdsourcing and social computing systems.

  • Sarah Billington

    Sarah Billington

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioOur group conducts research on sustainable, durable construction materials and their application to structures and construction. Two current areas of focus are damage-tolerant, high-performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composite materials, and bio-based fiber-reinforced polymeric composites that have a closed loop life-cycle. We are also developing methodologies for performance-based durability engineering with a focus on reducing the impacts of corrosion in structural concrete bridges and assessing the impact of climate change on the vulnerability of bridges to damage or collapse caused by scour. In the area of engineering education we are researching the impact of web-based activities on mechanics self-efficacy and achievement in an introductory course on solid mechanics.

  • Lacramioara Bintu

    Lacramioara Bintu

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering

    BioLacra Bintu is an Assistant Professor in the Bioengineering Department at Stanford. Her lab performs single-cell measurements of chromatin and gene regulation dynamics, and uses these data to develop predictive models of basic biological processes and improve mammalian cell engineering.

    Lacra started working on the theory of gene regulation as an undergraduate with Jané Kondev from Brandeis University and Rob Phillips from Caltech. As a Physics PhD student in the lab of Carlos Bustamante at U.C. Berkeley, she used single-molecule methods to tease apart the molecular mechanisms of transcription through nucleosomes. She transitioned to studying the dynamics of epigenetic regulation in live cells during her postdoctoral fellowship with Michael Elowitz at Caltech. She started her own interdisciplinary lab at Stanford in January 2017.

  • Biondo Biondi

    Biondo Biondi

    Barney and Estelle Morris Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My students and I devise new algorithms to improve the imaging of reflection seismic data. Images obtained from seismic data are the main source of information on the structural and stratigraphic complexities in Earth's subsurface. These images are constructed by processing seismic wavefields recorded at the surface of Earth and generated by either active-source experiments (reflection data), or by far-away earthquakes (teleseismic data). The high-resolution and fidelity of 3-D reflection-seismic images enables oil companies to drill with high accuracy for hydrocarbon reservoirs that are buried under two kilometers of water and up to 15 kilometers of sediments and hard rock. To achieve this technological feat, the recorded data must be processed employing advanced mathematical algorithms that harness the power of huge computational resources. To demonstrate the advantages of our new methods, we process 3D field data on our parallel cluster running several hundreds of processors.

    Teaching
    I teach a course on seismic imaging for graduate students in geophysics and in the other departments of the School of Earth Sciences. I run a research graduate seminar every quarter of the year. This year I will be teaching a one-day short course in 30 cities around the world as the SEG/EAGE Distinguished Instructor Short Course, the most important educational outreach program of these two societies.

    Professional Activities
    2007 SEG/EAGE Distinguished Instructor Short Course (2007); co-director, Stanford Exploration Project (1998-present); founding member, Editorial Board of SIAM Journal on Imaging Sciences (2007-present); member, SEG Research Committee (1996-present); chairman, SEG/EAGE Summer Research Workshop (2006)

  • Jose H. Blanchet

    Jose H. Blanchet

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioJose Blanchet holds a Ph.D. in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University. Prior to joining MSandE he was a faculty member of Columbia and Harvard University. Jose is a recipient of the 2009 Best Publication Award given by the INFORMS Applied Probability Society and of the 2010 Erlang Prize. He also received a PECASE award given by NSF in 2010. He worked as an analyst in Protego Financial Advisors, a leading investment bank in Mexico. He has research interests in applied probability and Monte Carlo methods. He serves in the editorial board of Advances in Applied Probability, Journal of Applied Probability, Mathematics of Operations Research, QUESTA, Stochastic Models, and Stochastic Systems.

  • Kwabena Boahen

    Kwabena Boahen

    Professor of Bioengineering and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLarge-scale models of sensory, perceptual and motor systems

  • Alexandria Boehm

    Alexandria Boehm

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioMy primary research area is coastal water quality, and recently I have expanded my research to include activities on sanitation more broadly. The work on coastal water quality is focused on understanding the sources, transformation, transport, and ecology of biocolloids - specifically fecal indicator organisms, pathogens, and phytoplankton, as well as sources and fate of nitrogen and phosphorus. This knowledge is crucial to directing new policies, and management and engineering practices that protect human and ecosystem health along the coastal margin. The work on sanitation aims to develop microbial risk assessment models to gain a better understanding of how pathogens are transmitted to humans through their contact with water, feces, and contaminated surfaces. Research is focused on key problems in developed and developing countries. The goal is to design and test effective interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of infectious disease.

  • Dan Boneh

    Dan Boneh

    Rajeev Motwani Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Boneh heads the applied cryptography group and co-direct the computer security lab. Professor Boneh's research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His work includes cryptosystems with novel properties, web security, security for mobile devices, and cryptanalysis. He is the author of over a hundred publications in the field and is a Packard and Alfred P. Sloan fellow. He is a recipient of the 2014 ACM prize and the 2013 Godel prize. In 2011 Dr. Boneh received the Ishii award for industry education innovation. Professor Boneh received his Ph.D from Princeton University and joined Stanford in 1997.

  • Ronaldo Borja

    Ronaldo Borja

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioBorja works in computational mechanics, geomechanics, and geosciences. His research includes developing strain localization and failure models for soils and rocks, modeling coupled solid deformation/fluid flow phenomena in porous materials, and finite element modeling of faulting, cracking, and fracturing in quasi-brittle materials.

  • Reza Bosagh Zadeh

    Reza Bosagh Zadeh

    Adjunct Professor, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME)

    BioReza Bosagh Zadeh is an Adjunct Professor at Stanford University and Founder CEO at Matroid. His work focuses on Machine Learning, Distributed Computing, and Discrete Applied Mathematics. Reza received his PhD in Computational Mathematics from Stanford University under the supervision of Gunnar Carlsson. His awards include a KDD Best Paper Award and the Gene Golub Outstanding Thesis Award. He has served on the Technical Advisory Board of Microsoft and Databricks.

    As part of his research, Reza built the Machine Learning Algorithms behind Twitter's who-to-follow system, the first product to use Machine Learning at Twitter. Reza is the initial creator of the Linear Algebra Package in Apache Spark. Through Apache Spark, Reza's work has been incorporated into industrial and academic cluster computing environments. In addition to research, Reza designed and teaches two PhD-level classes at Stanford: Distributed Algorithms and Optimization (CME 323), and Discrete Mathematics and Algorithms (CME 305).

  • Audrey (Ellerbee) Bowden

    Audrey (Ellerbee) Bowden

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    BioOur lab seeks to develop and deploy novel tools for optical imaging and sensing at the microscale and nanoscale. Our work finds applications both in the clinic and for basic science research; we also have particular interest in the development of low-cost, portable technologies suited for use in poorly resourced environments.

  • Tom Bowman

    Tom Bowman

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Bowman studies reacting flows, primarily through experimental means, and the processes by which pollutants are formed and destroyed in flames. In addition, he is interested in the environmental impact of energy use, specifically greenhouse gas emissions from use of fossil fuels.

  • Stephen Boyd

    Stephen Boyd

    Samsung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Management Science and Engineering

    BioStephen P. Boyd is the Samsung Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. He has courtesy appointments in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, and is member of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. His current research focus is on convex optimization applications in control, signal processing, machine learning, and finance.

    Professor Boyd received an AB degree in Mathematics, summa cum laude, from Harvard University in 1980, and a PhD in EECS from U. C. Berkeley in 1985. In 1985 he joined the faculty of Stanford's Electrical Engineering Department. He has held visiting Professor positions at Katholieke University (Leuven), McGill University (Montreal), Ecole Polytechnique Federale (Lausanne), Tsinghua University (Beijing), Universite Paul Sabatier (Toulouse), Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm), Kyoto University, Harbin Institute of Technology, NYU, MIT, UC Berkeley, CUHK-Shenzhen, and IMT Lucca. He holds honorary doctorates from Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, and Catholic University of Louvain (UCL).

    Professor Boyd is the author of many research articles and three books: Convex Optimization (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory (with L. El Ghaoui, E. Feron, and V. Balakrishnan, 1994), and Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced many open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), CVXPY (with Steven Diamond) and Convex.jl (with Madeleine Udell and others), widely used parser-solvers for convex optimization.

    Professor Boyd has received many awards and honors for his research in control systems engineering and optimization, including an ONR Young Investigator Award, a Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the AACC Donald P. Eckman Award. In 2013, he received the IEEE Control Systems Award, given for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. In 2012, Michael Grant and he were given the Mathematical Optimization Society's Beale-Orchard-Hays Award, given every three years for excellence in computational mathematical programming. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, SIAM, and INFORMS, a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Control Systems Society, and a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering. He has been invited to deliver more than 90 plenary and keynote lectures at major conferences in control, optimization, signal processing, and machine learning.

    He has developed and taught many undergraduate and graduate courses, including Signals & Systems, Linear Dynamical Systems, Convex Optimization, and a recent undergraduate course on Matrix Methods. His graduate convex optimization course attracts around 300 students from more than 20 departments. In 1991 he received an ASSU Graduate Teaching Award, and in 1994 he received the Perrin Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in the School of Engineering. In 2003, he received the AACC Ragazzini Education award, for contributions to control education, with citation: “For excellence in classroom teaching, textbook and monograph preparation, and undergraduate and graduate mentoring of students in the area of systems, control, and optimization.” In 2016 he received the Walter J. Gores award, the highest award for teaching at Stanford University. In 2017 he received the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE, with citation "For inspirational education of students and researchers in the theory and application of optimization."

  • Margaret Brandeau

    Margaret Brandeau

    Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (PCOR)

    BioProfessor Brandeau is the Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and a Professor of Medicine (by Courtesy). Her research focuses on the development of applied mathematical and economic models to support health policy decisions. Her recent work has focused on HIV prevention and treatment programs, programs to control the spread of hepatitis B virus, and public health preparedness plans. She has served as Principal Investigator or Co-PI on a broad range of funded research projects.

    She is a Fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) and a member of the Omega Rho International Honor Society for Operations Research and Management Science. From INFORMS she has received the President’s Award (recognizing important contributions to the welfare of society), the Pierskalla Prize (for research excellence in health care management science), the Philip McCord Morse Lectureship Award, and the Award for the Advancement of Women in Operations Research and the Management Sciences. She has also received the Award for Excellence in Application of Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes Research from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, among other awards. Professor Brandeau earned a BS in Mathematics and an MS in Operations Research from MIT, and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems from Stanford.

  • Reilly Patrick Brennan

    Reilly Patrick Brennan

    Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering

    BioReilly P. Brennan is a founding partner at Trucks, a seed-stage venture capital fund for entrepreneurs changing the future of transportation. Trucks investments focus on autonomous, connected and shared vehicle technologies.

    Reilly holds a teaching appointment at Stanford University, where he teaches twice per year in the School of Engineering and the d.school. His classes bridge the fields of transportation, design and entrepreneurship. He is a dedicated educator and advisor to young researchers and entrepreneurs, actively participating in mentorship roles at Techstars Mobility and the University of Michigan.

    His influential newsletter FoT is a radar for what’s happening in transportation.

    Prior to Trucks, Reilly was Executive Director for Stanford’s automotive research program, Revs. Prior to Stanford he developed his love for transportation in media and technology at editorial publications ranging from Automobile to AOL to Monocle and seat time in over 1000 test cars. He was a member of the Le Mans-winning factory Corvette C5-R program. His personal land speed record is 168 mph, behind the wheel of a Chaparral 2E.

  • Leticia Britos Cavagnaro

    Leticia Britos Cavagnaro

    Adjunct Professor, Hasso Plattner Institute of Design

    BioLeticia Britos Cavagnaro, Ph.D., is co-Director of the University Innovation Fellows, a program of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school), which empowers students to be co-designers of their education, in collaboration with faculty and leaders at their schools. Leticia was Deputy Director of the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter), an NSF-funded initiative that operated from 2011 to 2016 to foster innovation and entrepreneurship in engineering education nationwide. She is an adjunct professor at the d.school, where she teaches Stanford students of all disciplines how to build their creative confidence to become engines of innovation in teams and organizations. Leticia has a Ph.D. in Developmental Biology from Stanford's School of Medicine, and is a former member of the Research in Education & Design Lab (REDlab) at Stanford’s School of Education. Having witnessed the journey of students who are transformed by their experience at the d.school, bringing design thinking to more people beyond Stanford has become a priority for Leticia, and she has worked with hundreds of educators and students of all ages, as well as corporate and non-profit leaders in the US and abroad. In the Summer of 2013, Leticia engaged thousands of people from over 130 countries in learning design thinking and applying the methodology to innovate in their contexts, via an experiential MOOC (http://novoed.com/designthinking).

    Find out more about Leticia's work at:
    http://universityinnovationfellows.org
    http://epicenter.stanford.edu
    http://teachingcommons.stanford.edu/teaching-talk/design-thinking-action-lab-1

    Connect with Leticia:
    LinkedIn: linkedin.com/pub/leticia-britos-cavagnaro/9/b4a/752/
    Twitter: @LeticiaBritosC (twitter.com/leticiabritosc)

  • Ryan E. Brock

    Ryan E. Brock

    Lecturer, Materials Science and Engineering

    BioRyan received his B.S./M.S. degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University (2011) and his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Stanford University (2016). His doctoral work focused on thermomechanical degradation mechanisms in various thin film technologies, primarily with the purpose of improving reliability of multijunction photovoltaic devices. Ryan is interested in the materials challenges associated with matching the world's growing need for renewable energy, and in helping to combat the effects of anthropogenic climate change through technological advancement.

    Ryan has extensive experience in teaching, mentorship, and community building, both at Northwestern and Stanford. As a Lecturer in the Materials Science and Engineering department, he currently teaches "Mechanical Behavior Laboratory", "Nanostructure and Characterization", and "Nanomaterials Laboratory", in addition to past and present assistance in the instruction of "Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices Laboratory" and "Mechanical Properties of Materials".

    In his free time, Ryan enjoys watching (the general ineptitude of) Chicago sports, baseball, games (both board- and video-), and watching Netflix with his wife Emily and their cat, Liz Lemon.

  • Mark Brongersma

    Mark Brongersma

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioMark Brongersma is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Materials Science from the FOM Institute in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in 1998. From 1998-2001 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the California Institute of Technology. During this time, he coined the term “Plasmonics” for a new device technology that exploits the unique optical properties of nanoscale metallic structures to route and manipulate light at the nanoscale. His current research is directed towards the development and physical analysis of nanostructured materials that find application in nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. Brongersma received a National Science Foundation Career Award, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, the International Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences (Physics) for his work on plasmonics, and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, the SPIE, and the American Physical Society.

  • Zev Bryant

    Zev Bryant

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular motors lie at the heart of biological processes from DNA replication to vesicle transport. My laboratory seeks to understand the physical mechanisms by which these nanoscale machines convert chemical energy into mechanical work.

  • Carlos Bustamante

    Carlos Bustamante

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on analyzing genome wide patterns of variation within and between species to address fundamental questions in biology, anthropology, and medicine. My group works on a variety of organisms and model systems ranging from humans and other primates to domesticated plant and animals. Much of our research is at the interface of computational biology, mathematical genetics, and evolutionary genomics.

  • Thomas Byers

    Thomas Byers

    Entrepreneurship Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioAt Stanford University since 1995, Professor Tom Byers focuses on education regarding high-growth entrepreneurship and technology innovation. He is the first holder of the Entrepreneurship Professorship endowed chair in the School of Engineering, and is also a Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. He has been a faculty director since the inception of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP), which serves as the entrepreneurship center for the engineering school. STVP includes the Mayfield Fellows work/study program for undergraduates and the Entrepreneurship Corner (eCorner) collection of thought leader videos. He was the director and lead principal investigator of the Epicenter, which was funded by the National Science Foundation to stimulate entrepreneurship education at all US engineering and science colleges. He is the co-author of a textbook called Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise that is published by McGraw-Hill.

    He is a past recipient of the prestigious Gordon Prize by the National Academy of Engineering in the USA and Stanford University's Gores Award, which is its highest honor for excellence in teaching. He is a member of the board of trustees at Menlo College. He has been a member of advisory boards at Harvard Business School, UC Berkeley, World Economic Forum, and Conservation International. Tom was executive vice president and general manager of Symantec Corporation during its formation, and started his career at Accenture. Tom holds a BS in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research and an MBA from UC Berkeley. He also earned a PhD in Business Administration (Management Science) at UC Berkeley.

  • Bruce Cahan

    Bruce Cahan

    Lecturer, Management Science and Engineering

    BioBruce Cahan is a Lecturer in Stanford University's Management Science and Engineering Department, a Distinguished Scholar at Stanford's Human-Sciences and Technologies Advanced Research Institute's mediaX Program, and an active member of CodeX Fellow at Stanford’s Center for Legal Informatics. Bruce co-founded the Sustainable Banking Initiative at Stanford. Bruce teaches Ethics of Finance (MS&E 148), Investing on the Buy Side of Wall Street (MS&E 449) and Sustainable Banking (CEE 244A) at Stanford. As an Ashoka Fellow through Urban Logic, Bruce is creating GoodBank™(IO), an independent teaching bank for high-transparency, impacts-aware commercial bankers.

  • Wei Cai

    Wei Cai

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioPredicting mechanical strength of materials through theory and simulations of defect microstructures across atomic, mesoscopic and continuum scales. Developing new atomistic simulation methods for long time-scale processes, such as crystal growth and self-assembly. Introducing magnetic field in quantum simulations of electronic structure and transport.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Camarillo Lab is currently instrumenting Stanford athletes with inertial sensors to investigate the mechanism of concussion. Additionally, the lab is researching cell mechanics for regenerative medicine. We are developing a quantitative, noninvasive and early measure of viability in order to allow clinicians to transfer the single most viable embryo. Other research area is in medical instrumentation as it pertains to robotic catheterization for curing cardiac arrhythmia.

  • Emmanuel Candes

    Emmanuel Candes

    Barnum-Simons Chair in Math and Statistics, and Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioEmmanuel Candès is the Barnum-Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics, a professor of electrical engineering (by courtesy) and a member of the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford University. Earlier, Candès was the Ronald and Maxine Linde Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests are in computational harmonic analysis, statistics, information theory, signal processing and mathematical optimization with applications to the imaging sciences, scientific computing and inverse problems. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University in 1998.

    Candès has received several awards including the Alan T. Waterman Award from NSF, which is the highest honor bestowed by the National Science Foundation, and which recognizes the achievements of early-career scientists. He has given over 60 plenary lectures at major international conferences, not only in mathematics and statistics but in many other areas as well including biomedical imaging and solid-state physics. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2014.

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.

  • Mark A. Cappelli

    Mark A. Cappelli

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cappelli is the author of over 100 papers in these areas. He is currently a member of the Editorial Board of Diamond Films and Technology. He is also secretary of the Electric Propulsion Technical Committee of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  • Matteo Cargnello

    Matteo Cargnello

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    BioMatteo Cargnello is Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Terman Faculty Fellow. His group research interests are in the preparation and use of uniform and tailored materials for heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis and the technological exploitation of nanoparticles and nanocrystals. Reactions of interest are related to sustainable energy generation and use, control of emissions of greenhouse gases, and better utilization of abundant building blocks (methane, biomass). Dr. Cargnello received his Ph.D. in Nanotechnology in 2012 at the University of Trieste (Italy) and he was then a post-doctoral scholar in the Chemistry Department at the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) before joining the Faculty at Stanford. He is the recipient of the ENI Award Debut in Research 2013, the European Federation of Catalysis Societies Award as best European Ph.D. thesis in catalysis in 2013, and the Young Scientist Prize at the 16th International Congress on Catalysis in 2016.

  • Gunnar Carlsson

    Gunnar Carlsson

    Ann and Bill Swindells Professor, Emeritus

    BioDr. Carlsson has been a professor of mathematics at Stanford University since 1991. In the last ten years, he has been involved in adapting topological techniques to data analysis, under NSF funding and as the lead PI on the DARPA “Topological Data Analysis” project from 2005 to 2010. He is the lead organizer of the ATMCS conferences, and serves as an editor of several Mathematics journals