Graduate School of Education


Showing 1-50 of 369 Results

  • Alejandra Alcaraz

    Alejandra Alcaraz

    Master of Arts Student in Education, admitted Summer 2020

    BioAlejandra is a first-generation college graduate from Los Ángeles, California. She graduated with a degree in linguistics from the University of California, Santa Cruz in three years. After earning her B.A., she taught high school Spanish in San José, Brooklyn, and San Francisco before enrolling at the Stanford University Graduate School of Education.

  • Subini Ancy Annamma

    Subini Ancy Annamma

    Associate Professor of Education

    BioPrior to her doctoral studies, Subini Ancy Annamma was a special education teacher in both public schools and youth prisons. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Her research critically examines the ways students are criminalized and resist that criminalization through the mutually constitutive nature of racism and ableism, how they interlock with other marginalizing oppressions, and how these intersections impact youth education trajectories in urban schools and youth prisons. Further, she positions students as knowledge generators, exploring how their narratives can inform teacher and special education. Dr. Annamma’s book, The Pedagogy of Pathologization (Routledge, 2018) focuses on the education trajectories of incarcerated disabled girls of color and has won the 2019 AESA Critic’s Choice Book Award & 2018 NWSA Alison Piepmeier Book Prize. Dr. Annamma is a past Ford Postdoctoral Fellow, AERA Division G Early Career Awardee, Critical Race Studies in Education Associate Emerging Scholar recipient, Western Social Science Association's Outstanding Emerging Scholar, and AERA Minority Dissertation Awardee. Dr. Annamma’s work has been published in scholarly journals such as Educational Researcher, Teachers College Record, Review of Research in Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Theory Into Practice, Race Ethnicity and Education, Qualitative Inquiry, among others.

  • Anthony Antonio

    Anthony Antonio

    Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransitions to postsecondary education; racial, ethnic, and religious minority college student development.

  • Nicole Ardoin

    Nicole Ardoin

    Director, E-IPER, Associate Professor of Education and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCommunity Involvement
    Community/Youth Development and Organizations
    Diversity
    Environmental Education
    Ethnography
    Evaluation
    Organizations
    Qualitative Research Methods

  • Emma Louise Armstrong-Carter

    Emma Louise Armstrong-Carter

    Ph.D. Student in Education, admitted Autumn 2018
    Other Tech - Graduate, Obradvic Program

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEmma Armstrong-Carter is a doctoral student in Developmental and Psychological Sciences at Stanford University and a recipient of the IES fellowship training grant. She received her BA in Psychology & Neuroscience and Geographic Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) in 2016. Emma is amazed by the variation in children’s behavioral, socio-emotional, and cognitive functioning. She studies young children's capacity to contribute to the lives of others--via helping friends, family, and strangers. In particular, she investigates how these types of helping behaviors interplay with children's experiences at school (e.g., self-regulated behavior), and their bodies, using markers of stress-physiology such as cortisol, and autonomic nervous system arousal.

  • Alfredo J. Artiles

    Alfredo J. Artiles

    Professor of Education

    BioProfessor Artiles’ scholarship examines paradoxes of educational equity and addresses their consequences. For instance, he studies how disability diagnoses can unwittingly stratify educational opportunities for racial or linguistic minoritized groups and advances models and tools to rectify such inequities. He co-authored the National Research Council’s 2017 report Promoting the Educational Success of Children and Youth Learning English and served on the White House Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. He and his colleagues led the National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems and the Equity Assistance Center for Region IX. Current work examines the role of cultural and spatial factors in equity reforms for students of color with/without disabilities. He is also documenting how constructs such as “disability” and “inclusive education” embody alternative meanings across settings and scales that can deepen inequities and is generating processes to assemble opportunity structures in such contexts.

    Dr. Artiles was elected Vice President of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) to lead its Social Context of Education Division. He received mentoring awards from The Spencer Foundation, AERA, and Arizona State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Education and Fellow of AERA and the National Education Policy Center. He was a resident fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Artiles received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Göteborgs (Sweden) and is Honorary Professor at the University of Birmingham (UK). The 2011 article based on his Wallace Lecture, “Toward an interdisciplinary understanding of educational equity and difference: The case of the racialization of ability” received AERA’s Palmer O. Johnson Award. His paper “Objects of protection, enduring nodes of difference: Disability intersections with “other” differences, 1916 – 2016” (with S. Dorn & A. Bal) won the 2017 AERA Review of Research Award.

  • Jeremy Bailenson

    Jeremy Bailenson

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioJeremy Bailenson is founding director of Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Thomas More Storke Professor in the Department of Communication, Professor (by courtesy) of Education, Professor (by courtesy) Program in Symbolic Systems, a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and a Faculty Leader at Stanford’s Center for Longevity. He earned a B.A. cum laude from the University of Michigan in 1994 and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Northwestern University in 1999. He spent four years at the University of California, Santa Barbara as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then an Assistant Research Professor.

    Bailenson studies the psychology of Virtual and Augmented Reality, in particular how virtual experiences lead to changes in perceptions of self and others. His lab builds and studies systems that allow people to meet in virtual space, and explores the changes in the nature of social interaction. His most recent research focuses on how virtual experiences can transform education, environmental conservation, empathy, and health. He is the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford.

    He has published more than 100 academic papers, in interdisciplinary journals such as Science, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and PLoS One, as well domain-specific journals in the fields of communication, computer science, education, environmental science, law, marketing, medicine, political science, and psychology. His work has been continuously funded by the National Science Foundation for 15 years.

    Bailenson consults pro bono on Virtual Reality policy for government agencies including the State Department, the US Senate, Congress, the California Supreme Court, the Federal Communication Committee, the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Research Council, and the National Institutes of Health.

    His first book Infinite Reality, co-authored with Jim Blascovich, was quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court outlining the effects of immersive media. His new book, Experience on Demand, was reviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Nature, and The Times of London, and was an Amazon Best-seller.

    He has written opinion pieces for The Washington Post, CNN, PBS NewsHour, Wired, National Geographic, Slate, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and has produced or directed five Virtual Reality documentary experiences which were official selections at the Tribeca Film Festival. His lab’s research has exhibited publicly at museums and aquariums, including a permanent installation at the San Jose Tech Museum.

  • Arnetha F. Ball

    Arnetha F. Ball

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the Graduate School of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLanguage, Literacies, and Studies in Teacher Professional Development; research on the writing and writing instruction of culturally and linguistically diverse students; preparing teachers to teach diverse student populations in culturally and linguistically complex classrooms; linking sociocultural and linguistic theory to educational practice; and using the linguistic resources present among culturally diverse populations to enhance curriculum and instruction. She is currently conducting research on the implementation of her "Model of Generative Change" (Ball 2009) in pre-service teacher education, inservice teacher professional development, and a secondary pipeline program designed to "grow our own next generation of excellent teachers for urban schools." Over the last few years she has been collecting data in New Zealand, South Africa, Australia, and the United States on the preparation of teachers to work with historically marginalized populations. Her research on the use of writing as a pedagogical tool to facilitate generative thinking is ongoing and her most recent project looks at the development of blended online learning environments that are designed to prepare teachers to work effectively with diverse student populations in transnational contexts.

  • Adam Banks

    Adam Banks

    Professor of Education

    BioCommitted teacher. Midnight Believer. A Slow Jam in a Hip Hop world. Cerebral and silly, outgoing and a homebody. Vernacular and grounded but academic and idealistic too. Convinced that Donny Hathaway is the most compelling artist of the entire soul and funk era, and that we still don't give Patrice Rushen enough love. I'm a crate digger, and DJ with words and ideas, and I believe that the people, voices and communities we bring with us to Stanford are every bit as important as those with which we engage here at Stanford.

    Born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio, I come to Stanford from the University of Kentucky, where I served on the faculty of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies and prior to that, from Syracuse University, as a member of the faculty of the Writing Program. In addition to these appointments I served as the Langston Hughes Visiting Professor of English at the University of Kansas and, jointly with Andrea Lunsford, as the Rocky Gooch Visiting Professor for the Bread Loaf School of English.

    My scholarship lies at the intersections of writing, rhetoric and technology issues; my specialized interests include African American rhetoric, community literacy, digital rhetorics and digital humanities. My most recent book is titled Digital Griots: African American Rhetoric in a Multimedia Age, and my current digital/book project is titled Technologizing Funk/Funkin Technology: Critical Digital Literacies and the Trope of the Talking Book.

  • Ralph Banks

    Ralph Banks

    The Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioRalph Richard Banks (BA ’87, MA ’87) is the Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor, by courtesy, at the School of Education. A native of Cleveland, Ohio and a graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Law School (JD 1994), Banks has been a member of the Stanford faculty since 1998. Prior to joining the law school, he practiced law at O’Melveny & Myers, was the Reginald F. Lewis Fellow at Harvard Law School and clerked for a federal judge, the Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. (then of the Southern District of New York). Professor Banks teaches and writes about family law, employment discrimination law and race and the law. He is the author of Is Marriage for White People? How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone. At Stanford, he is affiliated with the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and the Ethnicity, the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. His writings have appeared in a wide range of popular and scholarly publications, including the Stanford Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. He has been interviewed and quoted by numerous print and broadcast media, including ABC News/Nightline, National Public Radio, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

  • Donald Barr

    Donald Barr

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, at the Graduate School of Education

    BioDonald Barr is a physician and is Associate Professor of Sociology and Human Biology, and is the founder and director of Stanford’s undergraduate curriculum in health policy. His research has included health policy and health care reform in the former Soviet Union and the effect of the organizational structure of the U.S. medical care delivery system on the quality of primary care. More recently he has begun to study cultural and linguistic barriers to health care access for low-income patients, and factors associated with higher rates of attrition from pre-medical studies among minority students at Stanford and other universities. His book, Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing, and Delivery of Health Care in America, was recently published by Pearson Education. In June 2003 Dr. Barr was awarded the Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contribution to Undergraduate Education at Stanford University. This conversation focused on writing for medicine and social science.

  • Brigid Barron

    Brigid Barron

    Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include the longitudinal documentation of learner pathways to engagement, studies of families as technology-supported learning teams, and the roles that personal learning networks play in catalyzing and sustaining interest-driven learning She is founder of the YouthLAB at Stanford, and a co-lead of TELOS, a Stanford Graduate School of Education Initiative to investigate how technologies can provide more equitable access to learning opportunities.

  • Eric Bettinger

    Eric Bettinger

    Professor of Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBettinger, Eric and Bridget Long. “Simplification and Incentives: A Randomized Experiment to Increase College Savings."

    Antonio, Anthony, Eric Bettinger, Brent Evans, Jesse Foster, and Rie Kijima. “The Effect of High School College Advisement: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Texas.”

    Bettinger, Eric, Michael Kremer, Maurice Kugler, and Juan Saavedra. “The Effect of Educational Vouchers in Colombia on Students’ Labor Market Outcomes.”

    Bettinger, Eric, Oded Gurantz, Laura Kawano, and Bruce Sacerdote. "The Long-run Impacts of Merit Aid: Evidence from California's Cal-Grant."

    Bettinger, Eric, Lindsay Fox, Susanna Loeb, and Eric Taylor, “Changing Distributions: How Online College Classes Alter Student and Professor Performance.”

  • Jo Boaler

    Jo Boaler

    Nomellini and Olivier Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStudying the Impact of a Mathematical Mindset Summer Intervention, HapCaps: Design and Validation of Haptic Devices for improving Finger Perception (with engineering & neuroscience) The effectiveness of a student online class (https://lagunita.stanford.edu/courses/Education/EDUC115-S/Spring2014/about) (NSF). Studies on mathematics and mindset with Carol Dweck and Greg Walton (various funders). Studying an online network and it's impact on teaching and learning (Gates foundation)

  • Hilda Borko

    Hilda Borko

    Charles E. Ducommun Professor in the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsToward a Scalable Model of Mathematics Professional Development: A Field Study of Preparing Facilitators to Implement the Problem-Solving Cycle

    The Problem-Solving Cycle (PSC) model of mathematics professional development encourages teachers to become part of a collaborative and supportive learning community. As they participate in the PSC, teachers think deeply about both mathematics content and instruction, and they explore their instructional practices with their colleagues through the use of video and other classroom artifacts. One iteration of the PSC consists of three interconnected professional development workshops, all organized around a rich mathematical task. During Workshop 1, teachers collaboratively solve the mathematical task and develop plans for teaching it to their own students. Shortly after the workshop, the teachers implement the problem with their own students and their lessons are videotaped. In Workshop 2 teachers explore the role they played in implementing the problem. In Workshop 3 teachers critically examine students’ mathematical reasoning.

    The Problem-Solving Cycle model provides a structure for mathematics teachers to work together and share a common mathematical and pedagogical experience. Our previous research suggests that it is a promising model for enhancing teachers’ knowledge and supporting changes in classroom practice.

    In our current project, initiated in Fall 2007, we are working with a group of middle school mathematics teachers in a large urban district to foster their leadership capacity, and specifically to prepare them to facilitate the Problem-Solving Cycle. We will provide 2½ years of preparation and support for teachers who have been designated as “mathematics instructional leaders.” These instructional leaders will in turn implement the PSC with the mathematics teachers in their schools. We will document the range and quality of the instructional leaders’ implementation of the PSC. We will also analyze the impact of the professional development process on the mathematical knowledge and classroom teaching of the instructional leaders and the mathematics teachers with whom they work. In addition, we will analyze the impact on their students’ mathematics achievement. By the conclusion of the project, we anticipate that the participating schools will have the infrastructure and capacity to carry out the PSC indefinitely, using their own resources. In addition, the project will produce a highly refined set of PSC facilitation materials—with a strong emphasis on supporting a linguistically and culturally diverse student population—that can be widely disseminated.

  • Keith Bowen

    Keith Bowen

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Education

    BioFor over 10 years, I have worked in the fields of international relief, development, and conflict resolution, building capacity in Eastern Europe, the Balkans, South Africa, Rwanda, Sudan, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, as well as educating students in the U.S. and other Western countries who aspire to work in these fields.

    I've worked as an academic and filmmaker, creating educational documentaries on liberation movements around the world, which I've then used with university students in my classrooms. I've had several programs distributed by the Discovery Channel, which has been rewarding, but what has been especially remarkable to me is the response of my students. I've come to appreciate the power of narrative and immediacy of film to transform students' perceptions of the world and their place in it.

    I also focus on interactivity. On top of narrative and immediacy, I've built programs that draw students into the learning experience through exploration and interaction - with curriculum dynamically shifting based on student choice and response.

    I've taken this work to scale. In my work for the U.S. Government and international humanitarian organizations, I've created courses that have been completed by more than 30,000 students and practitioners, not only at the State Department, USAID, and relief agencies in the U.S., but also at comparable institutions in other countries, and even in internet cafes and refugee camps around the world. I've earned about a dozen awards for these various efforts.

    I'm continuing this work at Stanford. My focus now is using new media and technology to bring university students in the U.S. and other high-income Western Countries into extended contact with students in fragile states and zones of conflict, measuring advances in learning and shifts in attitude through qualitative and quantitative methods.

    This is an extraordinary time for those who use media and technology in teaching and learning. Blended in smart combinations, especially with traditional in-person learning, the new tools we have are powerful:

    - Visual narrative, through its expression in digital cinema
    - Expanding and interconnecting networks of lifelong learners
    - Complex interaction, including multiplayer computer simulation
    - Targeted feedback, dynamically reshaping curriculum to meet individual learner needs
    - Statistical data analysis, upon which to base informed iterative design
    - Worldwide electronic distribution, especially to inexpensive mobile devices

    If we do this right, the world will be much better for it.

  • Bryan Brown

    Bryan Brown

    Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Associate Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Brown's current research examines issues of stress, culture, and language. His work examines how science is taught is ways that may alienate urban students due to the approach to language instruction. This work includes experimental work involving technology based education and inner city teaching practices.

  • Eric Reynolds Brubaker

    Eric Reynolds Brubaker

    Ph.D. Student in Mechanical Engineering, admitted Spring 2017
    Master of Arts Student in Education, admitted Summer 2020

    BioEric is a PhD Candidate in Mechanical Engineering, MA student in Education, and former teaching assistant in Stanford's Product Realization Lab.

    He studies how people work, communicate, and learn across disciplinary, organizational, and cultural boundaries when designing solutions that address complex global challenges (i.e., energy insecurity). This research builds upon theories of design, organizational studies, and the learning sciences. He also conducts research in engineering education on hands-on learning, equity, belonging, and campus-community partnerships.

    From 2010 to 2016, Eric worked at MIT where he co-developed and taught courses (Design for Scale and D-Lab Earth) and managed the MIT D-Lab Scale-Ups hardware venture accelerator. His time was focused on projects and partnerships in Zambia. Previously, he helped launch Zimba Water (a for-profit social venture), was a researcher at the New England Complex Systems Institute, and worked as an engineer at Battelle Memorial Institute. A proud Buckeye, he was raised and went to college in Ohio.

  • Eamonn Callan

    Eamonn Callan

    Pigott Family School of Education Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCivic and moral education; ethical and civic dimensions of educational policy; multicultural education and minority rights in education.

  • Janet Carlson

    Janet Carlson

    Associate Professor (Research) of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) for teaching science, design of professional learning for teachers including equity, core practices, teacher leadership, research-practice partnerships

  • Martin Carnoy

    Martin Carnoy

    Vida Jacks Professor of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearching econometric models of quality of education in Latin America and Southern Africa. Studying changes in university financing and the quality of engineering and science tertiary education in China, India, and Russia.

  • Thomas Caruso

    Thomas Caruso

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Ph.D. Student in Education, admitted Autumn 2019

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research pursuits are focused on system based improvement projects. At Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, I use system based approaches to improve the quality of care patients receive in the perioperative area and in the ICUs, with a focus on safe transitions of care. Through the Department of Graduate Medical Education at Stanford School of Medicine, I advise residency and fellowship programs on evidence based methods to improve their programs, with a focus on mentorship.